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July 30, 1971 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-07-30

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Friday, July 30, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Bruce leaves Viet talks;
" Cease-fire plan rejected

Suggests metric switch
Secretary of Commerce Maurice Stans briefs newsmen yesterday
on his department's proposal that the nation switch to the
metric system of measurement within 10 years. Dr. Lewin Brans-
comb, director of the National Bureau of Standards is at right.
LN.Y. TIMES REPORT:
U.S. suspends spy
P P0
missions over China
NEW YORK (A) - Administration officials says the United States
has suspended flights of all manned and unmanned reconnaissance
planes over the People's Republic of China to avoid any incident that
might interfere with President Nixon's planned visit to Peking, The
New York Times reported today.
Reconnaissance satellites, considered relatively unprovocative
because they operate at altitudes of about 100 miles, will continue
missions over China, the Times said.
The White House declined comment on the Times' story. Ronald

PARIS () - Ambassador
David Bruce ended his term
as U.S. negotiator at the
Vietnam peace talks with a
plea for immediate negotia-
tions on an internationally
controlled cease - fire
throughout Indochina.
North Vietnam and the Viet
Cong instantly rejected the pro-
posal, as they have rejected all
similar American proposals over
the past two years.
Viet Cong Foreign Minister
Nguyen Thi Binh called it "an
arrogant maneuver to legalize
the American military occupa-
tion of South Vietnam."
Bruce, 73, is retiring after a
year at the head of the U.S. dele-
gation. He is to be replaced in
late August by William Porter,
U.S. ambassador to South Korea.
Until Porter gets to Paris, the
U.S. peace delegation will be
headed by Philip Habib, who then
will replace Porter in Seoul.
Appearing for the last time, at
the 123rd weekly session, Bruce
wished the delegations success
in their search for a peaceful
settlement.
The Communist delegations re-
plied that President Nixon alone
is responsible for the continuing
deadlock, because of his refusal
to set a date for total and uncon-
ditional withdrawal of American
forces.
"Mr. Bruce not only executed
the directives of President Nixon,
he was an advocate of Nixon's
policies," said Hanoi spokesman
Nguyen Thanh Le.
Le went on to accuse Bruce of
"real responsibility" for his pro-
fessed inability to understand
the Viet Cong seven-point peace
plan submitted on July 1. Bruce
has asked for clarification of the
plan during the past three ses-
sions of the talks, but received
no reply.
As Bruce left the conference
room for the last time, he nodded
to the Communist negotiators in
a farewell gesture, but did not
shake hands.
Le and Viet Cong spokesman
Duong Dinh Thao accused Bruce
of "calumny" against their dele-

U.S. AMBASSADOR DAVID BRUCE waves to newsmen as he
arrives for his last session as head of the American delegation
to the Paris peace talks yesterday.

Ziegler, the President's press
secretary, was asked several
times by newsmen whether the
account was accurate. He said
he would not comment on "specu-
lation."
The State Department also re-
fused comment.
The newspaper said in a story
from its Washington bureau that
flights by U2 spy planes operated
by the Chinese Nationalists from
Formosa are not affected by the
suspension.
The administration move re-
calls the 1960 incident when a
planned summit meeting between
President Dwight Eisenhower
and Premier Nikita Krushchev
was cancelled by the Soviet Union
after an American U2 piloted by
Francis Gary Powers was shot
down over Soviet territory.
The Times quoted informants
as saying that the political rea-
sons for halting the flights over
China were considered much
more compelling than occasional
intelligence gained through the
operations.
Affected by the suspension are
flights by the two-man, twin-jet,
SR71 spy plane and the Ryan
Firebee reconnaissance drone,
the Times said.

IT.S. to shave
atomic plans
WASHINGTON (') - The Unit-
ed States announced yesterday
it is "prepared to undertake dis-
cussions" with 10 Western na-
tions looking towardtherpossi-
bility of sharing its hitherto sup-
er-secret technology for produc-
ing fissionable uranium-235 for
use in atomic power reactors.
U-35 is also an ingredient of
atomic bombs, but the Atomic
Energy Commission, in making
its announcement, said any frui-
tion of such discussions would
be made only "under appropriate
financial and security arrange-
ments" - ostensibly to safeguard
against use of the uranium for
bomb-making.
An AEC spokesman told a
newsman the countries the United
States is prepared to entergdis-
cussions with are: Belgium,
France, West Germany, Italy,
Luxembourg and the Netherlands
-all members of the European
Community of nations-and also
with the United Kingdom, Aus-
tralia, Canada and Japan.

gations in his final speech.
This presumably referred to
Bruce's formal complaint that a
North Vietnamese buildup in the
demilitarized zone violated the
understanding under which the
United States halted all bombing
of North Vietnam at the end of
1968.
In his proposal for a cease-
fire, Bruce said it should be sup-
ervised by international observ-
ers, prevent infiltration of out-
side combat forces, halt all kinds
of warfare and violence, and
cover all parts of Indochina.
Binh and North Vietnam nego-
tiator Xuan Thuy immediately
reiterated their rejection of any

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cease-fire unless it was preceded
by a formal American commit-
ment on unconditional withdrawal
of U.S. forces. Such a commit-
ment is the basic condition in the
seven-point Communist peace
plan.
Both negotiators denounced the
forthcoming presidential elec-
tions in South Vietnam as an at-
tempt of the Nixon administra-
tion "to maintain in power the
corrupt Fascist dictatorship of
the traitor President Nguyen
Van Thieu."
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