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April 06, 1976 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-04-06

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Tuesday April 6, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Tuesday, April 6, 1976 THE MIChiGAN DAILY Page Three

Republicans control C(

(Continued from Page 1)
ly 1,600 votes, while the proposalI
to levy an additional one mill in
property taxes, to upgrade city
roads was rejected by nearly
3,000 votes. Absentee ballots
have yet to be counted to these
races.
But the shocker of the eve-
ning was the startling victory of
Allen, who ran what he called a
"'people's type campaign" in the
First Ward. "We talked about
students, elderly people, and the
working folks," Allen said at
last night's jubilant GOP cele-
bration at a local Holiday Inn.
LOCAL DEMOCRATS had
bitter words about Allen's win,
both for the winner himself and
the dismal Democratic effort in
the First Ward.
Rowry, a 46-year-old black
bus driver, told reporters at the
Rubaiyat bar that, "We didn't
have the organization and the
push. Last year we were run-

ning our asses off." Last year,
First Ward Democrats elected
Liz Keough to Council. As for
Allen himself, Rowry would say
only, "The first chance I get,
I'm going to throw up on him."
A booze - emboldened Carol
Jones, Democratic Councilwo-
man from the Second Ward was
even more pointed in her dis-
dain for Allen. Said Jones, "If
he has any brains, he has yet
to show them. No, let me
amend that. I'm sure he has
brains, but not brains of his
own."
IT WAS apparently the poor
student and Democratic turn-
out in the First Ward, which
contains both West and South
Quads in addition to a large
number of student apartments,
that was at least partially re-
sponsible for Allen's upset win.
A look at the ward's 1975
Council race shows that Demo-

crat Liz Keough earned nearly
900 more votes than Rowry,
about 2,400, while the Republi-
can's appeal has remained fair-
ly stable. Last year, Karen Graf
garnered approximately 1,500
votes, while last night Allen got
only a shade less than 1,700 tal-
lies. This year's SHRP candi-I
date, Diane Autin, however, re-j
ceived only 308 votes, compar-
ed to David Goodman's 1,450
last year. In short, the people
who might have tipped the
scales to Rowry stayed home.
"It's the Democrats sitting at
home and not voting," said First
Ward victor Earl Greene. "For
this reason they end up with an
ass like Wendell Allen."
KENWORTHY, WHO got a
welcome assist in the Fourth
Ward with some Republican
cross-over votes, said "it's de-
pressingdthat they (the stu-
dents) don't think they have a
stake in this city. My student
margin was way down. The stu-
dents supported me in terms of
percentages but not in terms of
numbers."I
Republican Councilman Roger
Bertoia called last night's re-
sults, "a campaign against May-
or Wheeler even though he
wasn't running. It was a cam-
paign against his politics and
his policies. I think the city has
spoken and they have had
enough of Wheeler," Bertoia con-
tinued. "Now he is going to
have to revise his thinking ac-
cording to what the voters have
indicated."
FORMER GOP Mayor James
Stephenson was somewhat less
combative than Bertoia, not go-
ing as far as to guarantee a
Republican mayoral win next
year.

)uncil
"The city is pretty closely
divided between the Democrats*
and the Republicans," said Ste-
phenson. "Control last year was
decided by 121 votes and tonight
by the same number. I think a
good Democratic candidate run-
ning a campaign on the issues
at the time that were important
would have a good chance ofj
winning."
Stephenson was mildly sur-
prised at the voters rejection
of PV, and said he did not feel
"like a sacrificial lamb" be-
cause the system caused his, at
leasttemporary, political ruin.
While the PV controversy may
have been rendered academic(
for the time being due to the
eclipse of SHRP in this city,
Ypsilanti's two incumbent HRP
councilmen retained their seats
on the council last night. Eric
Jackson and Harold Baize both _
won their races with about 50
per cent of the vote. The over-
all turnout in Ypsilanti was light,
but a larger than expected stu-
dent vote put them over the top.
BUT AS for SHRP in Ann Ar-
bor, the prognosis at present is
not favorable. Diana Kohn, how-
ever, is not ready to -give it up
entirely. "A lot of liberals and
radicals are staying home now,
and I can see why. People are
getting disgusted with the kind
of politics that are coming
down." Asked what the party
planned to do, she replied, "Wait
around until people get sick ofj
the Democrats again, I guess."
This election story was com-
piled by Bill Turque, with files
from Susan Ades, Anne Marie
Lipinski, Rick Soble, Mike Yel-
in, Mike Norton, Lois Josim-
ovch and George Lobsenz.

WHY WALK FURTHER
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Available at
Wild's Varsity Shopf

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311 S. STATE STREET

-i

The Oyster Bar&
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OPEN FOR LUNCH
Wednesday, Thursday, & Friday
12:00 noon-i :30 p.m.
SALAD BAR $2.50
served with bread and butter
SPAGHETTI with MEAT or MUSHROOMS
or WHITE CLAM SAUCE...........$1.95
served with bread and butter and smallsalad bowl
OPEN FACE PROSCUITTO HAM and
JALSBERG CHEESE SANDWICH ...... $1.95

A o- - - -f-v

AYote to build an effective
student government
Vote YES
MSA Funding
ELECTION TODAY-Thursday
Michigan Student Assembly

CROCK OF SOUP DU JOUR
AND SALAD BOWL (small)
bread sticks

$1.95

SHRP fails in bid
for Council seats

~flff7~moLd

(Continued from Page 1)
Council, the party's effective-
ness in city politics has been
rapidly waning. The Socialists
were unable to capitalize on
their 1972 victories in the First
and Second Wards, and failed
to land a Council seat the fol-
lowing year.
In 1974, with the two SHRP
Council members' terms up, it
was crucial for the party to
prove itself alive and fighting.
But the party demonstrated that
it was only strong enough to
kick. The SHRP candidate in
the Second Ward, Kathy Koza-
chenko, was the only party mem-
ber to capture a Council seat.
KOZACHENKO'S s 1 i m, 40-
vote victory in 1974 guaranteed
the SHRP only another two
years on Council. Last year no
SHRP candidate captured a seat
in City Hall and yesterday's re-
peat of 1975 finally brought the
party's contract to its end.
During their four years in city
politics, the SHRP was a leader
in allowing the voters to de-
cide on controversial referenda.
However, the party's ability to
put a proposal on the ballot was
not duplicated in an ability to
pass the crucial voters' test.
Time and again, SHRP-spon-
sored ballot proposals were
given a "No" vote by local
residents.
OUT OF TWO rent control
ballot proposals, a door-to-door
voter registration referendum, a
day care ballot issue, preferen-
tial voting for mayor (PV) and
a proposed $5 marijuana fine,
only the dope law and PV were
passed. Now, only the lenient
marijuana law survives since
PV was successfully repealed
yesterday.
In late 1971, the SHRP was
formed out of an alliance of
student radicals left over from
the activism of the late sixties,
disenchanted Democrats and the
Rainbow People's Party (RPP)
-formerly the White Panthers.
The new socialist party sweat-
ed to wring every ounce of worth
from two recent voting laws: the
26th Amendment granting the
18-year-old vote, and a 1971 State
Supreme Court decision allow-
ing students to register in their
college towns.
THOUSANDS of 18 year-olds
across the country were swept
up with democratic enthusiasm
generated by the campaign to

pass the 26th Amendment, and
the University was no exception.
"Throw the rascals out" was the
feeling among many first time
voters and became a motto used
by the local socialist party.
"18-Use the Power!" slogans
were put up city wide by the
SHRP.
In an election that was a
surprise to many city residents
and. a shock to local Democrats,
the SHRP proved in 1971 that
they were capable of garnering
m a n y liberal-radical v o t e s.
SHRP candidate G e r r y De-
Grieck won in the First Ward
and fellow C o u n c i l hopeful
Nancy Wechsler captured the
Second Ward seat.
DE GRIECK, with Wechsler'sj
invaluable support, was an ef-
fective voice on Council. Just
weeks after being elected, De-
Grieck and Wechsler were re-
sponsible for getting the coun-
try's first $5 marijuana ordi-
nance approved.
That ordinance was taken off;
the books 15 months later by a;
Republican majority on Council
and later reinstated by city
voters.
But the hysteria generated by
the SHRP in 1972 was never to
be repeated.I
Within a year, the party be-
came hopelessly factionalized
between the radicals and more
moderates. The split centered
around those wanting to be prag-
matic, and those refusing to
c o m p r o m i s e their socialist
ideals.
T h e SHRP Councilpersonsi
were branded with a spoiler
image" because they tried to
play both parties against each
other.
FOLLOWING this, then-GOP
Mayor J i m Stephenson was
elected in 1973 with only 48 per
cent of the vote. Charges of
"vote splitting" were leveled at
the SHRP by Democrats who
realized t h a t liberal - radical
votes had been divided between
the two parties. The result was
a minority mayor and a Repub-
lican majority on Council.
That year, many of the radi-
cal old guard left town to re-
direct their efforts and SHRP
was left without effective lead-
ership and candidates.
The party struggled for an-
other three years, putting can-
didates on the ballot, but never
with the spirit which won their
success four years ago.

SUNOAW, MoN'AYV, '
cove t !! <<ri y -- .
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CHILDREN MILLER W
COVER COVER ?V 1.
CATFISH A(GINGRT
COVER COVE ' ~ oo
COVER Wp aw7u9 AV# Z
SMAL L T c N'n
COVERZo;o 6
' .EVERY FRIDAY AFTERNOO-:30 - 7:30
i EIN LYNCHI &HIS WESTERN SWING FRIENDS.

VEAL FRANCAISE ................ $2.95
veal tenderloin saute in butter with parsley, garlic and
lemon, served with spaghetti and tomato sauce, small
salad bowl and bread and butter
SHRIMP MARIA..................$3.25
cooked in butter with mushrooms, scallions, sherry,
sauce, served with small salad bowl, spaghetti with
tomato sauce, bread and butter
SCALLOPS MARIA ................ $3.25
cooked same as shrimp with same service
POACHED FISH IN
CHAMPAGNE SAUCE ..............$2.95
please ask your waitress for daily fish-served with
small salad bowl, bread and butter and spaghetti with
tomato sauce
OMETLETTE MAISON .............. $2.95
a three egg omelette with mushrooms, Jalsberg cheese,
tomatoes leek, onions, wine, served wth bread and
butter
LOW CALORIE VEGETABLE PLATE ... $2.95
assortment of FRESH vegetables saute in a drop of
olive oil, chablis and light spices, topped with Jalsberg
cheese, served with bread sticks and small salad bowl
COQ AU VIN .....................$2.95
boneless chicken cooked in a delicious wine sauce,
served with small salad bowl, bread and butter and
spaghetti with tomato sauce
SOUP with any luncheon above .......$1.00
CREPE NICOISE..................$2.95
paper thin crepe filled with assortment of seafood and
vegetables, served with small salad bowl and fruit
garnish

WANTED-COLLEGE STUDENTS
Come to IDAHO for an unforgettable pack trip by HORSE-
BACK thru the Idaho Wilderness Area Enjoy the moiestic
beauty, clean air, and pure water of the ruged Rocky
Mountains, unspoiled by civilization, roads or motorized
vehicles. We are offering special environmental 5-day pack
trips every Monday starting May 31 thru August for
$195.00 per person plus 3%f sales tax. We supply horses,
meals, tents, puides-evervthina except your sleeping bacg
and personal aear. Come alone or form your own group.
Reservations should be made NOW. Call or write:
PECK'S PONDEROSA
P.O. Box 57 Challis, ID 83226 (208) 879-2303
The Christian Science Organization at the
University of Michigan would kie to invite you
to a free talk on Christian Science.
"GET YOUR LIFE IN BALAN(E"
by DAVID C. DRIVER, C.S.B.
TUESDAY, April 6, at 7:30 p.m.
in the FACULTY CLUB LOUNGE
MICHIGAN UNION, 1st Floor
THERE WILL BE A TIME FOR QUESTIONS!

301 W. HURON

663-2403

" I IN a DOMINO

THE UN-FANCY STORES
WITH UN-FANCY PRICES

children 's
" j rs.
. Clolhesville's
323 E. W illiam
* 761-3686"
ALWAYS 20-70% OFF RETAIL
other stores in.
' NORTHVI LLE,
TROY-ROCH ESTER,
KALAMAZOO .
4

If you had -anything to do with
the following organizations:
African Students Association Jamaican Student Organization
Alpha Phi Omega Student Blood Madison Street Entertainment Committee
Bank Drive Martin Sostre Defense Committee
Ann Arbor Fifth Estate Mortar Board
Ann Arbor People's Bicentennial Michigan Fair Tax Campaign
Committee National Student Conference on Racism
Ann Arbor Tenants Union Native American Events
Black Christian Nationalist Conference Rackham Student Government
Child Care Action Center Radical Student Union
Chicano Program Development Center Raza Art and Media Collective
Community Values Lecture Series Red Cross-Honduras Disaster Relief
East Wind Regents Candidates Night
Food Action Coalition Sailing Club
Frame-up Film Festival Seymour Hersch Lecture-Pilot Program
Fraternity Coordinating Council Spartacus Youth League
Future Worlds Lecture Series Spiritual Community of the Sun
Gay Academics Union Student Dietetic Association
Gerontology Association Student Organizations Information Center
Graduate Employees Organization (Mich. Union)
Graduate Student NewsletterU of M Polish Club
United Farm Workers Support Committee
Group on Latin American Issues University Housing Council
Indochina Peace Campaign Voter Registration City Charter
Inmate Project Amendment Campaign
YOU WERE BEING FUNDED BY THE
STUDENT GOVERNMENT.
Vote YES

:U.

F 'U

UNIVERSITY
HOUSING COUNCIL
... endorses the dorm fast
on April 9 in support of the
United Farmworkers.

i

H

UHC encourages all dorm residents to
sign the petitions circulating in the
dorms in support of this cause.

e reklehakoe I rs
rO

LECTURES SPONSORED BY
CENTER FOR NEAR EASTERN AND
NORTH AFRICAN STUDIES
APRIL 6-3:00-4:30-3540 FRIEZE
W. Montgomery Watt
Professor of Arabic and
Islamic Studies, Univ. of Edinburgh
"Muslim-Christian Dialogue 1976"
APRIL 7-4:00-200 LANE HALL
Philip H. Stoddard
Deputy Director, Office of Research
and Analysis for Near East
and South Asia, U S. State Dept.
"U.S. Middle Eastern Foreign Policy"
. e n i na k I A M C L A I

I

for

Funding

proposal

I

11

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