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June 05, 1973 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-06-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesday, June 5, 1973

THE SUMMER DAILY Page Nine
'Red Menace' worries
old Minutemen boss

By IARGARET P. RICHARDS
NORBORNE, Mo. (UPI) -
Robert Bolivar DePugh is a
man with a cause-anti - com-
munism - that three years in a
federal prison have done little to
temper.
"I think there is more danger
from communism now than there
used to be," the former head of
the right - wing Minute-men or-
ganization told an interviewer.

that serves as plant and office
for Biolab, Inc., his veterinary
pharmaceutical concern..
FELLOW townspeople describ-
ed DePugh as "a kind of loner,"
but said they are glad to have
him back in town. They said he
probably would take no substan-
tial part in community affairs
because "he never did before."
R e s .i d e n t s questioned
believed no one but DePugh was

"I think there is more danger from com-
munism now than there used to be."
--Robert Bolivar DePugh
former Minuteman leader

Face of war
A young boy clings to his father at a village near Loc Ninh -
the Viet Cong stronghold in South Vietnam. The boy's silver
jewelry marks him as a member of a mountain tribe which is
racially distinct from the Vietnamese. Western newsmen recently
visited the area for the first time.
fe It'Sadifficu e in
wartime Phnom Penh
PHLNOM PENH, Cambodia 6P) - A Swedish diplomat fills his
bathtub every night at Phnom Penh's leading hotel to make sure
he'll have water for shaving and washing in the morning.
An American diplomat's wife uses a flashlight to scan antiques in
bathtub every night in Phnom Penh's leading hotel to make sure
Cambodian shopgirls giggle.
GAS STATIONS are open three days a week on a staggered basis,
with each car allowed up to three gallons. The lines around the sta-
tions are so long it can take almost a day to get to the front of the
line.
Phnom Penh's teeming refugee population and its poor are least
affected by the periodic lack of water and electricity and chronic
gasoline shortages. They can't afford cars, air conditioners, electric
lights or running water anyway.
It is the middle class and wealthy Cambodians and Westerners
who are suffering. Many can't sleep because the night air is just
too hot and stagnant without air conditioning.
SOME CAN'T wash or cook because the tap is dry. Others nave to
walk or take bicycle-powered taxis because their gas tank is empty.
There is a thriving black market in gasoline, run by women
who wait in line with colored plastic jugs, then sell to wealthy Cam-
bodians and Westerners.
When air conditioning shuts off, some people have tried moving
beds to porches or opening windows, but mosquitos can be worse
than the heat indoors.
THIS IS wartime Phnom Penh in June 1973.
DEMO SALE on quality
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336 S. STATE

DEPUGH, who was released
from prison April 30 on parole
which restricts his travels to
western Missouri, said President
Nixon's trips to Moscow and
Peking only confirm the Com-
munist plan for takeover of the
United States.
"Nikita Khrushchev once
said, 'We must lull the western
world to sleep.' We are being
lulled to sleep," DePugh said.
Despite his fears, DePugh is
uncertain whether he will at-
tempt to revive the Minutemen,
an organization that received
much publicity in the 1960s as the
conservative version of the Black
Panther Party, but whose mem-
bership was generally conceded
to be small.
THE 0 R G A N I Z A T I 0 N
has been without leadership
since DePugh and his second in
command, Walter Patrick Pey-
son, were apprehended July 12,
1961, near Truth or Conse-
quences, N. M., where authori-
ties seized an arsenal of wea-
pons at a house allegedily used
by the Minutemen.
The two had gone under-
ground after nine Minutemen
were indicted in Seattle in April,
1968, on charges of conspiring
to rob three banks. DePugh
never was brought to trial on
the charge but was sentenced to
four years in 1970 for bond
jumping and nine concurrent
10-year terms for federal gun-
law violations.
DePugh, 50, appeared relax-
ed, happy and friendly as he sat
behind his desk in an inner room
of the green house-like structure

ever a Minuteman in Norborne.
DePugh worries about the
fact that he talks freely with
reporters regarding potentially
sensitive matters in relation to
his status as a parolee. But he
talks anyway because "I put
principles ahead of the mater-
ial values of life."
He revealed no plans for con-
tact with Minutemen except for
a mailing last he intends to use
for the sale of a book he has
written on prison reform.
THE WATERGATE a f f a i r,
however, does give him some
ideas. He thinks it has opened
the way for third-party politics
once again in the United States
"Sixty days ago I would have
said the possibility of a third
party that could challenge the

Democrats or Republicans was
zero. But now, millions of peo-
ple must be, turned off by both
major parties."
DePugh sees poetic justice
for some of those involved in
Watergate.
"JOHN MITCHEll, f o r i e r
attorney general, boasted four
years ago that he would destroy
the Minutemen, so there's a kind
of poetic justice in his present
predicament."
His book on prison reform is
an outgrowth of DePugh's years
in the Atlanta penitentiary. He
said prison reform "isn't my
field," but that it would be help-
ful for someone "who has been
on the inside" to record his views
and experiences. "No one who
hasn't been in prison can possi-
bly know what it is like. War-
dens, chaplains, social workers
may think they do, but they
don't."
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