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July 27, 1972 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1972-07-27

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Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, July 27, 1972

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, July 27, 1972

The place to meet
INTERESTING people!
BACH CLUB
PRESENTS
Matthew Mischakoff, Guitar
Michael Stoune, Flute
works of
Loeillet, Diabelli,
Villa Lobos
Thursday, July 27, 8 p.m.
South Quad, West Lounge
Refreshments served afterwards
Strawberry Shortcake.
No musical knowledge needed.
Absolutely EVERYONE invited!
Further info
663-4875; 769-1605

-recordssg
New piano releases rated high

By DONALD SOSIN
Claudio Arrau is one of the
great all-round pianists; his spec-
ialty is not specializing. Three
albums from Philips display his
ability to handle three different
bands of the piano spectrum.
Beethoven's Piano Concerto No.
5 ("Emperor") is one of the
masterpieces of the repertoire.
For sheer grandeur it is un-
matched in Beethoven's concerti,
and Arrau brings to it the au-
thority and compassion of a wise

1-75 AT
SASHABAW ROAD
and YZJX tNW present
SUNDAY, JULY 30 at 7:06 p.m.
COMMANDER CODY AND HIS
LOST PLANET AIRMEN
and SPECIAL GUEST-ERIC ANDERSON
ALL TICKETS $4.00 ADVANCE SALE ONLY, AT FISHER THEATRE, AND ALL J. L.
HUDSON BOX OFFICES. NO TICKETS ON SALE AT PINE KNOB DAY OF PERFORMANCE
TICKETS CAN BE PURCHASED AT HUDSONS UNTIL 5pm SUNDAY
MONDAY, JULY 31 at 8:30 p.m.
HEAVY ORGAN
starring VIRGIL FOX
with PABLO LIGHTS
S, 43 (reserved), $2.50 (unreserved lawn)
TUES., AUG. 1 thru SAT., AUG. 5 at 8:30 p.m.
NEIL DIAMOND
$7, $5 (reserved), $3.00 (unreserved lawn)
SUNDAY, AUGUST 6 at 7:00 p.m.
GENTLE JAZZ ROCK NIGHT
with LORIO * AUSTIN-MORO BAND-* CONNIE GRAHAM
* TONY, LINDA & THE TARTANS* BOB ANDERSON *
PRIMO PEOPLE * JOEY VAN* and FRANK MORELLI
All tickets $4.00
MONDAY, AUGUST 7 at 7:00 p.m.
RICHIE HAVENS
with SHA-NA-NA
and the Fabulous Rhinestones
$7, $5 (reserved), $3.00 (unreserved lawn)
L TICKETS ADVANCE SALE ONLY. AT FISHER THEATRE. AND ALL . L.
SON BOX OFFICES. NO TICKETS ON SALE AT PINE KNOB DAY OF PERFORMANCE
SUNDAY, AUGUST 13 at 7:30 p.m.
FIFTH DIMENSION
and SPECIAL GUEST BILL WITHERS
$7, $5 (reserved), $3.00 (unreserved Irwn)i
MONDAY, AUGUST 14 at 7:00 p.m.
STEPHEN STILLS
and
MANASSAS
$7, $5 (reserved), $5.00 (unreserved lawn)
AL TICKETS ADVANCE SALE ONLY AT FISHER THEATRE, AND ALL L. L
NODS tO.OFFICES. NO TICKETS ON SALE AT PINE KNOB DAY OF PERFORMANCE
TUES., AUG. 15 thru SAT., AUG. 19 at 7:30 p.m.
$7, $5 (reserved), $5.00 (unreserved lawn)
ALL TICKETS ADVANCE SALE ONLY. AT FISHER THEATRE. AND ALL . L.
HUDSON BOX OFFICES. NO TICKETS ON SALE AT PINE KNOB DAY OF PERFORMANCE
PHONE 559-9111 - Tickets available at:
FISHER THEATRE BOX OFFICE
and at all J. L. Hudson Box Offices.
Mail check or money order with a stamped self-addressed envelope
to Fisher Theatre Box Office, (name of attraction), Fisher Building,
Detroit, Michigan 48202. Be sure to specify day, date and attraction.
Make checks payable to Pine Knob Music Theatre.

ruler. He is served well by his
"court," the Concertgebouw Or-
chestra of Amsterdam, under
Bernard Haitink. The forces are
well matched, and the results are
the most sensitive and exhiliar-
ating "Emperor" I have heard.
It has taken me a long time
to come to terms with Schumann.
The thick textures he favors in
his Ipng and winding pieces do
not make for ready comprehen-
sibility; his music does not catch
my ear the way Schubert's or
Brahm's does. Perhaps it is just
that his music is harder to il-
luminate than others'.
Whatever charms that the Sym-
phonic Etudes possessed remain-
ed quite hidden from me until I
heard Arran's new recording
(6500 130).
Everything that he does makes
such good sense that all that
seemed recondite before is sud-
denly perfectly clear. There is
not a misplaced gesture, or an
ill-turned phrase in the whole
stunning performance. And in
the spots that one waits for, like
the dramatic change to major
near the end of the Finale (a
powerful moment that other per-
formers I've heard have either
glossed over or overcalculated),
the timing is just right. Grinning'
I realize that the only true
DIAL 5-6290
eion in Plodern Coolin,
"Great fun, all the way."
-Times
a &
1r ; UP
TECHNICOLOR From Warner Bros..

problem with Schumann is that
it takes a genius like Arrau to
play him.
The antithesis of this monu-
mental work is the delicate
Abegg Variations, Schumann's
Opus 1, made infinitely approach-
able and played to perfection.
Together the works show Schu-
mann's many facets, and will
soften up any hard-core Schu-
mannophobe.
Arrau is supposed to be a fine
Chopin interpreter, but I am
not quite happy with his per-
formance of the Concerto No. 1
in E Minor (6500 255). The play-
ing, both Arrau's and that of
the Lindon Philharmonic Orch-
estra under Eliahu Inbal, is tech-
nically fine, but the overall con-
ception is mushy, heavy and
German, and seems at odds with
the music. It will be interest-
ing to hear the second concerto
when it's available here and com-
pare them.
A different style of Chopin
playing is offered by Nelson
Friere on Columbia (M 31128)
A young Brazilian, Friere plays
the notes very well,, but often
seems too calculating, unwilling
to let things sink in for that split
second longer, as Arrau does.
His touch is quite pleasant and
his technique solid, but his inter-
pretation is too matter-of-fact'
something you can't say about
Arrau's Chopin, like it or not.
Friere takes more chances with
the Liszt Sonata in B minor
and there are some good mo-
ments. Yet here, too, Friere
needs to be more carefree, to
give the music more Romantic
sweep.
At the botom of the Liszt this
time is Philippe Entremont, who
strikes out with the Hungarian
Fantasia and the Khachaturian
Piano Concerto. His cohorts ace
Seiji Ozawa and the New Phil-
harmonia Orchestra (Columbia
M 310875.
Entremont is all flash, fire,
and very little feeling. His pl y-
ing has a flipant quality to iL.
apart. from any mention of
"French style," it is just bad
playing, full of sound and fury,
signifying not a hell of a lot.
The second movement of the
Khachaturian offers him a won-
derful chance to be moving and
lyrical, and he blows it, even

though he believes it is one of
the "few authentic lines we have
in this century. It is not cheap
or Holloywoodian . . ." Well, he
sure fooled me. (It realy isn't
cheap, though, if you are lis-
tening to William Kael'ri ul-
trasensitive recording.)
A similar breach of taste can
be found on a Columbia album
called Philippe Entremont /
Greatest Hits / The Piano (M
31406). Well, just leave jut the
"greatest." Entremont proves
here that he is practically incap-
able of rendering interesting
such timeworn "favorites" as the
Ritual Fire Dance, Liebestraum,
Clair de Lune, the Moonlight
Sonata, and more.
Daily critie
awarded trip
to seminars -
Donald Sosin, -nusic critic fir
The Daily, has been chosen to
participate in a Music Critics
Institute to be held in Aspen,
Colorado and Sante Fe, New
Mexico, July 29 - Aug. 18.
The Institute is organized by
the Music Critics Association
and funded by the National En-
dowment for the Arts and the
Corbett Foundation of Cincin-
natti, Ohio.
Sosin and the seven other crit-
ic-participants, selected from a
national roster of candidates, will
received a stipend of $500 and
round-trip transportation. They
will report on musical activities
at the Aspen Music Festival and
the Sante Fe Opera and meet in
daily seminars with critics from
the country's major newspapers.
Sosin is a senior in composi-
tion in the University's School
of Music Honors Program. He
writes and performs original
piano scores for silent films at
Cinema Ouild and other com-
munity organizations.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
THIURSDAY, .JOTSY 27
Sriiv- s chCatn f -r:Det.
of Speech Communic. and Theatre, and
Michigan Speech ArsOC., 4th loor,
Rackham,O am.-5 pm.
Audio-Visual Center Films: "Amert-
Cans on Everest" andothers, Aud. 4,
MLB, 7 pm.
University Players: Behan's "The
Hostage" Power Center, 8 pm.
Politica Science Dvt. Lecture: Alan
K. Campel, Oes otMawel Omit,
Sch. at Syracuse Univ., "Centraiza-
tion or Decentralization: the Metro-
politan Government Dilemma," Rack-
ham Amph. (4th floor), 8 pm.
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