100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 14, 1979 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1979-07-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

S. Africans
fined for
'illegal'
employees
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa (AP)
-Stiff new fines for employing
"illegal" black workers went into effect
yesterday in South Africa. Civil rights
advocates warned the measure could
cause unemployment and starvation,
but some officials said effects would be
less harsh.
From now on, whites whose black
employees do not have proper
documents allowing them to be in white
areas of the country will be liable for
fines equivalent toas much as $600 or a
jail sentence of up to three months.
UNDER SOUTH AFRICA'S apar-
theid laws, which enforce racial
segregation, blacks must have pass
books which allow them to legally be in
areas zoned for whites only.
Previously, fines paid by employers
reached a maximum of $120, low
enough so that a number of employers
simply ignored the law.
Now, long-time black em-
ployees-especially domestic servants
in white households-may face
discharge as their employers worry
about the steep penalties in force. Helen
Suzman, a member of the South African
Parilament and an outspoken opponent
of apartheid,. said yesterday that
"people are losing jobs by the hun-
dreds" already.
SOME WHITE officials said the new
fines were not likely to be immediately
enforced, so as to give white employers
a chance to get the documents of their
black employees in order.
Officials who oversee the issuing of
pass books and regular raids to find
illegal blacks seemed taken aback by
criticims of the new measure.
"Don't simply sack people, come to
us first," A.H. Stander, director of the
West Rand administrative board in
Johannesburg, told whites yesterday.
See S. AFRICANS, Page 9
tod

When the heat's on AP Photo
High temperatures are predicted throughout the weekend in the Midwest, and two of Chicago's Brookfield Zoo polar
bears seem to have found the most enjoyable route as they play in their pool to get away from the hot sun.

One m
critically
a police
Arbor po
on Washt
Police

One death, one injury in A2 crash
By TIM YAGLE Street and headed north traveling "at The driver, Wolfe, was dead-on-
an was killed and the other least 70 mph," police said, down to the arrival at University Hospital, while
injured Thursday night after traffic triangle at the Fuller Rd. bridge Hitchcock is in critical condition there.
chase which began with Ann over the railroad tracks. The car then
lice stopping a reckless driver turned the wrong way onto Glen St., a Police said both were absent without
enaw Ave. near S. Forest Ave. one-way street, and crashed into the permission from Ann Arbor's Veteran's
said a car with two male retaining wall. hospital.

passengers, 28-year-old Gary Wolfe of
Dundee, Mich., and Bill Hitchcock, 31,
of Grand Blanc, Mich., was pulled over
by an Ann Arbor police detective in an
unmarked police vehicle for suspicion
of reckless driving and "running other
cars off the road." The pair, who police
said appeared drunk, got out of their
car, relieved themselves in the street,
then got back in their car and left.
POLICE SAID the car then squeaked
its tires making a turn onto Washtenaw
Place. A marked patrol car then ap-
proached to make a routine stop at Glen
and Ann Streets.
The car made a right turn onto Glen

Suspect arraigned on robbery

By TIM YAGLE
Ronnie Preston, who allegedly robbed
the Great Lakes Federal Savings bank
on Plymouth Rd. Wednesday, was
arraigned yesterday in 15th District
Court on charges of armed robbery. He
is charged with unlawfully taking $2,170
from the teller.
The 24-year-old Hamburg, Mich.
native surrendered to Ann Arbor FBI
agents in Detroit Thursday and is being
detained at the Wastenaw County jail.

A preliminary hearing has been
scheduled for July 25.
PRESTON ALLEGEDLY entered the
bank Wednesday brandishing a toy gun
and demanded money from a teller.
Ann Arbor police said he returned to his
car and began driving, when "bait
money," given to him by the teller, ex-
ploded, releasing tear gas and a dye.
Police said Preston then abandoned his
car near Plymouth and Nixon roads.
Police said the maximum penalty
upon conviction is life imprisonment.

1

Drum roll, please ...
... and the winner is-the Phantom Regiment
from Rockford, Ill. The drum and bugle corps won
the top prize at the Drum Corps International's nor-
thern championships. More than 8,000 people wat-
ched 10 bands compete at Eastern Michigan
University's Rynearson Stadium to go to the inter-
national competition in August at Birmingham,
Alabama. The 27th Lancers, who played at North
Campus last summer, placed fourth.
EMU president
The regents of Eastern Michigan University
(EMU) reportedly have selected John Porter, for-
mer head of public instruction for the state, as
EMU'S new president. Porter, who was in
Washington, D.C., declined to comment. The EMU
regents are expected to make a formal announ-
cement early next week.
Booted again
Presidential adviser Hamilton Jordan got the
"boot" for the second time. Jordan's car was em-
blazoned with a "Denver boot," a wheel-locking
contraption used in Washington, Denver, Ann Ar-

bor, and other cities to immobilize vehicles that
have an abundance of unpaid parking tickets on
record. It's the second time since December 1977
the controversial aide to President Carter has been
booted. District of Columbia police report Jordan
owes $110 for parking violations since August 1978.
Don't feel bad if you get the boot-even those with
connections with the president get booted.
Happenings.. .
... Music in the City begins at noon in the cour-
tyard at Kerrytown, with Tom Bergeron on
saxophone and Ted Harley on bass ... the Fourth
Annual Japanese Festival, sponsored by the Inter-
national Center, starts in the Regents Plaza at 6
p.m.and continues until 10 p.m.... Summer
Reperatory '79 presents Childress' "Wedding
Band" at 8 p.m. in the Power Center ... Steward
Scharch will perform on the organ in Hill
Auditorium at 8 p.m.. .. the Gay Advocate's office
is offering a Lesbian/Gay Men's concert-cof-
feehouse on the 'U' Club patio in the Michigan Union
from 9 p.m. until midnight... FILMS: Ann Arbor
Film Co-op-Blue Collar, 7 p.m., 9 p.m., Aud. 3,
MLB . . . Cinema II-baseball night, Alibi Ike, 7
p.m.; film clips, Detroit Tigers' 1968 World Series
win, 8:15 p.m.; Pride of the Yankees, 9:30 p.m., all
in Aud. A, Angell Hall ... Cinema Guild-Taxi
Driver, 7:30 p.m., 9:30 p.m.; Old A&D Aud. SUN-
DAY, Brunch on the Terrace at the Campus Inn

features the Jongleurs at 10 a.m. and noon. Call 769-
2200 for reservations ... Journeys, a collection of
drawings and poetry by K. Manley, opens with a
reception from 3 p.m. until 6 p.m. at Artworlds,
213% S. Main St.... at 4 p.m., Catherine Huntress,
mezzo soprano, will perform at the School of Music
Recital Hall ... Summer Reperatory '79 presents
Coward's "Hay Fever" at 2 p.m. and O'Neill's "Ah,
Wilderness!" at 8 p.m., both in the Power Cen-
ter ... FILMS: Cinema Guild-Metropolis, 8 p.m.,
Old A&D Aud.... MONDAY, the Briarwood
Festival of Fine Arts and Selected Crafts opens at
Briarwood Mall ... Paul Van Der Wiele, city
carillonneur, will perform at Burton Tower from 7
p.m. until 8 p.m.. .,Summer Reperatory Theatre
presents Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing"
at 8 p.m. at the Power Center ... FILMS:- Media
Resources Center-Legend of John Henry and other
children's films, starting at 7:30 p.m., Aud. 3, MLB.
On the outside
Ditto for this hot, humid weather that seems to be
attracted to Ann Arbor, which U.S. District Court
Judge Charles Joiner, who ruled in the Black
English case, called "one of America's most liberal
and forward-looking cities" in his decision. It will be
muggy again, and the temperatures will continue to
hang around 90'. And expect more scattered thun-
dershowers in the afternoon and evening.

i
i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan