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June 20, 1972 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-06-20

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Tuesday, June 24, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Tuesday,111 1June111120,II1972II 1THE11MICHIGANIIIIIDAILYIIIIPage $.eIvenMI

McGovern expects big N.Y. win

(Continued from Page')
Democratic Committee in
Washington. While he strongly
condemns the action, McGovern
charged that it was "the legacy
of years of wiretapping and
snooping and violation of pri-
vation of privacy in which the
government itself was too deep-
ly involved." He added that the
situation was moving toward "a
quasi-fascism in which nothing
is sacred."
At the press conference, Mc-
Govern charged the present ad-
ministration with manipulating
foreign affairs to aid the Nixon
campaign for re-election.
"It's not just a coincidence
that all the dramatic break-
throughs have come in 1972 ...
International affairs are being
manipulated for their own do-
mestic purposes," he said.
Overall, yesterday was the
most leisurely McGovern has
spent in the past 2 weeks. After
the press conference, The South
Dakotan visited his headquar-
ters to personally thank a few
of the 30,000 volunteers who
have worked throughout the
state. The young staffers beam-
ed as he went from floor to
floor greeting them individually

and autographing campaign lit-,
erature, T-shirts, and even a,
report card.
Many of the workers are still
in junior high school.
Walking a short distance to
a luncheon with top New York
staffers, McGovern was sur-
rounded by an enthusiastic
lunch-hour crowd on Fifth Ave.
Yesterday evening was high-
lighted by a reception for more
than 100 influential New York
labor leaders.
Interrupted by enthusiastic
cries of "Hallelujah" and "You-
'll win" McGovern offered to be
"labor's friend in the White
House, and assured them that
he was not "a far-out radical
who would take the Democrats
down to defeat in November," as
another presidential candidate,
Senator Hubert Humphrey (D-
S.D.) had charged.
"For many years in South
Dakota, one of the charges that
I had to contend with was that
I was so close to Hubert Hum-
phrey that his extreme liberal-
ism might contaminate me.
Now, he seems to think that's
true . . . We don't elect very
many far-out radicals in South
Dakota to the U.S. 'Senate."

During the week-end, Mc-
Govern concentrated his atten-
tion on the various etlinic com-
munities around the city. He
made a special effort to reas-
sure the Jewish community of
his support for Israel.
In a Saturday night address
at a Manhattan Synagogue, Mc-
Govern said, "when the present
administration took office, the
President called the Middle the
most critical foreign policy
problem after Vietnam" yet the
Middle East is no closer to peace
today than it was then, and the
danger to Israel, in many re-
spects, has increased."
The Senator said that he in-
tended to celebra the 25th
anniversary of Israeli independ-
ence by being "the first Ameri-
can president ever to visit Is-
rael while in office."
McGovern also conferred with
orthodox rabbis at two Hasidic
congregations in Brooklyn. Al-
though Israel was the primary
topic of concern, it, was kept
in the background as the rabbis
informed the Senator of the
need for financial aid for their
schools.
He was not as well received
at Dave's Fruit Market several
blocks away. About 50 demon-
strators from the Jewish De-
fenseLeague greeted his arriv-
al with pushing, shoving and
cries of "Nixon, Nixon" and a
few scattered shouts of "hit
him!" "S m i 1 i n g benignly
throughout, McGovern s a m-
pled some melons and shook
hands with a few supporters.
Secret Service men had to force
his way through the hostile
crowd and back to the motor-
cade.
McGovern also visited the
Black and Puerto Rican com-
munities. Speaking briefly at a
Puerto Rican rally in Harlem
on Saturday, the Senator said,
"what I want more than any-
thing is to build a country
where people care about each
other."
Sunday morning, the ex-
Methodist minister spoke at a
Harlem church, emphasizing his
tax-reform proposal. "Why is it
so disturbing to do something to
help people in the $5,000 to
$15,000 income bracket," Mc-
Govern asked, "if it's all right
to help a big corporation?'"

MMI petitions legal
The Michigan Marijuana. Initiative (MMI), was verbally notified
yesterday that the revised petition form is approved as to form
by the State Board of Canvassers.
The Secretary of State's Election Division informed MMI
attorney Perry Bullard of the decision which was made last Friday.
The revised petition has been circulating since May 15. It con-
tains the same text of the proposed amendment as the original
petition, but also has the added line "a proposal to add Article 1,
Section 24 as follows:" which explicitely identifies the intended
location of the proposal in the Michigan Constitution.-
Four to five thousand signatures were collected in the one week
that the earlier petition form was circulating. Bullard contends that,
"These signatures on the earlier petition form are valid and if
necessary the Michigan Marijuana Initiative drive will go to court
to establish their validity." He explains that "the statute regulating
constitutional amendment petitions requires only that the petition
include the full text of the amendment. The Michigan Marijuana
Initiative contends that the Article and Section number are not a
part of the full text, but merely a notification to the compilers of
where to put the amendment." Bullard continues, "We really didn't
care where they put it in the constitution as long as it passes
and becomes a part of the constitution."
Bullard points to the parochiaid and the 18-year-old constitutional
amendments as they appeared on the ballot in 1970. Neither included
the article or section number to be amended or added. "T h e
voters on election day never see the exact article and section number
of proposed amendments when they vote because the one hundred
word description written for the ballot by the State Elections
Director does not include the article and section number," Bullard
explains.
Local candidates file
With the filing deadline for the August 8 primary set
for today, there was a flurry of electoral activity in the
city yesterday as late-comer rushed to announce their can-
didacies.
One of the best known of yesterday's filers was U. S.
Rep. Marvin Esch (R-Ann Arbor) who is seeking re-elec-
tion. Esch will be upopposed in the Republican primary.
University accountant Bill Brown also announced his
candidacy yesterday, seeking 'the Democratic nomination
to face Esch in November. Also contesting the Democratic
nomination for the congressional seat are State Rep.
Marvin Stempien (D-Livonia), Walter Shapiro, Billy Turner
and Fred Schwall.

DIAL ofL 444'A TONIGHT
8-6416 t at 7 & 9 p.m.
El J:Emmt\\ %\

GOOD SEATS STILL AVAILABLE
UAC-Daystar presents
FEATURING
ROD STEWART RON WOOD,
RON LAINE IANMcLAGEN
KENNY JONES
-PLUS-
BADFINGER
Wednesday, July 5-8:30 p.m.
CRISLER ARENA
TICKET INFORMATION
ALL TICKETS $5.00-ALL RESERVED SEATS
BEST SEATS WILL BE SOLD FIRST
LIMIT 10 PER PERSON-NO CHECKS PLEASE
On sole at MICHIGAN UNION 9-5
and NED'S BOOKSTORE, YPSILANTI

GWOBk Day'
The Community Organic Gar-
den on North Campus is spon-
soring a community work-in to-
morrow. All participating work-
ers will be rewarded with free
salad.
Mulching and weeding need
to be done. Workers will be
welcome, garden officials say, to
come work between 10 a.m. and
6 p.m. Participants should bring
a dish to pass, a salad bowl and
their own dressing.
A lawnmower, wheel barrow
and hand tools are also needed
at the garden. Anyone owning
these items to lend should bring
them to the garden.
The garden is located on the
corner of Beal Ave. and Glacier
Way on North Campus. In case
of rain the Work Day will be
rescheduled to Thursday.

George Sallade, a well known
local Democrat announced his
candidacy fur his party's nomi-
nation for Washtenaw County
prosecutor. Sallade is a member
of the NAACP and the American
Civil Liberties Union.
In. addition to the new candi-
dates there was one dropout re-
ported yesterday.
Circuit Judge John Conlin an-
nounced yesterday he will not
seek re-election.
Conlin, who will be 68 in Oc-
tober cited age as his reason for
leaving the bench.
-y

ends tonight-6:30, 8:00, 9:30
CHARLIE CHAPMAN in

"MODERN
TIMES"
STARTING TOMORROW

the FIFTH FORUM presents:
ANN ARBOR CINEMATHEQUE
INTERNATIONAL DIRECTOR'S FESTIVAL NO. 1
3 features daily-Wednesday and Thursday
Dusan Makavejev's "LOVE AFFAIR" (Yugoslavia)
"A charmingly blithe and buoyant tangle of satiric sex"
-N.Y. Times, reviewed at the N.Y. Film Festival
"Near-Classic Stature"-Judith Crist
wed, 6:30-thur, 10:20
Roman Polanski's "CUL-DE-SAC" (Great Britain)
Grand Prize Berlin Festival--Critic's Award Venice Festival
"Razor-edged slapstick ... tension ... horror and
hilarity"-Time
wed, 7:40-thur, 8:50
Akira Kurosawa's "IKIRU (TO LIVE)" (Japan)
"One of the most powerful humanistic documents the screen
has vet presented"-Film Quarterly
"Kurosowa's most notable achievement in a long list of
masterpiece"-Saturday Review
wed, 9:20-thur, 10:20
INTERNATIONAL INTERNATIONAL
DIRECTOR'S SHAKESPEARE
FESTIVAL NO. 2 FESTIVAL
friday and saturday sunday, monday, and tuesday
Max Ophal's "LOLA MONTES" MAURICE
Oph nW' "LLA MMaurice, Evans and Judith
Orn eSlORY" AndersonKurn"MACBETH"
" Li uIMMORTAL ulSOYoKrsawo's
tuis Bunuel's "THRONE OF BLOOD"
"SIMON OF THE DESERT" (based on 'Macbeth')

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