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August 11, 1971 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-08-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, August 11, 1971

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday August 11, 971

- I=

Israeli Folk Dancing
THIS EVENING
At
HILLEL -1429 Hill

FREE

FREE

the
Ann Arbor Rep. Theatre
presents
THE STRANGLER
an absurd comedy
by ARNOLD POWELL
Sat., SUn., Mon., Aug. 14, 15, 16
1429 Hill-8:30-$1.50-Hill Bldg.
SBox Offices Open 7 P.M.
F KSh w Starts at Dusk
" Free Kiddie Pl arounds

.
t
I
, i
I

999029

a

NIGHTLY AT 8:15 & 11:45 Donald
Sutherland
GENE
WILDER
in
"START THE
REVOLUTION
WITHOUT
Ineveryones lift hee's a ME"
SUMMER OF'42 t10:0
* .S -
--NOW! AT BOTH THEATRES-
One Showing Nightly at 8:30-Winner 2 Academy Awards
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER Pr..ante
A story ofkre. FiknedbyDavid ean
ROEErMMT TEVR KW0 GS JONES m
JOHNM V LEO MOEN sSARAH MMES
METFC OORaWSU'ERHVSION* .4G ~

U'books t
For a one-year trial period,
the covers of all the University's
catalogs will be printed on re-
cycled paper.
The paper is a Michigan pro-
duct and is manufactured from
100 per cent recycled fibers. The
year's total production amounts
to approximately 240,000 cata-
log covers on the recycled stock.
"Our trial use of recycled pa-
per is simply a positive step on
the University's part in the in-
terest of saving trees," said Du-
ane Gifford, director of Univer-
sity Publications.
"There is no compromise in
VP Knauss'
(Continued from Page 1)
process of carrying out that re-
organization."
Charles Kidd. assistant vice-
president to Knauss, also sees no,
major change in organization.
"We've just been through a ma-
jor transition," he says, and "I
foresee no change in my pro-
gram" after Knauss leaves. Kidd
has been in charge of student
services dealing with minority
groups and supportive services.
Jerry DeGrieck, former execu-
tive vice-president of SGC, who
served almost one year on the
policy board was mildly praise-
ful of Knauss.
"Being the first vice-president
FREE
ANGELA
DAVIS
AND ALL POLITICAL
PRISONERS
SPEAKERS:
Claudia Morcum,
Co-chairwoman:
Paula Smith,
Youth Co-ordinator
MICHIGAN COMMITTEE
TO FREE ANGELA DAVIS
THURS., AUG. 12
7:30-3529 S.A.B.

with a policy board is such a
thankless task and Knauss did a
pretty good job," he says. "The
policy board concept is some-
what well established, but the
new vice-president is going to
have to be committed to that
idea.
DeGrieck also is worried about
the process of replacing Knauss.
"Another interim vice president
would hurt the office and possi-
bly kill the policy board." he
says.
Like Schenk, DeGrieck is ada-
mant about having a student
controlled s e a r c h committee.
"It's necessary that there be a
search. committee with a major-
ity of students and that they
have a mid-December deadline."
He adds that "Fleming is go-
ing to have to state in writing
that he'll choose one of the peo-
ple the committee suggests."
Fleming, though ne says he is
- Campus location
-2&3 Bedrooms (1z Baths)
-Furnished and
fully Carpeted
-Air-conditioned
- Vacuum cleaner for
every apt.
-Dishwasher and disposal
-Parking
-Laundry Facilities

aware of the student feeling in-
volving the choice of the next
vice-president, says he has not
yet set any procedure for such a
choice. "We haven't made any
decisions," he says. "But I ima-
gine there'll be some sort of
search procedure."
Sign restraint
continued
(Continued from Page 3)
proved in 1966, was ruled sncon-
stitutional by Mahinske last
January. The city has appealed
his ruling to the Court of Ap-
peals.
At that time, Mahinske was a
visiting circuit court judge, and
claims jurisdiction in the current
case on the basis that the new
ordinance violates the spirit of
his January ruling.
However, city officials con-
tend that the new ordinance is a
totally different law and Ma-
hinske does not have jurisdiction
over the case.
The most significant difference
between the old and new ordi-
nances is that the first was retro-
active. All signs which did not
conform to the old law were to
be removed. Mahinske cited this
section of the ordinance as a ma-
jor reason for finding the law
unconstitutional.
This section has been deleted .
from the new ordinance with the
provision that if the old law is
upheld by a higher court, non-
conforming signs will be taken
down.
THINK ECOLOGY: Glass for i
recycling can be brought to the
Arborland recycling s t a t i o n,
northwest corner of the parking
lot behind Wards. The center is
open Sunday - Thursday, 10:00-
5:30. Glass should be separated
by color, with all caps and rings
removed.

o use recycled paper
quality. It's excellent paper. We figures, 66.5 million cords of
have also begun recommending woods or about 8.5 billion cubic
recycled paper for other Uni- feet, are used each year in the
versity publications which seem production of paper.
adaptable for their use." *
The paper for the covers is Two freshman medical stu-
made from the waste resulting dents at the University have re-
from envelope manufacture and ceived $750 scholarships for two
reclaimed computer print-out pa- months of research and clinical
per. Most recycled paper is still training in allergy.
too expensive to be truly com- Jay Daitch of Southfield and
petitive, according to Gifford. Ruel Wright of 1444 W. Liberty,
But he said it will soon be avail- Ann Arbor, are studying this
able at competitive prices for summer under the supervision of
writing and business papers as faculty of the departments of
well as for cover and text stock. microbiology and internal medi-
According to U.S. government cine.
success failures debated

4

I

PLUS-FRANK SINATRA "DIRTY DINGUS MAGEE"

MODEL OPEN
Mon.-Wed.-Fri, 1:30-4:30

Ponovision in color
Based on a 1935 novel about Depression youth by Horace McCoy.
The book was well-received but soon forgotten here. It survived
primarily through its reputation with Malraux, Gide, Sartre and
Simone de Beauvoir as "the first existentialist novel to come from
America.'
In HORSES Jane Fonda completely redefined her identity as an
acrtess. She "gives a dramatic performance that turns her pre-
vious career as a sex bon bon upside down, and gives the film a
personal focus and an emotionally gripping power. "-VARIETY
TONIGHT Thurs.-Friday, Aug. 11-13
7:30 9:45 midnight Fri. $1 cont.
ARM at the Alley 330 Maynard,

Hey, George..
Yeah,Martha..
HAVE YOU HEARD
ABOUT-THOSE
GREAT FALL
JOBS at the -
You TOO can be a
Daily advertising salesman
CALL SUZI at 764-0560 afternoons for more info.

I

al

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