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June 18, 1971 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-06-18

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, June 18, 1971

Michigan most surveilled state in the nation DL-6416

(Continued from page 1) bill differs from the federal law from so-called 'domestic sub-
Hoffman says that the bill will which allows federal agenices version' is as serious as any
be controversial once it is on - usually the FBI - to tap threat from abroad," Mitchell
the floor of the House. teephone lines without a court says.
"While law enforcement offi- order if national security is "Never in our history has this
cials favor the bill," he says. jeopardized by foreign groups. country been confronted with
"liberal attorneys and civil Atty. Gen. John Mitchell., so many revolutionary elements
however, claims his department determined to destroy by force
rights groups on the floor will should also be able to use elec- the government and the society
probably attack the bill on the tronic surveillance without a it stands for," the atty. gen.
grounds that it invades "indi- warrant against domestic sub- adds,
vidual liberty." versive groups. Examples of the government's
The proposed state wiretap "The threat to our society use of such "unauthorized"
PO s Who is fo~lingh

(Continued from Page 1)
that the POW issue "will be set-
tled" only after Washington sets
a "reasonable date" for full
withdrawal of U.S. and allied
troops from South Vietnam. Laos
and Cambodia and cessation of
all military activity in the same
areas.
Thuy indicated that North Vier-
Nt/ holds
(Continued from page is
A panel discussion cen erg'd
around the role of raising "revo-
lutionary consciousness" among
working class students in voca-
tional colleges.
One member of the ane),t a
teacher at a community corlege
definesi the problem as "nmak-
ing our students dedicated revo-
lutionaries".
The central Question of the aft-
ernoon came from a delegate in
the audience who asked t '?stra-
tegic reasons for working with
blue-collar students in cstteges,
the basic program of the Collette
Industrial Union (CIUa, o'ne of
the groups attending the conven-
tion.
"Why work with students in in-
stitutions in which they have sus
a short tenure and with which
they don't identify?" he asked.
Various panelists, some of
them CIU members paeticioated
in the ensuing discession on the
subject.
Aa major goal of sue sork.
one said, is to change the campus
so it does relate to the world.
Another said political work in
colleges is necessary for working
class students to lear organiz-
ing skills.
"Working class youttt 'he said,
"have been affected by the youth
culture, and they lack th disci-
pline of older workers".
The idea of union organizing,
one delegate said, "fits natural-
ly" into the lives of sorking
class students.
"It must be recogni".ed" he
said "that working class stu-
dents are materially differes:
from students from more affluent
backgrounds.
Often, he explained. these stt--
dents work full time in werk-
study programs to pay for their
educations making a union au-
proach more applicable to them
than to students from more af-
fluent families.

nam was flexible about when
that date might be and that it
did not object to a continued
American military presence else-
where in Indochina. He also raid
that the release of urisoners
could take place even with the
Thieu regime still in power it
South Vietnam.
Thuy, although pressed re-
secret parley
The session closed with some
delebates ocestioning whether the
present NUC organization was
capable of carrying on the type
of program the CIJ members
were advocating.
"It's a question of who we are.
and if it'will be necestary for us
to change", one remarked.
Quinton Gessner of the Univer-
sity Extension Service's confer-
ence and institute office, said yes-
terday that closed convention,'
"rarely occur" at the University.
While expaining that some gov-
ernment conferences are classi-
'fied for "security reasons", he
said he "doesn't remember" any
case in the past of a convention
such as NUC's, being closed to
the press.
Gessner declined, 'iowever, to
express his views as to the pro-
priety of such an arrangement.
Other questions were raised as
to NUC's status as a student or-
ganization at the University.
The Office of Student Organiz-
ations, which keeps such re-
cords, was able only to find an
IBM card indicating the group
was at one time, a student or-
ganization.
While conference memuber Bet-
ty Joe Green claimed the group
is currently recognized, no posi-
tive verification of this is avail-
able due to an apparent loss of
records regarding the group.
University officials, however.
said .they are satisfied that the
group has legal status at the Uni-
versity.
NEWSPAPERS
Friend of the
CONSUMERS

peatedly, refused to tie a ter-
mination of military and eco-
nomic aid to South Vietnam to
the release of American POW's.
This stand has been interpre-
ted variously.
Former Defense Secretary
Clark Gifford, who claims he
also has spoken with individuals
who have had contacts with the
Vietnamese Communists in both
Paris and Bani, says Thy's re-
marks reaffirm what he has al-
ready learned from these sources.
"My understanding is that
there has been no nsistenee on
our cutting off our aid. The feel-
ing was it would be grossly in-
equitable for them to receive aid
from China and the Soviet Union
and for South Vietnam not to re-
ceive aid from the United
States," he said.
However, in what some observ-
ers have charged to be rational-
ization to continue the war. ttts
Nixon administration has inter-
preted Thuy's remarks as indi-
cating the same "hard position
of the past."
losw-gyp
Grandma
boyfriend or pet canary. Giant
2 ft. posters anyone or anything.
Send any photo any size ( re--
turned) 2.95 plus .25 postage
to: Proa otr
P0O. Boa 42972
L.A., Cal., 90050

wiretaps have come to li g h t
recently in several cases.
The government has recent-
ly admitted to using wiretaps
against Pun Plamondon, cur-
rently on trial in Detroit for al-
legedly bombing the Ann Ar-
bor office of the Central In-
telligence Agency in 1968, and
the Berrigans, indicted by a
federal grand jury earlier this
year for allegedly planning to
kidnap presidential advisor
Henry Kissenger.
Currently the government is
appealing to the Supreme Court
a ruling of the U.S. appeals
court in the Plamondon case
that surveillance of domestic
groups is unconstitutional with-
out a court warrant obtained in
advance.
Not including unauthorized
wiretaps, court records show
that federal and state authori-
ties have eavesdropped in 1970
on 390,681 private conversations
involving at least 29,558 in-
dividuals through the use of
telephone taps and hidden mi-
crophones.
Further, applications for
wiretaps doubled last year to
597 - compared with 293 in
1969 -- and state and federal
judges have turned down none
of the requests, the records
show.

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