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July 15, 1971 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-07-15

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, July 15, 1971

Page Two ~THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, July 15, 1971

Regents to decide on
new Arboretum hours
The Regents will be holding their July meeting today and
tomorrow with an ordinance governing the Arboretum and the
closing of the Center for Conflict Resolution to be among the major
topics of discussion.
Today's meeting which begins at 2 p.m. at the Administration
Bldg. will be closed to the public. It is at this session that the future
of the center will be decided (See story Page 3).
Friday's session will be open to the public.
Another important topic that appears on the agenda for this
month's meeting is a discussion of the University's Willow Run
airport facility. The airport has become the center of some conflict
recently as a result of plans by the Wayne County Road Commis-
sion to purchase the airport from the University.
The commission plans to expand the facility into a major air
freight facility.
Residents of the area surrounding the- site have expressed
strong opposition to the planned expansion charging it would be
destructive to the local ecology.
A citizens group from the area has petitioned the University
requesting the site not be sold.
No final action on the matter is expected for some time.
10-7
MON.-SAT
-r
7he Wihe.5"wppe
347 Maynard St.
PURVEYOR OF THE WORLD'S FINEST WINES
Wenk's Sport Center
Tent Sales & RENTALS
Dacron 88 and
Down Filled
Packs
CAMPING-HIKING EQUIPMENT

REFLECTS ECONOMY
Job market worst in years

Continued from Page 1)
Ph.D.'s that has been widely re-
ported.
According to his study, only
11 of 988 persons who received
doctoral degrees from the Uni-
versity between December 1969
and December 1970 are known to
be unemployeed involuntarily.

Ann Ransford, the law school's
placement director also reports
that despite predictions of a de-
pressed job market for new law
graduates, 70 per cent of the Uni-
versity's 1971 Law School gradu-
ates have already been placed in
jobs with another six per cent al-
ready committed to graduate

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
THURSDAY, JULY 15 ers, Twelfth Night," Lydia Mendels-
Day Calendar sohn Theatre,ae-p.
Religious Affairs Film: "Convesa- General Notices
tions with Paul Tillich III," First Me-
thodist Church, Social Hall, state ,and CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
Huron, 4 p.mt. ested students nnoMndoy and
U-M Audio-Visual Education Center: Peace Corps, will interview interest-
"Bsice Fl Tienasms: ad students an Monday and Tuesday,
Oasic Filt Tem : A Visual Diction- 9-4 in 3520 SA. Stop in when it is
ary, Cinematographer, Powers of Ten, convenient. No appts. needed.
Production Manager. No. 00174, La
Jetee, The Critic," UGLI Multipur- SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
pose Rm., 7-9p.m. 212 SAB
Summer Concert Series: John Og- Ann;Arboropening for graduate stu-
den, piano, Rackham Aud., 8:30 p.m. dent in Material Sciences and/or in-
Michigan Repertory: University Play- organic' chemistry bckgrnd; for further
dea tils contact Suts4 Placement
NOTICE: 5Seic, c1a SAB, 704-7400.
The Gay Liberation F r o n t or "anizauion OICS
open meeting will be held on ga iationto te .
Thursa-y, July 15 at 8:30 Gay LiberatlionFront a on meeing,
Turryy. July 15 830 p.m a2nd aloor
p.m., not Wednesday, July 14 SAB.
as appeared in the July 14
issued of The Michigan Daily Ecology Center Reccling Committee
iThursday July 15, 7:30 pm.
Sch. of Nat. Resources, Room 2024.
Serving: l11 A.M.-1 :30 at nite 1
Ham & Swiss Cheese-85c:
Imported HNam, sliced thin and stacked high with
Cheese Hot or Cold--and served on a hot hord roll
Home-made Meatball Submarine*
95c
all sandwiches served with chips and pickle
208 W. HURON
y*

study, fellowships or legal work
in the military.
Ransford notes that the 1971
figure is brighter than those of
the past several years and -at-
tributes the change to the fact
that Michigan is a "major law
school" and that "students work-
ed harder trying to obtain jobs'
because of gloomy predictions.
Since aerospace has been one
of the industries hit hardest by
the nation-wide economic slow-
down, graduates in engineering
and related scientific areas face
,one of the worst job markets.
CPC reports that job offers
to bachelor's degree recipients in
technical areas are down 66 per-
cent from last year. compared
with 48 per cent in non-technical
CPC's sirvey did not inclide
teaching jobs, either at colleges,
or at elementary and secondary
schools, but indications are the
market in those areas also is
down.
According to figures kept by
Grace Oerther, a University
Placement Service counselor for
recipients of masters and doc-
toral degrees seeking college po-
sitions, total requests for col-
lege personnel throughout the
nation have been cut by at least
one-third since last year in al-
most all fields and by one-half
in: mny fteld.
Requests for college personnel
dropped most sharply in chemis-
try, engineering, English, for-
liou lanuacges, *jornalismc
speech, physical educationncd
social studies.
In addition to economic fac-
tors which are causing state leg-
islatures throughout the country
to cut back on appropriations to
state colleges and universities,
Oerther comments that another
reason for this drop is that a few
years ago college personnel were
especially in demand when a
large nurnber of new junior col-
leges came into existence.
Tihe hitlc,'l Daily, ceiledoandi mm-
ed byscde at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 704-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Sich-
in. 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor.
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sundayismorning Univer-
sity year. Sascrptis +c so10 0;
caiert, $10hy mil.
SomehSesiontu lihd Tusday
thoaugh hatsurdpyisarning. Sobscric-
ti0 rates $5bycarer.byrsili.

I

Conversations with
PAUL TIL LICH
(A Film Series )
TODAY: 4:00 p.m. - Dr. Tillich dis-
cusses religion and psychotherapy, his
analysis of <anxiety, religious faith and
faith in general.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH-
State and Huron Sts.
Social Hall (downstairs)
Sponsored by: Office of Religious Affairs
3rd Floor, Michigan Union 764-7442

WOMEN'S
POT LUCK
&
DANCE
olk & circle dancinog
Fri., July 16
7-11 P.M.
1420 HILL
(at FRIEND'S CENTER)
Bring food, flowers,
tombourines & songs.
DONATION

Radical Independent Party \EPEN
OPEN MEETING
ta discuss
. PLANS FOR FALL
* HUMAN RIGHTS PARTY
* FUNDRAISING ACTIVITIES
* STRIKE SUPPORT WORK
THURSDAY-7:30-3529 SAB
Party Afterward!

$i

DOWNTOWN HONDA
310 E. Washington, Ann Arbor, Mich. 665-8637

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