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August 13, 1971 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-08-13

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, August 13, 1971

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, August 13, 1971

War comes early to Harrogate St.

(Continued from Page 3)
"And that's what I shall tell
the British army."
George Caddell is the other
son. He lives around the corner
in Cavendish Street. He heard
the shooting and decided to get
to his mother.
George, a work supervisor for
the city corporation, said: "I
opened the front door. There was
a soldier outside. He told me to
get back in.
"I told him what I was about.
I wanted to get to my mother.
He pushed me back and said, 'If
you don't get inside I'll shoot
you.'
"That's supposed to be pro-
tection. They're not fighting the
terrorists but the terrorized."
Next door, lives 66-year-old
Miss Alice Canavon and her in-
valid sister.
"Two of the soldiers kicked
the front door down and charged
upstairs and pushed a rifle
through the bedroom window,"
said Alice.
Across the road Sean and
Martin Murray were sharing a
front room bed. Sean is 7. and
Martin 3.
Their sister Jean is 21. She
pointed to three bullet holes in
the bedroom wall. The nearest
was two feet above the childrens'
pillow, the others a few tortes
higher.
The boys slept through it.
The neighboring terrace is
called Earl's Court Street. Kath-
leen Quinn was standing at her
front door, listening to the trou-
bles as Belfast women do. She
is in a hospital now. Neighbors
said a bullet tore off three of
her fingers.
"A soldier went berserk," one
of them said. "I saw a sergeant
run down the road yelling,
'Who's shooting? What the hell
are you shooting at'?"
Across at No. 9, Mary Hen-
derson's 21-year-old son Martin
was among those "lifted" for
internment in the wave of ar-
rests which on Monday trig-

gered the week's riots and gun-
fights.
The arrests were aimed at the
outlawed Irish Republican Ar-
my, which wants to unite Nor-
thern Ireland with the predomi-
nantly Roman Catholic Irish Re-
public.
Was Martin one of the out-
laws?
Mrs. Henderson's answer was
inconclusive.
"I know my son in the house,"
she said, "but I don't know hin
outside. You don't follow around
a man of 21."
The soldiers took away her hus-
band and her younger son Thurs-
day morning. They took away,
too, a tricolor - the green, white
and gold flag of the Irish Re-
public.
Mrs. Henderson said the flag
wasn't hers: "Some friends just
left it here."
Oscar Henderson and the
youngster were freed within
hours. Oscar had a black eye
and a graze on his forehead.
"They gave us the rifle butts,"
he said,
Complaints like these are mul-
tiplying amid the carnage of
Belfast.
In this case, as in most others,
thse army's answer is that its
men came under attack from
snipers and gasoline bombs as
they moved in to clear rebel bar-
ricades.
The army's problem is that any
move against the barricades
choking the city is seen in the
Catholic areas as the probable
forerunner of more arrests.
Oliver Napier, a Roman Catho-
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lic lawyer who is a leader of the
middle-road Alliance party, sees
fear of internment as the key
to the current situation.
"The overwhelming majority
of Catholics are diametrically op-
posed to the IRA. Too many,
due to intimidation and terror,
are afraid to say so," he said.
"But on one issue, virtually
every Catholic is unitedhAnd
that is an almost psychopathic
revulsion and fear of internment.
"Many Protestants might find
this hard to believe. I plead with
them to accept it as true.
''Many decent Protestants
may find the Catholic reaction to
internment childish and irra-
tional.
"It may be irrational, but
there it is. You cannot argue
logically against the inbuilt re-
vulsion of one-third of the popu-
lation
Sokey's friends
don't py
with nmatches.

Innovative Teaching Opportunity
The Couzens Program has a limited number
of teaching fellowships for graduate stu-
dents during the 1971-72 academic year. If
interested and qualified, call
764-2144
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.

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512 4. Huron Ave.
off State

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limited free parking
free coffee
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