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May 19, 1972 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-05-19

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Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editorials printed in The Michigan Doily express the individual
opinions of the author. This must be noted in all reprints.
FRIDAY, MAY 19, 1972 News Phone: 764-0552
4Mine' the Ad. Bidg.
TODAY HAS been declared a day of solidarity with the
Vietnamese people. Demonstrators will greet the
Regents at their monthly meeting, then march to the
diag for a traditional rally.
In the two weeks since President Nixon announced
his plan to mine the harbors of North Vietnam, protests
have racked cities and college campuses across the nation.
But, throughout this time, Ann Arbor has been strangely
quiet.
Now a group has once again decided to demonstrate
against the war and-equally important for us-against
the University's complicity with that war.
UNIVERSITY FUNDS sponsor war research and are in-
vested in corporations which fuel the war, and the
University's corporal silence on the war lends tacit accept-
ance to it.
It was here, at our University, that electronic sensing
devices which track down Viet Cong guerillas were devel-
oped.
The University, by investing in the large firms which
supply war materials - including Dow and Gulf Oil -
in effect supports the role these corporations play in the
war. If the University would change its stance - as Yale
has - from voting with corporate management on all
matters, then it could exercise at least a symbolic con-
structive influence against the war.
INSTEAD, THE University struggles to maintain a con-
trived neutrality in an age when neutrality does not
exist. One must either support or oppose the war, and
there is no longer any question on where our University
stands.
Join the protests and mine the Administration Bldg.
with balloons to show your support of the anti-war forces.
Then, if you can, go to Washington to bring your protest
to the Pentagon. Tell them once more to "stop the mining,
aid the war!"
-ROSE SUE BERSTEIN
Co-Editor

YAF sends fortht

By NANCY ROSENBAUM
and ARTHUR LERNER
"(ONSERVATIVES CAN defeat
the radicals in student elec-
tions," declare the aoganizers of
the Young Americans for Freedom
(YAF) Student Election Fund.
"Responsible students" need
help to combat the "left financed
entrenched campus radicals
and their revolutionary goals"
-and funds are being sought
across the nation to help turn the
tide.
Already, according to national
YAF Executive Director Wayne
Thornborn, the Student Election
Fund has assisted students in
California, Connecticut, New Mex-
ico, Pennsylvania, Louisiana, and
Tennessee.
YAF has "sought out hundreds
of students and encouraged them
to run," promising campaign as-
sistance.
MONETARY ASSISTANCE has
been limited to avoid violation of
campus election rules, Albert For-
rest, organization development di-
rector, comments.
Instead, YAF has supplied can-
didates with "experienced" lead-
ers to "help with organizational
work," and "in house" printing at
"rock bottom prices."
In addition, YAF sends free
to conservative candidates such
bonuses as "Politics, Campus
Style." "How to Win an Election,"
and "The New Student Politics"-
the "'How To' book with the very
best tools a student government
can follow to gain the support of
the responsible student majority."
Citing campus victories in New
Mexico and Louisiana, YAF re-
ports that conservatives "succ""d-
ed because they told the truth,
they built good campaign organ-
izations and they were aided by
YAF.
YAP literature deplores the
"much touted liberal student
goupss" adicals' "anti-war
campus lobbies," adiows such
groups as the Public Iterest
Research Group in Michigan
PIRGIM).
"Conservative students mustt
present an attractive alternative."
Forrest points out.
BECAUSE THERE is no paid
regional director in the Midwest,
Forrest explains, the campaign has
not been pushed much in this
state.
The Student Election Fund has
not received "as much money as
we had hoped," Thornborn says.
but "we're gearing up for the fall."
Michigans YAP Publicity Ifor-
mation Director Kathryn Augustin
says the state group is more active
in forming the Libertarian Party
and "fighting PIRGIM."
But her husband, State YAP
Chairman Peter McAlpine says
"We're going to get as many of
our students as possible to run."
"We're starting to try and raise
money for it," he adds. "We'll try
as hard as we can."
Mark Ruessman, vice chairnman
of the state YAF, and a Univer-
sity YAP member, asserts the
drive "is news to hins" and that
the campus group's last project
was the "Ping Pong demonstra-
tion"-- against the visiting play-
ers from the People's Republic of
China.

THE NATIONAL and state of-
ficers of the organization are well
informed on the activities of at
least one campus YAF member,
active in University student gov-
ernment.
A statement from state head-
quarters proudly notes that "a
University of Michigan student
recently testified before the House
Internal Security Commission
(HISC-the successor to the House
Un-American Activities Commit-
tee) on the subversive leadership
of many new left groups."
Brad Taylor, '74, a former Stu-
dent Government Council mem-
ber testified before HISC last year
concerning the Student and Youth
Conference for a People's Peace
held on campus last February.
Asked if Taylor was a YAF,
member while on SGC, the cam-
uus YAF chairman. Jeffrey Doan,

he cry
replies, "We have to be discreet
about these things."
In Washington, D.C., Executive
Director Thornborn says he kne
about Taylor's activity and that
"this is the kind of campaign we
want to get into."
YAF PAMPHLETS, listing Strom
Thurmond, John Wayne, Wil-
liam Buckley, Jr., and Ronald
Reagan as members of the group's,
National Advisory Board, report
that YAF "has been in the van-
guard of political activism." Lo-
cal chairman Doan, however, says
the "national office thinks the
campuses are filled with scream-
ing leftists."
"The University chapter is pret-
ty non-political these days," he
adds. "Politics are sort of liberal
per se - because it forces you to

Left's threat to Liberty.

i

Only the name has been changed
NIGHT EDI-OR: JAN BENEDETTI
EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR: ARTHUR LERNER
ASSISTANT NIGHT EDITOR: MERYL GORDON
Summer Staff

BOB ANDREWS ..
ROBERT BARKIN.
JAN RENEPETTI.. .. ..,. ,.
ROSE SUE BERSTEIN
DANIEL BORUS ...
ROBERT CONROW
LINDA DREEBEN
sNNY GAINER
ANDY OOLOINO
MERYL GORDON
HARRY HIRSCH.
TAMMY JACOBS.
SHERRY KASTLE
KAREN LAAKKO.
ELLIOT LEGOW .
ARTHUR LER NER ..
DIANE LEVICK.
pAvID MARGOLICK .
SHEILA MARTIN
JIM O'BRIEN
NANCY ROSENBAUM .
ROLFE TESSEM.. .
PAUL TRAVIS.
GARY VILLANI.. .... .....
JIM WALLACE.
ROBERT WARGO.
DEBORAH WHITING.
CAROL WIECK .. .

Associate Spots Editor
Night Editor
Night Editor
.. ...Co-Editor
. Sport's Night Editor
Books Editor
. Night Editor
Photography Eio
R.. isiiness Mnger
Assistant Night Editor
Display Manager
....Night Editor
Circulation Manager
Classified Manager
Sports Editor
Co-Editor
Assistant Night Editor
Photographer
General Business Assistant
Science Editor
Assistant Night Editor
Photographer
Night Editor
Photogr pher
Photographer
Photographer
Circulation Assistant
General Business Assistant

Letters w The aGil
RAP r pped ta1 it would seem to msec
that whoever is running s h
To The Daily: have evinced a strong prior
DURING the March 17 Regents
meeting, the student sitting behini est in the organization by1
me managed to utter something done some work for it. The
during the meeting about PIRGIM candidate admitted that hei
being a "leftist organization." I done any work for PIRGIM
turned around to see this nattily had anyone on the RAP sI
dressed fellow sporting this fun- simply cannot understsard
ny looking button. I asked him these people campaigned tot
what the button said and he re-
plied that it was' an "Ashbrook'' GIM office, when they have
button. This had to be Brad Tay- absolutely nothing to get it
lor. lished, are opposed to its
After the meeting, I queried him existence, and whose onlyr
as to why, if he opposed PIRGIM, seems to be a desire to ri
was his political party the organization into the grout
Responsible Alternative Party -Fred Wolgel
(RAP) running a slate for t h e
PIRGIM offices. He replied face-
tiously that they wanted PIRGIM Letters to The Daily s
to work for establishing "right- be mailed to the Editorial
to-work" laws and the abolishment rector or delivered to M
of tteminimusmsvage. 'nen he Rafferty in the Studentl
denied being associated with the lications businese4 office ir
RAP slate, and claimed that he Michigan Daily building.
wasn't oing to support it. This ters should be typed, do
was ratherdbioussitliiteThi spaced and normally sh
was rather dubious, as it elicited a not exceed 250 words.
5asp from his conmpanion, whom, Editorial Directors reserve
it turned out, was running f o r right to edit all letters
PIRGIM office on the RAP slate. mitted.
In voting for candidates to PIR -

ritical
ould
inter-
'aving
RAP
hadn't
I; nor
ite. I
w b y
r PIR-
done
esta'o-
v e r y
motive
un the
nd.
hould
I Di-
ary
Pub-
the
Let-
uble-
hould
The
the
sub-

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