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July 30, 1971 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-07-30

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, July 3C}, 1971

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, July 30, 1971

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Black pride emerges
in names of children

By Community News Service
NEW YORK - Lumamba,
Kenyatta, Omar, and Tamara
are American black children.
Their African names represent a
trend of black parents toward an
increased sense of pride in their
African and black heritage.
And according to Harlem Hos-
pital, which reported more than
60 African names out of a total
of 233 births in January, there'll
also be a lot of Angelas - named
for Angela Davis-running around
soon.
"We've finally reached a point
where we're acting like proud,
black people and it's time for us
to show it in the children who are
coming up," commented the mo-
ther of three-month-old Lumum-
ha Baraka Pryor.
"I hope he'll emulate the men
he's named for. Both men (Pa-
trice Lumumba and Imamu Ami-
ri Baraka, or Leroi Jones) con-
tributed a great deal to the black
struggle for liberation and as he
grows up, I'll tell him who they
are and what they stand for,"
said 22-year-old Jackie Gives,
Lumumba's mother, in explain-
ing the trend toward African and
Arabic names.
The trend, noticeable in the
publication of numerous books
on the subject, birth records from
hospitals located in black com-
munities, and, inquiries made at
the Schomburg Collection of Ne-
gro Life and History in Harlem,
has become increasingly popular.
"Inquiries come in every day,"

STEREO VISION

lamented an overworked Ruth
Ann Stewart, assistant curator of
the famed Schomburg Collection.
"We try to help as many peo-
ple as we can over the phone,
but we also encourage them to
come in and do individual re-
search on the meanings and
translation of names."
Books in the collection, which
houses numerous Swahili and
Yoruba dictionaries, are report-
edly wearing out from overuse.
"There's definitely a growing in-
terest in African names and I
suspect we'll hear a lot of them
in the near future," said Miss
Stewart.
The Drum and Spear Press, a
black publishing company in
Washington, D.C., reports it is
now in its second printing of a
publication entitled "The Book of
African Names." The $1, 42-page
paperback contains popular West,
East and Central African names
and meanings and is the com-
pany's second best-selling book.
"More than 5,000 copies have
been sold since it came out less
than a year ago," said Garret
Stark, Drum and Spear's promo-
tion manager. Several other pub-
lications, many of them only
mimeographed sheets published
by cultural groups or individual
researchers, have also come out
on the subject, she said.
"We've gotten orders from
Vietnam and cities in the South,"
she noted, adding that the trend
toward African names is not con-
fined to such large cities as New
York and Washington, D.C.
"Black people have to go
through a total renaissance," said
Les Campbell, head of a black
political and cultural complex in
Brooklyn called The East. "We
have to look toward that which
identifies us with our back-
grounds." All four of his daugh-
ters - Kweli, Nandi, Taifa and
Domali - have African names.
"It's not just enough to have
the hair and the dashiki," said
black anthropologist and history
professor at Mary Mount Col-
lege, Dr. Yosef ben Jochannan.
"The name is important too. It's
all part of our reawakening."

K4
SiI
closed
all day
Saturday
through
August 7
aco sons

Oppose Lockheed loan
Sens. William Proxmire (D-Wis.) and Lowell Weicker Jr. (R-
Conn.) opposing aid to Lockheed Aircraft Corp., tell newsmen
yesterday they will end their stalling tactics on a corporate-rescue
bill if administration supporters would permit a vote on the issue
of saving Lockheed.
U.S. govt. right to draft
Puerto Rican to be tested
By Community News Service He surrendered June 22 to the
NEW YORK - Young Lords assistant U.S. attorney in charge
Party minister of information of the case, George E. Wilson
Pablo Yoruba Guzman, arraigned and was subsequently arraigned
recently for refusing to enter before federal district Judge
the Army, has announced that he Charles M. Metzner.
will use the case to test the U.S. Yoruba was released in his own
government's right to draft recognizance after being cau-
Puerto Ricans. tioned that he faces up to five
Youthful community activists, years imprisonment if he fails tc
the Young Lords were modelled appear.
aftr he lak PnterParty. However, Yoruba told reporters
after the Black Panther he is looking forward to the trial
Yoruba, as he is generally This is the first time, he said
known, has been indicted by a that the issue has been raised in
federal grand jury on two counts the continental United States.
charging him with failure to ap- "We want to see if the federa
pear at a preinduction physical government has the nerve to al
and failure to report for induc- low us our day in court," Yoruba
tion. said. "We want to raise the issue

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"Ofh E A-LE
formerly Canterbury House I
330 MAYNARD'
presents
Friday, July 30
ORMANDYr
show is from 8 to 1
$175
and
Saturday, July 31
GEYDA
SAME PRICE
8 p.m.-1 a.m.
COMING: August 6 & 7
Badfool Blues Band

of the colonization of Puerto
Rico. We are not Americans. We
were impressed into citizenship
in 1917 by the Jones Act."
Puerto Ricans have no obliga-
tion to the U.S. armed forces, he
noted. "The U.S. military fights
in other countries sympathetic to
the plight of Puerto Rico. The
only army that Puerto Ricans
should join is the people's army
of liberation," he said.
Copyright 1971 Community News
Service.

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