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July 15, 1972 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-07-15

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, July 15, 1972

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, July 15, 1972

Judge orders raise for
hourly wage cutoff point
WASHINGTON (P)-A federal Using Labor Department sta-
judge yesterday ordered the tistics, Jones' ruling means that
Cost of Living Council to raise nearly 10 million workers now
its wage control cutoff point making less than $3.63 an hour
above $1.90 per hour. The order will be able to bargain with
affects about 14 million workers. their employers for raises to
U.S. District Judge William that limit.
Jones, in the first successful The ruling does not auto-
court challenge to President matically guarantee salary in-
Nixon's stabilization program, creases to the $7,000-a-year
ordered the council to abandon level, but "it entitles employes
its $1.90 per hour cutoff point to negotiate for such increases,
beyond which raises are limited something that couldn't be done
to 5.5 per cent. under past regulations.
The Cost of Living Council. The case arose from a suit
which had no immediate reac- filed by AFL-CIO President
tion to the decision, had esti- George Meany and other unions
mated earlier that about 14 mil- against the Cost of Living Coun-
lion workers are being paid be-
tween $1.90 and $3.35 an hour. cil soon after President Nixon
Jones, in his 20-page opinion announced his 90-day wage
and order, did not spell out
precisely how much money a The unions had argued that
person must make to come under the $1.90 figure was unrealistic,
the 5.5 per cent-a-year limit. based . on Bureau of Labor Sta-
But he suggested that $3.63 an tistics study which said that
hour, which figures out to about urban families of four earning
$7,000 a year for a family of four, under $7,000 annually should be
would be reasonable. considered poor.
I 9" r9S' ~ ..s~so" ~ ~ zv4a

-Associated Press
Midnight Ranmbler
Mick Jagger and the Rolling Stones rock and roll for a packed house at Cobo Hall Thursday night.
Before the concert several thousand Stones fans tried to force their way into the hall. Fifteen persons
were arrested.
UPHILL BATTLE:
Chavez lettuce boycott given
new boost by Dem campaign

I
I

SEMI-ANNUAL
Clearance
Sale
Eine Clothing and Furnishings
Pan Iolvw
CLOTHING STORE
326 S. STATE

FRESNO, Calif (RP) - When
Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-
Mass.) hailed delegates to the
Democratic National Conven-
tion as "fellow lettuce boycot-
ters," it gave a big boost to the
Cesar Chavez - led boycott
against non-union head lettuce,
a United Farm Workers Union
official said yesterday.
However, an Associated Press
survey of supermarket chains
across the country indicated
the boycott thus far is having
little effect.
"When we plan a boycott, we
plan for a couple of years,"
said Marshall Ganz, director of
the farm workers international
boycott program.

"The success of the boycott
depends on reaching many,
many Americans and convinc-
ing them not to eat lettuce,"
that doesn't bear the UFW la-
bel, Ganz added. "Something
like this is tremendously help-
ful," he continued, referring to
Kennedy's salute.
Kennedy, who introduced Sen.
George McGovern ID-S.D.)
when he made his acceptance
speech at the convention early
yesterday echoed sentiments ex-
pressed by members of num-
erous state delegations, includ-
ing California, New York, Illi-
nois, Tennessee, Rhode Island,
and Oregon. McGovern also has
come out in support of the boy-

WORSHIP

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
Rev. Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Washington
9:30 and 11 :00 a.m.-Sermon.
Broadcast WNRS 1290 am, WNRZ 103 fm,
11:00-noon.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
Outdoor Extravaganza at Judy's place, 5147
Curtis Rd. out Plymouth way. 11 a.m.
until . . . later. Try to bring food, drink,
yourself, and the Spirit. Cars, buses and
car vans will be leaving from 603 E. Wil-
liam St. from 10:30 on.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 5. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr., R. E. Simonson
9:00 am-Morninq Prover

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
2580 Packard Road-971-0773
Tom Bloxam, Pastor-971 -3152
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-11 :00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.
Training Hour-6:00 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1 833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Services. Sunday School
(2-20 years).
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday.
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. --
Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
For transportation call 668-6427.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw
Minister: Rev. Donald Postema
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH, formerly the Lutheran
Student Chapel and. Center
801 South Forest at Hill
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
Sunday, 10:15 a.m.-Folk Mass.
Wednesday, 5:15 p.m.-Eucharist.
ST. ANDREW'S EPSICOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
10:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist and Sermon.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
iLCMS) 1511 Washtenow Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday morning at 9:00-Bible Study.
Sunday morning at 10:15-Worship Service.
Wednesday evening at 9:00-Midweek Wor-
ship.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Services of Worship-9:00 and 10:30 a.m.-
Sermon: "The Presence of God." Preach-
ing: John R. Waser.
Bible Study at 10:30 a.m.
Holy Communion.

cott.
"We're very pleased with it,"
said Ganz. "Most of the dele-
gations and many of the Dem-
ocratic state conventions en-
dorsed the boycott and urged
people not to buy lettuce."
"The Democratic party is the
largest political organization in
the United States," he added,
"and having that kind- of sup-
port and the fact that it's en-
dorsed right in the platform is
very helpful. We're waiting to
e what the Republicans are
going to do."
The boycott extends to all
lettuce which does not carry
the UFW's stamp, Ganz said.
About 15 per cent of the total
lettuce crop in Californiagand
Arizorna is harvested by grow-
ers which have contracts with
the UFW, he added. However,
many other growers have con-
tracts with the teamsters, which
has led to a jurisdictional dis-
pute between the two unions.
Ganz said the current cam-
paign is directed primarily at
the general public, asking peo-
ple to sign a pledge not to buy
non-UFW lettuce. Each pledge
that is signed, he added, costs a
grower about $15 a year in lost
sales.
Emil Ghio, Jr., president of
Golden West Packing Co., in
Chula Vista, Calif., predicted
that the publicity given the
UFW would hurt the Democra-
tic party.
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
Alfred Hitchcock's
Foreign
Correspondent
Suspense, mystery and quiet
horror as only Hitchcock can
present it. His first American
made film (1940)
"
Next Fri. & Sat.
HOWARD HAWKES'
BRINGING UP BABY
Starring Catherine Hepburn
and Cart Grant
7 & 9:05 p.m. 75c
A&D AUDITORIUM
Ion Monroe between
Haven and Tappan)

10:00 a.m. - Worship Service and Church For information, transportation, personalized
School. help, etc., phone 769-6299 or 761-6749.

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