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June 14, 1973 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-06-14

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Page Ten

THE SUMMER DAILY

Thursday, June 14, 1973

Pcsge Ten THE SUMMER DAILY Thursday. June 14. 1973

Ehrlichman said to
have OKd burglary

Former prosecutor
may have history of
defrauding clients

(Oantnued from Page 3)
campaign were destroyed shortly
after the Watergate raid. He
said he destroyed them on legal
advice that came from G. Gor-
don Liddy, who was later con-
victed as the leader of the wire-
tapping crew.
Stans, who is finance chair-
man of the Nixon re-election
campaign, testified at the Sen-
ate's televised Watergate hear-
ings that he was only a political
cashier who raised money but
wasn't responsible for campaign
tactics.
The sharp questioning that sur-
rounded Stans' testimony brought
the first bickering of the 10-day
old hearings-between Sen. Sam
Ervin, the Democratic commit-
tee chairman, and Sen. Edward
Gurney, a Republican.
T H E EXCHANGE between
_Gurney and Ervin began with
the Florida senator sasing he
didn't want the Aerican public
to "get the impression that the
questioning of any senator here
has found favor by other sena-
tors and I, for one, have not
appreciated the harassment of
this witness by the chairman in
the questioning that has just
finished. I think this Senate com-
mittee ought to act in foirness.'
Ervin responded: "I'm sorry
that my distinguished friend from
Flo'-ida does not approve of my
methods of questioning the wit-
ness. I'm inst an old country
lawyer and I don't know the fine
way to do it. I just have to do it
my way."
'he hearing room burst ito
applause.
The completion of Stan's testi-
mon cleared the way for the ap-
pearance today of Jeb Magruder.
Sotrces close to the Senate in-
vestigation said yesterday former
White Itoise aide Gordon Strach-
an is also ready to tell the com-
mittee about his role as link
between I R. (Bob) Haldeman
and President Nixon's re-election
committee.
HALDEMAN has said under
oath that Strachan picked tip
$350,000 in cash from the cam-
paign committee for delivery to
himi.
The committee wants to hear
Strachan's testimony about that
transaction and also about the
contents of documents and re-
ports he received from campaign
officials for delivery to Halde-
man.
Special Watergate prosecutor
Archibald Cox is studying a re-
quest from the committee to rush
through an immunity grant for
Strachan that would enable him
tb give the committee his testi-
mony before Haldeman appears
at the hearings.
IN A BIZARRE and interesting
sidelight to Watergate, legal re-
searcher Sherman Skolnick re-
ported yesterday that there was
an elaborate scheme linking the
Watergate affair to the crash of
a United Air Lines jetliner.

Skolnick was a witness at a
special session of the National
Transportation Safety Board. The
board conducted hearings in Feb-
rtiarv and March into the Dec. 8
crash of a United jet at Chicago's
Midway Airport. Skolnick was
not allowed to testify then be-
cause the board said he did not:
offer proof of the sabotage
charges.
le contends the motive for the
crash was linked to 12 passengers
whom he says were directly con-
nected to Watergate. Ehr ihm n
Nixon announces 60
day freeze on pices

continued fram Page 3)
default judgment against him."
Another source said that Wil-
liams, "always uses money that
people leave with him. He has
been operating on the edge of
what is considered ethical in the
legal profession."
A check with the Grievance
Board of the State Bar revealed
that Williams had been "repri-
manded" on Aug. 27, 1971 for
"professional misconduct," the
nature of which was not divulged.
WHILE the reprimand does not
affect the status of the recipient's
license, or his right to practice
any, it is an extremely rare pelt-
cedure.
The allegations against Wil-
liams cover both the years lie

spent in private practice, and
the time he served in the prose-
cutor's office. While wIth the
county, Williams handled a large
portion of the prosecution's case
against convicted murderer JohT
Norman Collins.
ONE SOURCE said that Wil-
liams ,borrowed "heavily from
defense attorneys" while prose-
cutor in order to pay off debts.
Another source said that Del-
hey was aware of William's ac-
tivities and "knew he should
have fired himyears before."
Delhey said last night that he
had made investigations of com-
plaints filed against Williams
while the latter was a prosecu-
tor, and that the probes showed
no criminal activity.

(Cont ui'ed from age1 u
Nixon asserted that his tough-
er anti - inflation blueprint "will
deal with the rise in the cost of
living without jeopardizing your
prosperity or your job." He or-
dered a thorough audit of the
books of companies that have
raised prices more than 1.5 per
cent above January ceilings. If
the boosts were not justified by
rising costs, he promised, "the
prices will be rolled back."
The government had ordered
no rollbacks since Phase 3 went
into effect in January.
NIXON'S ACTIONS did not af-
fect present controls on wages,
interest and dividends. Rents
free from controls in January,
will remain free of restraint.
Phase 4, tie said, "will not be
designed to get us permanently
into a controlled economy." He
said the aim will be "to, return
us as quickly as possible to the
free market system."
In the week leading tip to the
President's speech Nixon had
been under increasing pressure
to tighten the economic con-
trols. The Senate held up action
yesterday on a proposal to re-
store strong controls until after
the President's speech. T h e
AFL-CIO had called for freeze
on everything but wages.
N I X O N SAID he decided
against a wage freeze because
Daily Official Blletin
Thursday, June 14
DAY CALENDAR
Rgets Public Discussion: 2:3t
pm.: Public comments, 4 pm.. both in
Regents' Rm., Admin. Bldg.
computing center: J. Cederquist.
'Isput/Output I," 413 P-A Bldg., 3
Carillon Recital: Presented as part
of 1973 Carillon Conf.: Baird Carillon.
BMT, noon-1 pm. and 7-a pm.
American Heritage Night: foods. of
New England. League cafeteria, 5 pm
Dance Dept.: Gay Delanghe's "Limb
Literal or Leg Technology vs. Arm
Technology." Barbour Gym, 5 pm.
GENERAL NOTICES
Attention Students: 'June 21, 4 pm
is last day pforSpring-Summer Term
when the Registrar's Office wilt ausw
refund for a 50 r cent Withdrawa

"wage settlements reached un-
der the rules of Phase 3 have not
been a significant cause of the
increase in prices."
le promised there would be no
freeze on wages as long as set-
tlements "continue to be respon-
sible and noninflationary."
During Phase 4, he said, new
rules "will recognize the need
for wages and prices to be treat-
ed consistently with one anoth-
er."
AFl-CIO PRESIDENT George
Meany, one of the severest cri-
tics of Nixon's economic poli
cies, withheld icmmnediate com-
ment.
Meany has repeatedly com-
plained that rising prices have
far outstripped worker's wage
gains and without effective con-
trols on prices, profits and inter-
est rates, there can be no equity
for the workingman.
In announcing the prize freeze,
Nixon said:
"THIS FREEZE will hold
prices at levels no higher than
those charged during the first
eight days of June. It will cover
all prices paid by consumers. The
only prices not covered will be
those of unprocessed agricultural
products at the farm level and
rents."
Party Tomorrow
with the
ROCKETS
at the
AMERICAN LEGION HALL
S. Main at Paauline
$2.50 Adm.
Covers Band & ol the
Beer You Can Drink
Mixed Drinks Available
DOORS OPEN AT 8:30
A Life Enerqy Prod.

Fri.-Man.- Sat.-Sun.
Tues. at at 1-3-5-
7-9 P.M. 7-9 P.M.
"NOT ONLY A FIRST - RATE PRODUCTION, BUT ALSO
THEATRE OF AMAZING FEROCITY!"
Vincent Canby N.Y. Times
"'A CLASSIC!" Winsten, N.Y Post
"***/2*!" Claire Bloom
"TRIUMPHS!"-Kathleen Carroll N Y. Dalv New
He -,is the Hmaster
He'icealled a husxtmd
She isthep6-y dihla
Sh4s ca11ed a lide
Clire Bloomt
Sjr alty~bGistaij Ierlanym.s-PndedbyIlmilsed Ekiiw
ettedl ear fktarlaad a..." inC "fi.ia1yt iM8v #. Aanax o -
SNan4R'W

SUMMERTIME BLUES?
Its the season when you least want to be bothered by
medical problems, but if you do need care reemmaer that Health
Service is open year round and whether or not you take summer
classes. People enrolled within the previous12 months and non-
student spouses of eligible patients may use all Health Service
facilities for a small additional fee.
The followinq clinics are now an slightly reduced summer
schedules so call in for exact hours: Alleey, Gynecoloay and
Contraception, Immunization, Physical Therapy, and Problem
Pregnancy Counselinq.
If you have a problem, question or complaint about Health
Service call
Weeays 763-4384
10 am to

OFFICIALLY OPENING'
FRIDAY, June 15
OPENING SALE ON PANTS-$5 A PAIR
(a. Smile, Braten, Live ins, etc.)
FASHIONS FOR MEN AND WOMEN
SHIRTS AND BLOUSES PANTS
HALTER TOPS BELTS
DRESSES PURSES
SKIRTS JEWELRY
Also Miscellaneous Eccentricities like Lead-
ed Glass Planters, Old-Fashioned Lamps,
Tapestries
1317 S. University
WHERE A REGRESSION IN FASHION IS AN ADVANCE IN STYLE

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