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May 24, 1972 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-05-24

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY We eaday, May 24, 1972

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SEEK 'SPLIT' DECISION:
Baseball war resumes

NEW YORK .P) -- Organized
baseball and the Major League
Players Association, barely re-
covered from last month's tu-
multuous strike, are back at
each other's throats again.
This time the issue is split
doubleheaders - day and night
games played on the same day
for which the clubs charge sep-
arate admissions. And it is ser-
ious enough to have caused Chub
Feeney, president of the Na-
tional League to fly here for
meetings with Marvin Miller,
executive director of the Play-
ers Association, and John Ca-
herin, negotiator for the major
league owners.
The Associated Press has learn-
ed that the trio will sit down
today to thrash out the issue
which came to a head whenthe
Montreal Expos rescheduled a
game rained out April 19 against
the New York Mets for a day-
night doubileheader on July 1
"The basic agreement says a
split doubleheader may be
scheduled only when there is no
practicable alternative to doing
so, bearing in mind the nature
of the pennant race, seating ca-
pacity of the park and tradition
of split doubleheaders in the
city involved," said Miller.
"There have been no split
doubleheaders in the National
League in the last four years,"

said Miller; "none in New York
and none in Montreal. This is an
outrageous example of ignoring
a contractural agreement,"
John Mcale, president of the
Expos, issued a two-page news
release explaining the Montreal
club's reason for scheduling the
split games July 1.
"Under normal circumstances.
I am oposed to split doublehead-
ers," said McHale. "I think
there were many factors in this
scheduling arrangement which
made it not only feasible, but
preferable."
McHale pointed out that a twi-
night doubleheader on Friday,
June 30 would have been a hard-
ship on Montreal . players just
returning from a road trip which
ends with a night game in Pitts-
burgh June 29.
A twi-nighter on Saturday, July
1 posed a problem because the
teams play a day game on Sun-
day, July 2. A doubleheader
Sunday would have been prohib-
ited because of the night gasue
Saturday.
"I've seen his release, said
Miller. 'He covers every con-
tingency except for the obvio.s
one. Why couldn't they schedule
a day doubleheader on July 1 in-
stead of a day-night one?
McHale's statement grants
that the Expos have created a

WILD'S

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AUDIENCE WHICH IT
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10 tales out of the 100 in Boccaccio's 'Decameron,' Pasolini has
crbated one of the most beautiful, turbulent and uproarious pano-
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of the most obscene, if obscene defines something that is offen-
sive to ordinary concepts of chastity, delicacy and decency, al-
though I'd hardly call the film offensive to morals."
-Vincent Canby, N.Y. Times
STARTS WEDNESDAY
Awarded the Silver Bear, Special
Jury Award 1971 Berlin Film Festival
SELECTED FOR THE NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL
PIER PAOLO PASOLINI'S

chance for an additional gate.
"I don't think the profit rnotive
of a professional sports tea m
should be disregarded in decis-
ions on scheduling," he said.
The Expos pointed out that
they had 'as a courtesy, advised
player representatives Bob Bail-
ey of the Expos and Tom Seaver
of the Mets of our plans."
Miller was aware that t h e
player reps had been informed.
"But they have no right to
waive the contract. We have a
contract to administer and that's
what we plan to do," said Mil-
ler.
More important than the in-
dividual case of the Expos is a
general trend, according to Mil-
ler, of baseball violating or ig-
noring its basic agreement with
the Players Association. There
was the matter of the Boston
Red Sox being required to play
three games in three different
cities in three days last week.
"That's another example," said
Miller. 'The contract says one
day stands will not be resched-
uled 'except to complete t h e
championship schedole. We are
filing a grievance.
"In any other busnesses a
which they are involved, tte
owners are careful to follow their
contractural comsmittmen's
said Miller. "But in baseball,
somehow they think it's diffs'-
ent. They look to provoke."
The Players Association re,'v-
ance over the Red Sox affair
and the split doubleheader mat-
ler, it Feeney. aherin and Mi-
ler art.etnatie to wrkt t out
tuday, will go to Lewis Gill of
Philadelphia, president of the
National Academy of Arbitrtars
and peromanet, arbiraor in
baseball's labor affairs.
"A lucid, tough-minded book."
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"Eminently readable."
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Religion and the Presidency,
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