100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 04, 1972 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-08-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Doge Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, August 4, 1972

'age Twelve THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, August 4, 1972

Brodsky to appear Iems run for sheriff in primary
on area TV show

University poet - in-residence
Iosif Brodsky will appear on the
"Lou Gordon Program" in De-
troit and five other cities this
weekend.
Brodsky is the Russian poet
who was forced to leave the So-
viet Union in June after sev-
eral years of difficulty with the
Soviet government over his non-
conformity to the government's
positions. Most literary experts
regard him as the finest living
Russian Poet.
Prof. of Slavic Languages
and Literature Carl Proffer,
who helped Brodsky through
the red tape of immigration
and invited him to come to Ann
Arbor to teach and continue his
writing, will appear with Brod-
sky on the Gordon program.
The Brodsky appearance is
scheduled for 10:00 p.m. Sun-
day (Aug. 6) on WKBD-TV,
Channel 50, Detroit. The pro-
gram will also be seen in Bos-
ton, Philadelphia, Cleveland,
San Francisco and Los Angeles.

(Continued from Page 1)
dispatching of officers to crimes
and the records will still be kept
in a central location.
"We have to stop the begin-
ning of dozens of two- to three-
man independent police forces,
We can contract to the small
town and supply them with the
number of men they need and
they will pay the costs," Postill
added.
Moon attacks Postill's pro-
gram "because it will increase
the burden on the taxpavers just
like (Sheriff Doug) Harvey has
done over the years."
"We have to clear away the
deadwood and get more officers
on the road into the high crime
areas," Moon says.
"This can be done by replac-
ing a $13,000 deputy with some-
one else to do the job of trans-
porting prisoners to the jail or
courts. We could get retired po-
lice officers and pay them
$7,500 to do the job and get
those regular officers out on the
road," he adds.
He also advocates bringing
"compassion and understand-
ing into the sheriff's depart-
ment."
"We have to stop treating the

prisoners like animals," he
says. "We have to give them
blankets and mattresses. We
have to give them a library so
they have more to read than
just a Bible. We should stop
making them cut their hair and
shaving their beards and mous-
taches. There is no reason to
make them do it, they don't
make women cut their hair."
Moon thinks he will win be-
cause "I have more strength
than Postill in the out-county,
because they know he wants to
double the budget with his sub-
station plan. His only claim to
fame is that he has been fired
by Harvey twice-not once."
Postill has been fired twice
for what Harvey claims was in-
subordination. Postill claims
that he was fired because. "I
was tryingwto organize the depu-
ties into a union and Harvey
didn't like that."
Postill claims a broad base
of support "from all factions
of the community - the old-
time party Dems, student
groups, thetUnited Auto Work-
ers, and the American Federa-
tion of State and County Mu-
nicipal Employes."
He has also worked at gath-
ering the absentee ballot vote
which may total over 4,000 in
this primary. "We are doing a
mailing to the absentee people
and then followingythat by
phone calls," he says. "We
really pushed on these to stop
Harvey while he was still run-
ning in the primary."
Harvey is now running on the
Forest fires bvr.
more thaw trees

American Independent Party's
ticket.
Horn is running to "establish
t r a i n i n g programs at the
schools, and to establish a more
mobile and unified sheriff's de-
partment."
"We should also improve the
jail patrols, provide the prison-
ers with crafts," he says. Horn's
training program calls for
"films in the elementary schools
dealing with crime prevention,
in the junior high we should
have films about the problems
of drugs, and the high schoolers
should be presented with films
on demonstrations."
Horn's campaign literature
describes him as "a man cut
from the cloth of the hardwork-
ing taxpayer, a family man with
two jobs, a no-nonsense patriot.
Richard Horn believes in en-
forcing the laws."
The much less publicized race
for the Republican nomination
for sheriff has four contestants.
Robert Adams, Carl Koch, who
claims 15 years of law enforce-
ment experience, Harold Ow-
ings, presently the county un-
der-sheriff, and William Stand-
er.

Emergency
state called
(Continued from Page 3)
ers to agree to ship the supplies.
Longshoremen in Aberdeen are
already servicing the islands of
Orkney and Shetland and as well
as oil rigs in the North Sea.
Islanders now are planning to
try to break the dock blockade
with an airlift to the mainland.
A committee of dock employers
and union representatives contin-
ued efforts to find a settlement.
Trades, Union Congress leader
Vic Feather said he hoped a con-
ference to vote on a return to
work might be held next week.
TV & Stereo Rentals
$10.00 per month
NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY, PICK UP
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671

Britain announces poll of
N. Ireland likely for fall

(Continued from Page 3)
He has invited leaders of Ul-
ster's Social Democratic a n d
Labor party, the main political
voice of the Catholics; to meet
with him next Monday. T he
party had refused to meet of-'
ficially with the British in the
past but indicated it would talk
with Whitelaw next week.
"The party appealed to Catho-
lics to mute their anger. In the
present situation, restraint and
silence are the best expression >f
resentment," it said.
Whitelaw's plebiscite announce-
ment came toward the end of
a day of relative quiet in North-
ern Ireland. One British soldier
was killed by a terrorist bomb.
A seventh person died yester-
day of injuries suffered 1 a s t
Monday in three bomb blasts in
the village of Claudy, 12 miles
southwest of Londonderry.
The latest deaths raised to 487
the. know fatalities in three years
of communal strife in Northern
Ireland.

Late in the day, British troops
and guerrillas exchanged gun-
fire across Ulster's border with
the republic at Belleek near the
west coast. One gunman was re-
ported hit and no army casual-
ties were announced.
Tension in the street persist-
ed. A full company of 150 Brit-
ish troops was needed to escort.
Protestant workers to their jobs
at the Sirocco engineering plant
in East Belfast. It was the tense
aftermath of a shooting incident
on Wednesdayewhich touched
off a battle between mobs of
Protestants and Catholics.
British military headquarters
claimed an imposing haul of
arms and ammunition in its
searches of former Irish Repub-
lican Army strongholds, since
invading the enclaves Monday.
The army reported seizing six
machine guns, 550 rifles, 27 pis-
tols, 8 shotguns, 16,997 rounds
of ammunition and 3360 pounds
of explosives.

We have the BEST
REPAIRS and SERVICE
around-TRY US
SPORTS CAR SERVICE
OF ANN ARBOR, Inc.
4705 Washtenow
(next to Ypsi-Ann drive in)
434-0110
T-W-F-8-6; M and Th 8-9
SOLMAN
" ABORTION REFORM
" EDUCATION REFORM
" RENT RELIEF
" WELFARE REFORM
demoprat * state represetartive
paid politiesi advertisement

DANCE
FRIDAY-SATURDAY AT 9:00
AND HIS
COURT OF RHYTHM.
-and-
SUNDAY AT 8:30
WASHBOARD WILLIE
AND HIS
Super Suds of Rhythm
217 S. Ashley 4 2 P.M.-2 A.M.

q :
;''
.r°
-:
-4
: :.
.x..
;:
: ,:::
.k<
: k
H '
rte:
'.:3y
ti
, -
?3k .

I,
f
F
e
v
i

.... .._. .

DOUBLE FEATURE-2 movies for the price of one-see both as lIte oas 7:40
'J.W. COOP' is engrossing and beautifully ful- "'GUMSHOE' is a d a r n
filled . . . and it isn't a rodeo movie. Robertson's good tough mystery. A pri-
portrayal is a figure of near-tragic stature, a figure vote eye caper that tips its
embodying, perhaps, the dichotomy of contemporary hat and bows low to Bogie."
American life. In its originality and its integrity, -Judith Crist
'J.W. COOP' offers the hope that it needn't al- New York Magazine
ways be the same old Hollywood."
-Judith Crist, New York Magazine "INTELLIGENT
AND
"EXPLODES WITH ENERGY AND DRAMA!" ENTERTAINING"
-Cue Magazine -Crawdaddy

"Full of feeling for rootless American lives."
-Vincent Canby, N.Y. Times
"PULSES WITH STRONG, HONEST FEELING!"
-Richard Schickel, LIFE

"Sharp, entertainingly off-
beat, and successfully nos-
talgic. Clever, dandy tribute
to the world of pictures like
'THE MALTESE FALCON.'"
-Cue Magazine

' ,.
..
;,
:
.s.::
'.x;
.,v..:
'; y '
!'_ ;
Y
,
;.a;,
. Y

COLUMBIA PICTURES Presents
ROBEiRTSON
FRI.--"Gumshoe"-6:15
"J.W. COOP"-7:40
"Gumshoe"---9:35
SAT-Adults only $1 50 .P
before 5:00 p.m.
"J.W."--- :00, 4:20, 7:40 '. w WA ,R
"Gumshoe"-2:55, 6:15, 9:35 ' '7

-4i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan