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January 14, 1976 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-01-14

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Wednesday, January 14, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three
--A-

Wednesday, January 14, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Syria, PLO clash
on resolutions

U

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UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (M)4
- A Syrian diplomat said yes-
terday that Syria seeks the im-
plementation of all U.N. Mideast
resolutions, revealing possible
I differences with the Palestine
Liberation Organization (PLO).
The PLO made clear, in an
appearance Monday before the
Security Council, that it rejects
the 1967 and 1973 council reso-
lutions that form the corner-
stone for all Mideast peace ne-
gotiations. The resolutions do
not refer to Palestinian home-
land demands.
"We advocate the complete
implementation of all U.N. reso-
lutions without exception," Sy-
rian Ambassador Mouaffak Al-
paf told a reporter before the
council was to meet to continue
its Mideast debate.
Aplaf had been asked if Sy-
ria excluded the resolutions re-
jected by the PLO from those
it wanted carried out.
Syria, Egypt and Jordan were
scheduled to speak in the Tues-
day council session. Fellow Arab
countries named all three coun-
tries to a committee to draft
a resolution after Monday's
opening session of the debate.
Also named to the committee
were Libya and the PLO.
In Israel, soldiers shot and
killed four Arab guerrillas that
the Tel Aviv command said had
infiltrated on a terror mission
timed to coincide with the de-
bate. The command said leaf-
lets on the bodies identified
I them as members of the Arab

Rejection Front, which opposes
the PLO.
In New York. police found and
disarmed a bomb early yester-
day in front of the mission of
Iraq, about three miles from
U.N. headquarters. Three pipe
bombs were found Monday be-
neath the U.N. library building
timed to go off just before the
council debate began. Anony-
mous telephone callers said all
of the bombs had been planted
by the "Jewish Armed Resist-
ance Strike Unit in association
with the Jewish Defense
League."
Farouk Kaddoumi, head of the
PLO's political department, told
the council Monday that the
PLO was against Resolutions
242 and 338 of 1967 and 1973
and also the General Assembly's
1947 resolution favoring parti-
tion of Palestine into Arab and
Jewish states.
The Syrian ambassador said be-
fore yesterday's meeting:
"What we want is just the im-
plementation of U.N. resolutions,
that the Security Council fulfill
its responsibilities under 'the
charter with some action in or-
der to implement and to con-
firm the basic principles for a
peacgeful and just settlement."
He said that each resolution
concerned "a specific part of
the problem" - listing rights of
the Palestinians to return to
homes where Israel is now, Is-
raeli occupation of Arab terri-
tories and partition.

Ir

14

"STUDY ABROAD 1976"

AP Photo
Say cheese
Tige, a four-month old Bengal tiger, gives the camera the eye while posing with Hugh Oaks,
manager of the Vancouver Game Farm in Al dergrove, B.C. One of four in a litter, Tige
now weighs 70 pounds and is expected to level off'at 500 when fully grown.
TIROUBLE FOR CARLOS:
Unionism growing in

MADRID, Spain (P)-- Emerg- seek amnesty for political pri-
ing from nearly four decades of soners, many of them trade
rigid government control, Span- unionists, and political and un-
ish unions are struggling to ion liberty. Even though eco-
master a labor weapon the nomic strikes are now legal,
Western industrialized w o r 1 d the creation of strike funds and
takes for granted-the strike. picketing remain illegal.
Their labor pains could put An estimated 200,000 work-!
the- new government of King ers were idle across Spain yes-
Juan Carlos in serious trouble. terday at the start of a sec-
But they could also point it to- ond week of labor unrest. Those
ward the path for the special off work - in support of de-
Spanish - style democracy the mands for raises of from $86I
new regime says it wants. to $172 a month -- included
WHATEVER the result, un- many industrial workers, and,
ionism is coming into its own telephone, postal and electric
for the first time since the late employes.
Gen. Francisco Franco ruled IN SOME cases, police have
out strikes after winning the responded to labor and student
Spanish civil war. demonstrations with clubs and
Many strikes are for more tear gas. The new government
pay and better working condi- says it will try to keep hands
tions. But leftist leaders also off labor conflicts based on eco-

nomic motives but will step ini
when necessary to maintain lawI
and order.
"The question," says a high
government official, "is not how
far to open the door, but if we
can control it as we do? We
think we can."
Not everybody agrees.
BUSINESS worries that days
of labor conflict lie ahead at a
time when the economy is the
most shaky it has been in the
past 20 years. Law and order
have been disturbed by union
demonstrations, another Franco
taboo, and police reaction to
them. Right - wing politicians
privately criticize Premier Car-
los Arias Navarro, a political
conservative, and his govern-
ment. Some union leaders are
puzzled by what to do next.

Spain.
Their followers and the public
seem even more so.
Most newspapers saw the
capital's survival of a five-day
subway strike as a sign of the
nation's maturity. The Franco
regime had contended that a
Madrid subway strike would
mean automatic chaos.
But the outbreak of labor un-
rest spreading across the coun-
try and the police replies with
clubs and tear gas in the streets
has been an uncomfortable re-
minder to some of the disorder.
that shook the Republican gov-
ernment ahead of the civil war.
THE GOVERNMENT charges
that the labor conflicts are
Communist - inspired:and org-
anized to bring it down. But the
Communists party's range of
influence is still unmeasured."
Such a charge seems to ac-
knowledge the left's powerful
influence among the unions des-I
pite years of control of the gov-
ernment union apparaturs from
the top.
No one openly refers to Por-
tugal, where the Communist
party emerged after the April
revolution in control of Lisbon's
unions. But Madrid officials say
privately they need a moder-
ate left in Spain, perhaps So-
cialists, as a buffer against
such a Communist union take-
over.

TON IGHT
CFS Coffee Hour
DATE: Jan. 14th-TONIGHT
TIME: 7:30" p.m.
PLACE: Michigan Union (Main Floor)
ROOM: Anderson A (near showcases)
--20 MINUTE FILM ON FRANCE-
'76 CATALOGS & APPLICATIONS NOW AVAILABLE
FOR SUMMER OR ACADEMIC YEAR ABROAD!
ALL INVITED:
STUDENTS--Who wish to study abroad.
TF's & FACULTY-Who wish to study aboard
or who wish to be group leaders for a Free Trip.
USSR ® GENEVA 0 VIENNA "PARIS 0 DIJON, NAIROBI @ FLORENCE
" PERUGIA@ NICE 0 ISRAEL COPENHAGEN
BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS " SPAIN

"1 did-it-myself
at Megatrames,
because the hours were con-
venient. Theyre open Monday
thru Friday, 10 AM to 9 PM.
Saturdays until 5:30 and Sunday
from noon to 6:00"
Come in and let U :v%
how simple and re.-. ar
be to frame-i-yourself ad
money.too.
M kS
205N.MAtNSTREET ANNARBOR.MICH.
PHONE 769-9420

CENTER F07R

P

'14 STUDY-.-662-5575

New, compact computer
reads' print to the blind

CAMBRIDGE, Mass (M) -
A desktop machine that can
"read" printed material aloud
to blind people was demonstra-
ted here yesterday by the small
computer firm that developed
it.
The machine speaks English
in a halting, sing-song voice
with what sounds like a mild
Swedish accent.1
THE COMPACT computeriz-
ed device can read books, mag-
azines or almost any printed
material in virtually any type-
face, its developers said.
Raymond Kurzweil, 27, its in-
ventor and president of Kurz-
Weil Computer Products, Inc.,.
said the device will be avail-
able to libraries and institu-
'tions in about 18 months. Blind
people will be able to buv them
for their homes in about four
years.
The mnrhine will cost about
$25,000 when it first goes on
the market. bt within five
veers the nr-e shorld he down
to abont V5.000 or $10.000, Kurz-'
Weil chid.
JAMES GASHEL, chief of th

Washington office of the .Na-
tional Federation of the Blind,
demonstrated the machine at
its first public showing Tuesday.
"I think we are going to have
a truly effective reading ma-
chine for the blind," he said.
"It isn't going to solve all of
the problems of the blind. But
it is a step forward so that the
blind can compete with more
equality."
To operate it, the blind per-
son places an open book or oth-
er printed page on a glass-top-
ped scanning device. Then the
machine studies the material
line by line, reading aloud at
about 200 words a minute.
THE MACHINE, a two-foot
cube about the size of a desk-
ton photocopier, speaks in a
deliberate, expressionless voice.
Tt is nrogrammed to give some
stress and parses, thoneh, to
make sentences intelligible.
At the demonstration, the ma-
chine read aloud a printed
ronv of Ahrinri Lincoln's Get-
tvb1rg Address. It also re-
n, ted a descrinption of itself,
tvred by a renorter, that be-

gan: "Hello. I am a compu-
ter . .
With a keyboard lettered in
Braille dots, the blind can slow
the machine down or make it
stop and spell out difficult
words.
The machine took five years
to develop, Kurzweil said. Some
of the work was done under
contract for the U. S. Depart-
ment of Health, Education and
Welfare.

The Tower of London is a
group of buildings and towers
covering 13 acres along the
north bank of the Thames.
Charles Martel, at the battle
of Tours (A.D. 732) defeated
the Moslems, checking their ad-
vance in western Europe. I

ACU-1
Duplicate Bridge
Tournament
Thursday, 7 p.m.
Assembly Hall
Michigan Union

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Michigan Undergraduate
EconomicsAssociation
ANNOUNCES ITS
first meeting of Winter '76

rr";..~':~s}'~r''3>+::r::7~ aL Y""i ~ :5.F: "i-:*Cx t"}".:IJ;r::?nqt i'i:
DARNT VFFICIAL RTTTJLTTN

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Wednesday, January 14
Day Calendar
WUOM: "Guernica," a program
about war, with dramatic excerpts,
reading by Sandburg, newscast by
E. R. Murrow. & music, 10 am.
CREES: Henrk Skolimowski,
"How Are the Communist Countries_
Coping with the Plague of Afflu-
ence." Int'l Ctr~- noon.
Public Health Films: VD-Name
Your Contacts; veneral Disease the
Hidden Epidemic, Aud. SPH II,
12:10 pm.
CRLT Colloquia Series: Karl L.
Zinn, Terrance Tice, "values and
the College Curriculum," 2549 LSA,
3:15-5 pm.
Res. College Lectures: David Jack-
son, "Recombinant DNA Methodol-
ogy: Principles, Applications, and

Societal Implications," Greene
Lounge, E. Quad, 7 pm.
Music School: Piano dept. recital,
Recital Hall, 8 pm.
Career Planning & Placement
3200 SAB; Phone 7647456
If you want a job or plan to at-
tend grad / professional school
make an appointment with Reps on
campus. Interviewing at CP&P :
Jan. 20, Orbach's Inc.; Jan. 21,
Prudential Life; Jan. 22, So. Metho-
dist U./Law, Cargill, & U. of Toledo/
Law.
Summer Placement
3200 SAB, 763-4117
INTERVIEwS: Camp Tamarack,
Mich. Coed: Interview Tues., 20 and
Fri., 23 9-5; openings include coun-
selors, supervisors, drivers, cooks,
nurses, specialists; register In per-
son or by phone 763-4117.

102E
Wedn
NEW MEM

At 7:30 p.m.

Economics Building
iesday, January 14
OBERS ARE VERY WELCOME

mmwmm

FRI.-SAT.: 8:30-$2.50
Thne National
Recovery Act
witi

hY.~

rniriK

DAVE PRINE and
TYLER WILSON

WI

A phone call. A simple,
ten-cent phone call for a cab could
save your friend's life.
If your friend has been
drinking too much, he shouldn't
be driving.

that the drunk drivels responsible
for killing young people are most
often other young people.
Take a minute. Spend a
dime. Call a cab.-That's all. If you
can't do that. drive him vourself.

}r- .. """"""""" ""m"""' am "" "- 0
DRUNK DRIVER, DEPT. Y* I
I BOX 23451
I ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
I want to save a friend's life.

I

I

I

Tell me what else I can do

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