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June 01, 1974 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-06-01

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5aturday. Jurie 1, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

JAtSA I+avya

i B Beck vies for school board post

tditor's nots: trid Beck i -
one o tocandidate; ho are
b1kdby the Pitta Rightsi
x 5 Party inthe shoot hoarid eIi-
tion coming 'une 10. Her can-
ciiate statement is below.
As a luman Rights Party can-
didate I endorse, and when
elected will strise to implement,
the IIP pl. tform.
In this regard I will be work-
ing for the establishment of:
comtunity control of education,
student rights, public financing
of education (through the adop-
tion of a steeply graduated in-
core tax), the rights of public
employes (to form and join
unions, etc., and to strike), and
calling for the elimination of
ageism, racism, sexism, and
tracking in our public schools.
UIITIMATELY, I hope to see
the establishment of an educa-
tional process which is an in-
tegral part of a wholely trans-
formed society. I believe that
struggle for the humanization of
the educational institution (en-
coutraging people to be more
rather than to have more) will
contribute to the emergence of
a social system which serves,
rather than exploits, its mem-
bers.
I am tired of "Ivory Tower"
~^- school boards who demonstrate
AP Photo their contempt for the public by
y u m s1ignoring it. This attitude is un-
t m USt derscored by the recent board
Four-year-old Lowell Anderson II of Lorain, Ohio displays decision to implement Plan F,
despite fervent community op-
amused tolerance yesterday as an Associated Press photo- position. I am tired of the
grapher takes his picture. Lowell was sitting in the sun in dehumanized, cost- accountant
Lorain's Lakeview Park. mentality, which considers our
DivorCe still legally prohibited

p)1t1g people as "itantities"
and "end products," to be
'studied," "molded," "evalu-
ated ""shaped," "tracked,"
and otherwise manipulated by
the elite.
Public schools are not fac-
tories dealing in assembly-line
proudction. Young people can-
not be forced to conform to
''ittality control' standirds of
urhat they should be. They
should be encouraged to recog-
nize what they are, and what
they might become, so that our
young people will be able to
develop their human potential in
ways that are personally fulfill-
ing.
IRP supports student rights
in education. Central to this po-
sition is our conviction that
young people should have a
determinative role in education
and thus a decisive voice in the
shaping of their own destiny. In
this same vein, IP is com-
mitted to the right of students
to participate in school board
decisions. The present "ad-
visory" role permitted students
is mere tokenism.
I believe that, by and large,
education in the Ann Arbor
schools is sexist. Instead of
helping to socialize women nto
subservient positions in society,
schools should be actively work-
ing to end such discrimination.
Students should be encouraged
to view all forms of sexual ex-
pression, including gayness, as
personal variations on an essen-
tially human theme-i.e. LOVE
-and thus, something to be
positively valued.
HRP also believes that rac-
ism, both individual and insti-

tititonal, is it cintinuing feature
of educatitin in Ann Arbttr. We
support the right of third world
peoples to have and to control
their tiwn nrtigrams, and also to
be isclided in the general cur-
ricl11m1.
I SUPI'Oiwr the i I' plt
forn on ed'ication. I helped
write it. I know there will be
political Onnortunists ewho will
seize upon this complex docu-
ment and, attaching their own
interpretations, attempt to ma-
nitpulate public opinion igainst
me.
I believe the Ann Arbor vtoters
have had their fill of political
"iirty tricks." I will welcome
the opportunity to personally
appearb bfore any group, at any
time dilcing the catnotien, to
explain and or discuss IIRP's
position on the issues.
My twi sons are both enrolled
in the Ann Arbor public schools.
Thus I have a very personal in-
terest in Pitucation in Ann Ar-
bor. 'Te{t-hig is my personal
career choice and I have been a
University teaching fellow for
the past two years. I have at-
tended a wide variety of schools,
both in Europe and in America,
and these experiences contrib-
ute greatly to my conviction
that the educational system
must be changed. Education has
been a dominant theme of my
life for as long as I can re-
member.
I came to Ann Arbor in 1970
and worked for Michigan Bell
Telephone Company before re-
suming a doctoral program in
Comparative Literature at the
University of Michigan. I live
at 1706 McIntyre.

for Latin
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina
01) - Diamonds are forever in
much of Latin America, and
couples trying to divorce are
still crossing borders, telling lies
and going broke.
Despite new laws in Italy, the
Vatican view toward divorce
prevails in Brazil, Argentina,
Chile, Colombia and Paraguay,
among others. An Associated
Press survey found little imme-
diate prospect for change.
RESOURCEFUL p e o p 1 e
can sometimes despouse in
those heavily Roman Catholic
countries. But it's not easy.
In Chile, for example, some
couples can arrange annul-
ments by getting witnesses to
say their marriage was per-
formed in the wrong municipal-
ity and therefore was never leg-
al.
Argentines and Brazilians
may legally separate but not
remarry. Courts divide up pro-
perty, and fortunes can change
hands over tricky inheritance
and ownership regulations.
IF DESPERATE, a partner
can fly to Trinidad where di-
vorce is granted for adultery
only. Special investigators can
even supply an actor to pose as
the erring wife or husband if the
real one won't cooperate.
But then foreign divorces
aren't legal back home.
L a t i n Americans keenly
watched the Italian divorce
referendum this month and
when divorce was upheld, there
was renewed talk of reform.
IN BRAZIL, with 103 million
inhabitants making it the larg-
est Catholic country in the
world, divorce bills lie dormant
in the Senate Judicial Com-
mittee.
Sen. Nelson Carneiro, an ad-
vocate of 4ivorce, says the Ital-
ian vote "will give us great
hope and will provike radical
change..."
Still, the new Protestant pres-
ident, Gen. Ernesto Geisel, has
made no mention of divorce
.And Carneiro failed to have the

American Catholics

issue put to referendum in
1974 legislative elections.
ARGEN'TINE lawmak-
ers say word has come from the
highest levels that the Peronist
bloc will not consider divorce
this year. One reason, they say,
is that President Juan Peron
plans to visit Pope Paul IV.
Peron legalized divorce -and
prostitution - in 1954 while
fighting the church, and that
was one reason he was tossed
out the following year. Some Ar-
gentinians shed their spouses
before repeal a year later, but
many who dragged their feet
are still lamenting their iner-
tia.
"I'm sure it is only a matter
of time," said a lawyer in Ar-
gentina, a nation heavily set-
tled by Italian Catholics.

"IF THEY can do it in Rotue,
they certainly can do it in Bue-
nos Aires."
President - elect Alfonso Lo-
pez Michelson of Colombia has
promised a form of divorce law,
but sources there say it would
not apply to religious marri-
ages. Only a small percentage
of weddings are by civil law
alone.
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