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August 10, 1979 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1979-08-10

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Page 8-Friday, August 10, 1979-The Michigan Daily
GOV'TMA Y GUARANTEE LOANS TO NO. 3 AUTO FIRM
UAW rejects Chrysler wage-freeze plan

From Wire Reports
The government and the United Auto
Workers Union (UAW) yesterday
rejected key portions of Chrysler
Corp's scheme to return to financial
health, but both said they are willing to
consider ways to save the company.
In Washington, Treasury Secretary
William Miller ruled out the $1 billion in
direct federal payments against future
tax credits the No. 3 auto company is
seeking.
In Chicago, the UAW's Chrysler
Council overwhelmingly voted against
the firm's urgent request for a two-year
wage and benefit freeze.

Miller said the administration may
recommend that Congress approve
loan guarantees for Chrysler, which
has suffered heavily in the auto in-
dustry's big-car sales slump and has
been unable to turn out large numbers
of comparatively hot selling small cars.
Such aid in the form of loan guaran-
tees would fall far short of Chrysler's
request for cash payments from the
government of $500 million this year
and next year, and a two-year delay in
meeting federal anti-pollution standar-
ds.
Chrysler is seeking the federal
assistance, officials say, to allow it time

to introduce a new set of automobiles
which would be smaller and make the
firm more competitive in the fuel-
conscious domestic auto market.
In Chicago, union officials said all but
six of 245 delegates at an emergency
Chrysler convention voted against
Chrysler's request for a two-year wage
and benefit freeze and in favor of a
resolution giving union bargainers
broad authority to tailor the new con-
tract to Chrysler's weakness.
"Chrysler is a sick corporation, but
there is no reason for the illness to be
fatal," the resolution said. "With the
proper medicine, mainly large amounts

of cash plus better management
decision-making, the corporation can
be brought back to good health."
UAW President Douglas Fraser
declined to speculate on the form
special union concessions to Chrysler
might take in contract talks underway
for 750,000 U.S. auto workers at
Chrysler, General Motors Corp. and
Ford Motor Co. The current contract at
the Big Three plants expires Sept. 14.
"We say that we can't make a
judgement on that until we see the Ford
and General Motors settlement this
year," Fraser said. "Obviously, the
bargaining committee has flexibility."

A schools' Black English
(Continued from Page 3 count in teaching standard English.
having emotional or learning Although the school board originally
disabilities. U.S. District Court Judge voted to appeal the case, the vote was
Charles Joiner ruled last month that declared invalid when it appeared the
while the Black English dialect was not board may have violated portions of the
a barrier with these particular state Open Meetings Act. The board
children, it could become a barrier if reversed its decision during the second
not considered in teaching. He gave the vote.
Ann Arbor school board 30 days to BAILEY, WHO also was consulted in
devise a plan to take the dialect into ac- developing the plan, said that if other
EVERY SUMMER THE CREAM OF AMERICAN YOUTH
GOES TO SUMMER CAMP-
AND THE REST GO TO CAMP NORTHSTAR.

plan draws local support
schools were added to the program Dannemiller. Although Joiner's
more teachers would be able to learn deadline for the plan was Monday, the
the techniques and the program would board's attorneys obtained a one-week
not have to be repeated if it proves suc- extension.
cessful. Implementation of the plan will cost
The plan presented Wednesday night the school district an estimated $41,915,
was devised by school Superintendent including $32,415 for materials.
Harry Howard, Associate Superinten- Dannemiller said the plan is feasible
dent Lee Hansen, and Assistant financially. "We'll have to figure what
Superintendent Robert Potts. It calls we'll cut," she said, adding that she ap-
for a 20-hour instructional program for proves of the plan's focus on teachers,
King Elementary School staff and a instead of children.
reinforcement phase consisting of "a Thomas Pietras, Ann Arbor public
series of three-four-hour follow-up schools director of language arts, said
seminars." Also, language arts con- th pln"drseteesnia
sultants will be hired to help teachers the plarnre adresse sthen enti
and "high-need" students, according to charge the judge has given us."
the plan. Peitras, who will serve as a member
Howard said the plan would not be of the instructional team for the
implemented at other schools this year. program, noted that the plan's objec-
"We'll see what the judge says. The tive is "to train teachers for a certain
evaluation component (of the plan) will type of knowledge."
determine (whether it will be used Pietras emphasized that other cour-
elsewhere). Anything I find that's good ses for teachers are offered within the
in one school will generally carry over school system. But, he added, "it's a
to other schools." special case. It's getting a lot more at-
The school board delayed a final vote tention than other projects."
on the plan until next week so there University Prof. Bailey also noted
would be time for community input, ac- that "some things are charged to the
cording to Board President Kathleen budget that shouldn't be."
Reaction to new A A TA
service, fare hike varied
(Continued from Page 7) - .Johnson, however, said "I don't think
will -be any need to lay-off employees it (the new plan) was a response to
under the new service plan which goes what the community wants. It still
into effect Oct. 1, unless they reduce doesn't meet the needs of the people."
(service) hours further." AATA APPROVED the following
PAT DUFORT, director of the Center revisions Wednesday:
for Independent Living, said the center * Fare increase from 35 to 50 cents;
is "very happy" with the.Dial-A-Ride " Half-price discounts for elderly,
service the AATA provides for the han- low-income, and handicapped
dicapped under the new plan. At the passengers;
same time, said DuFort, she is "disap- *.Increased service during peak
pointed" Dial-A-Ride service was cut periods, but no regular evening or Sun-
back for the general population. day service;
"Basically, the board and staff were " Increased Dial-A-Ride for han-
responsive to what the community was dicapped and elderly during the day,
saying during the hearings," she said. Dial-A-Ride service at night for han-
dicapped and other passenEers:

"""'" BILLA "aonLpoo"MUR 1
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SpHOT S DAIL 1:202:409PARAMOU :5PICTURES CORPORAmT ON ALL RiGH7S RESERVED
SHOWS DAILY 12:20-2:40-5:00-7:25:9:55 p

AUDITIONS
"The Devil's Disciple"
Sun. and Mon., August 12 and 13, 7:30 p.m. Call-backs
Wed., Aug. 14. Ann Arbor Civic Theatre, 201 Mulholland, off
W. Washington.
Roles for 5 women plus extras and 10 men plus extras.
Women's ages: 1, 16 yrs., 1, 30 yrs.,;3over 50
Men's ages: 2, 20-30 yrs., 2, 30-40 yrs., 6, 45-60 yrs.

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