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May 23, 1972 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-05-23

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, May 23, 1972 --

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesdoy, May 23, 1972

3020 Washtenow Dial 434-1782
TONITE 7 and 9
Best Film
This Year!"
-Judith Cris, NEC JV Today Show
SeS edfor heogt -
t01 t972 CannesFilm Fesva(
A GEORGE ROY HIL-PAUL MONASH PROOUCTH M
"SLAUGHTERHOUSE-
A IVERT

Alibi offered for Davis Nixon meets Soviets

(Continued from Page 3)
on Aug. 6.
Two women who worked with
Davis for the Soledad Brothers
Defense Committee said they
were with her on days preceding
the shooting - days on which
the prosecution says she was
plotting crime.
The defense strategy was re-
vealed after hints that attorneys
might choose not to answer pro-
secution claims that Davis,
deeply in love with convict
George Jackson, plotted to take
hostages from Marin and ex-
change them for her lover's
freedom.
Jackson was one of three
"Soledad Brothers," convicts
charged with murdering a pri-
son guard. His brother Jona-
than was clam in the Marin
shootings. Davis worked for the

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a--Time Magazine

ioledad Brothers Defense Com-
mittee.
Juanita Wheeler, a black em-
ploye of the Communist party
newspaper, People's World,
swore that Davis was her house
guest the week of Aug. 3, 1970
and that she stayed "four or
five days." She said she saw
Davis every day of the visit, in-
cluding the clay of the shoot-
ings.
Wheeler said that on the day
Davis left, previously pegged as
Aug. 7, 1970, she "packed her
bags and put them in the trunk
of my car." Then, she said
Davis went with her to the Peo-
ple's World office, and the edi-
tor drove her to the airport in
Wheeler's car.
The state sought to prove
Davis went to the airport in a
car borrowed by Jonathan Jack-
son and waited to escape along
with the Marin kidnapers and
George Jackson, but took a
flight to Los Angeles only after
learning the plan had misfired.
Asst. Atty. Gen. Albert Harris
Jr. attacked the credibility of
the defensewitnesses on cross-
examination, noting that all
had been active in the "Free
Angela movement w h i c h
sprang up after Miss Davis' ar-
rest.
IO

(Continued from Page 1)
sion, Nixon exchanged toasts
with his hosts and referred indi-
rectly to Vietnam in remarks
about the "responsibiilties of
great powers."
Calling for cooperation to
"pave the way to peace for all
the world," Nixon said "we
should recognize that great nu-
clear powers have a solemn re-
sponsibility to exercise restraint
in any crisis, and to take posi-
tive actions to avert direct con-
frontation."
"We should recognize further
that it is the responsibility of
great powers to influence other
nations in conflict or crisis to
moderate their behavior," he
added.
Soviet willingness to hold the
talks while U.S. planes bombed
North Vietnamese ports has as-
tonished some observers.
However, the Russians appar-
ently are interested in making
progress in arms control and

achieving eventual gains in
trade with western Europe.
In addition, the Soviet Union
is interested in what stance the
United States t a k e s toward
China, which Soviet officials are
viewing more and more as a
threat.
On the agenda for this morn-
ing's talks are Vietnam and
strategic arms li tation.
The crowd that turned out to
watch Nixon's arrival, curious
but not exuberant, far eclipsed
the handful of onlookers who
watched Nixon's motorcade tra-
vel the streets of Peking.
Nixon's visit comes three
months after his trip to China.
Soviet leader Nikita Krush-
chev visited the United States
12 years ago, but no President
has ever made an official visit
toRussia.
The President was accompa-
nied by two charter planes full
of newsmen, each carrying over
180 media people.

U.S. planes bomb Hanoi

(Continued from Page 3)
capital 25 miles to the north that
many allied officers believe is
targeted for a major North Viet-
namese assault.
A government fire base mid-
way between the cities was at-
tacked, and its defenders pulled
out but reoccupied the position
three hours later.
Field reports said heavy air
strikes, including a B52 bombing
raid, were called in on suspected
communist positions just off the
highway and elements of the
road-clearing column followed
the strikes in an attempt, to
drive them back. But then en-
countered heavy fire and retract-
ed to the road.
Around An Loc, continuing

defenses and evacuate the
wounded.
An Loc has been pounded in-
cessantly for the past 46 days in
the heaviest sustained shelling of
the war. The relief column, stall-
ed throughout the early stages
of the siege, pushed to within
sight of the town last week be-
fore attacks against its advance
element and flanks brought it to
a halt.
At Da Nang, an American
merchant ship carrying muni-
tions was damaged Sunday by an
explosion apparently set off by
communist frogmen.
In Washington, a White House
official said that the North Viet-
namese are suffering great mo-
rale problems because of recent

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UNTIL 9:00 P.M.

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J vSO. i S

North Vi e tn am e se attacks US. military actions. The report
thwarted for the fourth day the came in response to an article
Saigon government's efforts to in the New York Times that said
secure Highway 13 into the ruin- the blockading had little appar-
ed town in order to rebuild its ent effect in the North.
War protests continue
(Continued from Page 1) Yesterday's demonstration was
moved in to rout the demon- a followup to Sunday's mass
strators. march and rally in Washington.
The police then began an es-
cort of the remaining protesters Approximately 15,000 people
back to the Lincoln Memorial. gathered at Constitution Ave. to
The demonstrators dispersed, march to the Capitol on Sunday.
ending the day's activities. The march,. which was for the
most part peaceful, was followed
by over 30 speakers, including
HAIRSTYLINGRep. Bella Abzug (D-N.Y.),
Rennie Davis, and Dick Gregory.
AS YOU LIKE IT! The rally was marred by a
NEW TRENDS FOR 1972 police-demonstrator confronta-
TRIMS-SHAGS tion on the Capitol lawn. The
and RAZOR CUTS protesters smashed windows at
Dascola Barbers the justice department and the
Department of Health, Educa-
0 611 E. University tion, and Welfare. There were
* near Michigan Theatre 178 arrests.
Join the Daily Editorial Staff
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