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August 13, 1974 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-08-13

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

m
Tuesday, August 13, 1974

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DIMLY Tuesday, August 13, 1974

I

Council discusses
surplus in budget
(Contited from Page)it Employes (AFSCME), L o c al
Following discussion of the 369.
two reports r council annroved a

Framed
Artist Michael Pellus is not peering out from behind an empty picture frame. Rath
trying to prevent a portrait from falling as a gust of wind knocked down his display
fair in Chicago yesterday.
COMAPLAINTI

two-ear union contract with
city employes.
Councilwoman Kathy Koza-
chenko (HRP-Second Ward),
the only member voting against
-, approval, objected to the "blat-
antly sexist" agreement with
the American Federation of
State, County, and Municipal
Fodprices
to rise soon
7sEW ORtLEANS t' - Agri-
citre Secretary Earl Butz said
vesterday that food prices may
soar by as much as 14 per cent
this year, 2 per cent more than
he estimated earlier.
"We predicted a 12 per cent
rise above the 1973 level, but
we will probably have to revise
AP Photo that upward a few percentage
points to 14 per cent," he told
a news conference preceding an
er, he is address before the World Poul-
at an art try Congress.
"MOST OF the rise will de-
peed on wage rates in the food
processing and packaging in-
dustry," he said.
Turning to a more optimistic
forecast, Butz said that in spite
of the serious drought in the
Midwest, "the impact of the
drought has been overstated.
"The d r o u g h t is serious,
there's no question about that,"
he said. "But fortunately our
wheat crop this year is better
than last year's, though our
corn corp is down."
A USDA cr01 report, issued
yesterday, estimated that this
year's corn crop will be down
12 per cent from last year's and
the soybean crop down 16 per
cent.
Butz, later told the Poultry
Congress, "We've got a report
coming out today, but that was
compiled before the rains came
last week. At the worst, this
year's grain crop will be the
second largest grain crop on
record."

*. ..missing oti
on some of the
DAILIES becaul
of deivery
mistakes ?

"TIIERE IS rampant inequal-
ity in the scales of pay between
traditionally 'male' and 'female'
jobs," she said. "For example
a clerk-typist starts at only
$6,614, while a laborer starts at
$9,172.
Council ended last night's ses-
sion by deferring further action
on the controversial Packard-
Platt Plaza site plan.
A i e m b e r of Residents
Against Packard Platt Plaza
(RAP 3) has filed suit against
the city charging that council
did not adhere to the proper
procedures when approving a
site plan for the shopping
center.
Also, Jones charged that the
comproise site plan, which
council finally approved last
winter after lengthy debate dif-
fers slightly from the site plan
on file in the city planning de-
partment.
Both Jones and Councilwoman
Colleen McGee (D-First Ward)
voiced objections about the re-
corded minutes .of the January
28 meeting during which coun-
cil approved the compromise
site plan.
"There are differences be-
tween the recorded minutes and
the (taped) transcripts,' said
Jones.
ABA chief
says Nixon
conceded
culpability
(Continiiedl team Page 3)
on the opening of the 97th an-
nual convention of the 18,000
member association.
"I don't think just because
he's out we ought to start yell-
ing and say, 'Let's go and get
the last mile' without taking a
cautious look at it," Smith said.
Smith said the decision should
be left with Special Prosecutor
Leon Jaworski. He added he
would oppose any congressionl
action barring Jaworski from
seeking an indictment.
GILBERT Graham, a Sns
Francisco lawyer, said he had
submitted a resolution declar
lng the prosecution of Nixon
should e decided "solely on a
determination of whether he has
committeed a crime for which
he could be convicted"
After being debated by the
Resolutions Committee, the
measure will ga to the full con-
vention for possible debate
In his news conference, Smith
said, "Amnesty certainly is a
consideration that might merit
the upport of this government.
I do not yet favor that."
HE SAID if amnesty is
granted Nixon, it probably
would have to be extended to
others in the Watergate cover-
up "from top to bottom,"
In his opening address to the
association Smith said he fav-
ored a form of amnesty for
those who refuted to fight in
the Vietnam war.
The nation will remain divid-
ed until it deals compassion-
ately with "the ongoing living
tragedy" of those young Amer-
cans who are foced to live in
exile or underrounsd because
they were draft -evaders,' he
said.
The delegates applauded when
sSmith said he doesnt think that
a citizen of a free country

should be forced to fight in
war "that neither he nor his
elected representatives chose
to initiate or declare."

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