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January 15, 1976 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-01-15

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01 Thursday, January 15, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Thursday, January 15, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Dental
prof
dies
Dr. Walter Swartz, a profes-
sor of dentistry at the Univer-
sity, died late Tuesday night of
a heart attack apparently in-
duced by his having to walk
home through the deep snow-
drifts of Tuesday's storm, be-
cause his car was stuck in a
parking lot.
The 53-year-old professor. also
a local practicing dentist, was
the only dental faculty member
ever to be three times given
the school's Paul Gibbons
Award, chosen by senior dental
students on , the basis of out-
standing teaching quality.
"ALL OF US are kind of
shocked and distressed at his'
premature loss," said Dr. Rob-
ert Doeer, associate dean of
the Dentistry School.
"He was one of the most
dearly lived members of the
faculty, and an outstanding per-
son whose character influenced
everyone in the department. The
students loved him too," Doeer
added.
Swartz, with the School of
Dentistry since 1948 after earn-
ing his degree there, was na-
tionally known for his dental
research.
Memorial services will be held
at the First United Methodist
Church at 1 p.m. tomorrow.

Ford nominates woman as
ambassador to Great Britain

_ _

AP Photo
Bicentennial haircut
Tommy Tomaszowski, an ex-Navy man who lives in San
Diego, is really going all the way to show his patriotic
bicentennial spirit. Here Tomaszowski, who says he hopes
to set an example to other Americans, sports his new "76"
haircut. In Michigan people might be advised to wait until
spring before exposing their scalps like this.

WASHINGTON (P) - Presi-
dent Ford yesterday nominated
former White House counselor
Anne Armstrong of Texas to be
the first woman to serve as U.S.
ambassador to Great Britain
and said he expected her to
do "a superb job."
Secretary of State Henry Kis-
singer and Ms. Ford stood along-
side as the President named
Armstrong to her new job and
promised to continue to name
women to government posts.
THE BRITISH Foreign Office
gave its approval Tuesday to
Armstrong's appointment, fin-
ishing in one week diplomatic
formalities that normally take
four to six weeks.
If confirmed, Armstrong, 48,
succeeds Ambassador Elliot
Richardson, who is coming home
to be Ford's new commerce
secretary.
Armstrong has only one year
of government experience and
has visited England only once,
when she was a student at Vas-
sar College.
NEVERTHELESS, she told re-
porters who called on her re-
cently at the 50,000-acre Arm-
strong Ranch 75 miles from the
Mexican border that she thinks
she is equal to the task of
representing U.S. interests as
the first woman to hold the top
ambassadorial post in London.
"I've always been interested
in foreign policy," said Mrs.
Armstrong, 48, who was an ad-
viser on domestic affairs to for-
mer President Richard Nixon
in 1973-1974.
Armstrong, a strikingly at-
tractive woman with short black
hair and a deep, strong voice,
said she missed the public are-
na while in Texas. "I missed
a lot of the people and the
stimulating atmosphere, being
in on the decisions and hav-
ing an input in the big issues
I think Britain is one post
where you can have input."
SHE SAID she would discuss
her foreign policy views during
her Senate confirmation hear-
ings;
She added that she was not
up on such matters as the Com-
mon Market and North Sea oil
exploration - topics of great
concern in Britain - and that
she would have to learn about
them.
"I'm smart enough and ener-

getic enough," she said. "I can'
do it. I don't know if I can be
humble and confident at the
same time, but I think I can."
ASKED IN Washington for her
feelings on the controversial
Concorde faster-than-sound jet-
liner, a joint Franco-British pro-
ject, Mrs. Armstrong laughed:
"I know I'd be in trouble with
the Senate if I spoke out now,
on that."
She said Ford's telephone call
to ask if she were interested
in the job "came out of the
blue" but at another point she
answered that "I think my be-
ing a woman had something to
do with it."
And she plans to show a wom-
an can do the job. "It annoys
me that men aren't subject to
the same sort of disbelief when
a man takes a government job
in a field he doesn't know much
about" she said.
"THEY FEEL he will learn
about it. I think all smart, en-
ergetic determined people can
learn things. But I don't think
a male is subject to the same
UNFAIR PRACTICES
UPIALES, Colombia (UPI) -
Motorists from Ecuador, an oil
exporter and a member of the
OPEC cartel, are forming long
lines at gasoline stations in this
border town of Colombia, which
is barely self-sufficient in its
petroleum needs.
Regular gasoline has recently
risen in price in Colombia from
11 to 13.5 cents a gallon, but
that's still three times as cheap
as in Ecuador.
Ipiales merchants are grum-
bling that the Ecuadorean mo-
torists clog the town, park their
cars on the sidewalks, and why
should the Colombian govern-
ment subsidize fuel only to have
the Ecuadoreans, who have oil
to spare, cart it away in their
tanks?
1, -'_ _

sort of criticism."
Armstrong is a supporter of
the Equal Rights Amendment
and was a member of the U.S.
delegation to the International
Women's Year conference in
Mexico City.
Asked if she would have been
considered for the job if her
family were not wealthy, she
said, "I don't want to mislead
people into thinking we're going
to entertain in the same way
as some of they very rich am-
bassadors we've had."

classroom instruction in
electronic music
the music

DAILY OFFIIAL BULLETIN
J: ..N::.... ::::.:.:J:::L ..:.n:"..L ... .. ".:.....:i .....:J::.:::"":..: .: ..::t .. J... ............................ .. ...

Thursday, January 15
Day Calendar.
WUOM: Two women attorneys:
Rosemary,. Pooler, exec. dir., N.Y.
State Board ofConsumer Protec-
tion, "Making it in the Legal Pro-
fession;" & Carole Bellows,, presi-
dent-elect, Illinois State Bar Assoc.,
"New Attitudes and . Political
Trends," 10:05 am.
AAUP Meeting: Panel, "Can Our
Grievance Procedures Be Improv-
ed?" U Club, noon (phone reser-
vations by noon, Jan. 13).
Ctr. Japanese Studies: "Teach-
ing Japanese Language at U-M: A
Departure from the Old Ways?"
Commons Rm., Lane Hall, noon.
Public Health Films: VD-Name
Your Contacts; Venereal Disease:
The Hidden Epidemie, Aud. SPH II,
12:10 pm.
Behavorial Science Series: Gene-
tics and Behavior Films, Lee. Em.
1, MLB, 3:30 pm.

Atmospheric, Oceanic Seminar: J.
R. Boyle, 'tThe Soil System In the
Nitrogen Cycle," 114 Aerospace, 4
pm.
Regents' Meeting: Regents' Rm.,
1:30 pm; public comments, 2:30
pm; public discussion at Dearborn,
Fair Lane Conf. Ctr., 4 pm.
Theoretical Seminar: R. Cahn, U.
of washington, "Deviations from
Coulomb's Law: How Muonic
Atoms Test QEb," 2038 Randall
Lab, 4 pm.
Int'l Night: Indian food, League
Cafeteria, 5-7:15 pm.
U Club: Basketball Smorgasbord,.
John Orr, spkr, Club Terrace, 6
pm.
Men's Swimming: U-M vs. South-
ern Illinois, Matt Mann Pool, 7:30
pm.
Music School: Degree recital -
Cathy Hilbish, mezzosoprano, Re-1
cital Hall, 8 pm.
Career Planning & Placement

3200 SAB, 764-7456
If you want a job or plan to at-
tend grad/professional school make
an appt with reps on-campus; in-
terviewing at CP&P: Jan. 20; Or-
bach's Inc., Jan. 21; Prudential
Life, Jan. 22; S. Methodist U./Law,
Cargill, & U. of Toledo/Law.
Summer Placement
3200 SAB 763-4117
Interviews: Camp Tamarack, Mi
Coed: interview Tues, 20 & Fri. 23
9-5; openings include counselors,
supervisors, drivers, cooks,unurses,
specialists; register in person or by
phone 763-4117.
Camp Chi, WI Coed: interview
Mon. Jan. 26 9-5; openings include
counselors, specialists, tennis, wat-
erfront, arts, crafts, supvrs, many
others; Phone 763-4117.

WE'RE THE
OLDEST
CAR RENTAL
IN ANN ARBOR
With the
NEWEST
MODELS

Chevette
Nova
Veqa
Pinto
Dotson 240Z
Mark IV'

Malibu
Monte Carlo
LTD
Elite
Torino
Lino

i
L

D

Soft
for participating in
Market Research Study
For details, send
name and address to:
Medical Research Associates
P.O. Box 342
Laguna Beach, CA 92652

i

kkk

TICKETS NOW ON SALE.
h $4.00
at
Hill Auditorium
Box Office
The Blind Pig
and both Discount
Record stores
Les McCann
AND
MIXED BAG
Wed., Jan. 21st
Michigan Union Ballroom
First Show 8:00, Second Show 10:30
0 Doors open at 7:30

ECONO-CAR
438 W. HURON
663-2033

I

11
JOHN
C HAWKES
WILL BE AT CENTICORE
MONDAY, JAN. 19, 1-3 P.M..
AUT TGRA H q i
I&lb,7 0 oI

A phone call. A simple,
ten-cent phone call for a cab could
save your friend's life.
If your friend has been
drinking too much, he shouldn't
be driving.
The aiit mnhilsh crah is the.

that the drunk drivers responsible
for killing young people are most
often other young people.
Take a minute. Spend a
dime:Call a cab. That's all. If you
can't do that, drive him yourself.
Or let him sleep on vour couuch.

DRUNK DRIVER, DEPT. Y*
I BOX 2345
j ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
I want to save a friend's life.
Tell me what else I can do.
' My1 name s-- - -

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