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June 26, 1974 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-06-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I 11 'V I W i' I M YY

(Continued from Pagel)
In January, despite the fact
that it had no cash reserve,
New Morning began to publish
the weekly Free Press-a pro-
ject which appears to have been
a money-losing enterprise.
The first issue of the Free
Press, for example, contained
roughly 85 column inches of ad-
vertising-not including several
presumably "dead," or free,
ads for New Morning activities.
AT THE FREE Press' highest
ad rate, this would have yielded
approximately $340 in revenue.
Most advertisers, h o w e v e r,
Council defeats
bond issue plan
(Continued from Page 3)
"To blatantly disregard the
law like this would be appal-
ling," said Councilwoman Col-
teen McGee (D-First Ward).
The Republican councilmem-
hers argued that it is the re-
sponsibility oftthe county elec-
tion officials to decide the legal-
ity of placing the bond issue on
the ballot.
"IF WE PASS a resahition to
place the proposal on the bal-
lot, it is not illegal," said Coun-
cilman Louis Belcher (R-Fifth
Ward). "Whether the county
clerk will accept it ir not is
another question."
McCormick contended that
there was a "chance" the Coun-
ty Board of Canvassers might
allow the issue onto the ballot.
"This may not get on the bal-
lot," said Councilman Hobert
Henry (R-Third Ward). "B u t
passing the resolution will indi-
cate our support of the issue."

would have been subject to
much lower contract rates that
scale down to a little over 25
per cent of the highest ad price.
A Free Press spokesperson
told a Daily reporter that over
10,000 copies of each issue are
circulated at 25 cents each, but
David Fenton of the Ann Arbor
Sun claims that he was told by
the Free Press' Detroit dis-
tributor that only about 300 are
actually sold.
A recent spot check with sev-
eral newsstands that sell the
Free Press suggests that Fen-
ton's figure is closer to the
newspaper's actual paid circu-
lation. Consequently, the Free
Press' revenue from newsstand
sales appears to be negligible.
The Free Press also offers
mail subscriptions, but accord-
ing to the Post Office has not
applied for bulk mailing status.
Therefore, income from this
source must also be negligible.
OUTSIDE estimates place the
revenue from the first Free
Press issue at around $400.
Meanwhile, the newspaper
faced s e v e r a 1 considerable
debts:

,Yv I IIIIE
-Printing a n d platemaking
for 10,000 copies of an eight-
page newspaper, two pages of
which were in two colors. One
local printer estimates the Free
Press' expenses here alone at
about $360.
-News servide and syndicated
column fees-probably a b o u t
$50.
-Typesetting expenses-again
probably about $50.
ALTHOUGH New Morning will
not reveal its finances, based
on these estimates, the Free
Press appears to have been los-
ing at least $110 an issue in
January.
At the same time, the sudden
payments by Newsreel to New
Morning began. Newsreel, for
example, paid Community Me-
dia Project $200 for space rental
-the first such rent payment
recorded in the Newsreel rec-
ords, even though the organiza-
tion had occupied space in the
New Morning building for over
a year.
NEWSREEL placed 44 column
inches of advertising in the first
four issues of the Free Press.
At the newspaper's rate for
MICIG AN 1

III E1 'WARDROSE.
community service organiza- *
tions of $2.60 per column inch,
Newsreel's bill should have been
just over $114.
Instead, their records state,
Newsreel paid the Free Press the
$459. Apparently.Newsreel made
a donation during the first four
weeks of the winter term of $345 Of
to help sustain the financially foul
ailing Free Press,_ A
"SINCE NEW MORNING is
incorporated as a non-profit,
educationally-oriented m e d i a
collective, the donations them-
selves do not violate any cur-
rent University rule or even the
pending rules proposed by the r
executive officers to the Re-
gents," Chikofsky stated.
Copyright {b1974,
The Michigan Daily
AUDITIONS
FOR THE RESIDENT AND
TOURING COMPANIES OF
THE
a new improvised musical revue.
MONDAY, July 1st-10 a.m.
MICHIGAN UNION, Anderson Room D
PLEASE PREPARE A SONG
- - --N-Y-JUNE-30- -30-

BOWLING UNION
STAND Open During
STYLING Exams & Break

yeedcrzi~%e OaZCzZdzzazazz,0o j Orkdtr
* an+d§4 3 x zxes.*
800
june26-9 e.q. aud.

MONDAY, JULY 1 TUESDAY,.JULY 2
7:30 pm S6 (pavilion), $4 (lawn) 8:00 pm $6 (pavilion). $4 (lawn)
BLUE JOI~nCA!IH
OYSTER ORCHESTRA
CULT a RcTu1I~mmn
n 0%Somber
WED. JULY 3 a pa FRI. JULY 5 thru SUN. JULY 7
$6-(pavition) $4 (lawn) 8 pm (7:30 Sunday)
$7 (pavilion), $5 (lawn)
CHEECH IFIPIAIK
CHOflG WlyiI preston
MON. JULY 8 & TUES. JULY 9 TUESDAY, JULY 16 8:00 pm
7:30 pm $7 (pavilion), $5 (lawn) $6 (pavilion), $4 (lawn)
TUES L AWN SOLD OUT
MONDAY, JULY 22 7:30 pm TUE S. JULY 23 & WE D. JULY 24
$6 (pavilion), $4 (lawn) 8 pm. $7 (pavilion), $5 (lawn)
Taylor
LindaRonsta
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT
Pine Knob Music Theatre Fisher Theatre Box Off.
(10am-- 8 pm daily) (Mon.-Sat., 9 am - & pm)
AT ALLBirmingham Northtand
Woodward & John R / Westboarn / Eastland / Wonderland
Mail a check or money order to (name of concert). Pine Knob Muric Theatre,
Box P1033, Birmingham, 48012, Enclose a stamped self-addressed, zip-coded
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL (313) 647-??94

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