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March 30, 1976 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-03-30

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AteTHE MICHIGAN DAILY
Tuesday, March 30, 1976 age Five

Folk group- last of the old

time black

s tring bands

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Join Arts Page staff
IF YOU HAVE a particular interest in local cultural events or
a flair for writing about the arts, The Michigan Daily cor-
dially invites you to join our Arts and Entertainment Page staff.
We have a need for aspiring journalists who would like to
tackle record, movie and concert reviews. For further informa-
tion please attend a special meeting for new staffers tonight at
7:00 in the Daily offices on the second floor of the Student
Publications Bldg. at 420 Maynard St., or call 764-0552 this
afternoon and ask for Jeff Sorensen.

the arborS"*" S
TONIGHT: TUES., MAR. 30
MIDWEST PREMIERE OF
THE GENTLEMAN TRAMP
(1975)
The .Lifeand Times of Charlie Chaplin. Orig-
inal music by Chaplin. An affectionate tribute
to Charlie using scenes from 17 of his greatest
films, newsreels, still photos, and Dond Chap-
lin's home movies. Narrated by W. Matthau
and Sir Laurence Olivier. The definitive film
biography of the life and work of this great
film artist.
FIRST TIME EVER IN ANN ARBOR!
Produced by Bert Schneider, dir. Richard Patterson
at 7, 8:45, and 10:30
in AUD. A, ANGELL HALL
$1 25, KIDS 75c

By JOAN BORUS ragtime, blues, early jazz, popu- jacket, but surprisingly without Howard's sons was making a
lar songs and even a little bit of one of his outrageous hats which videotape of the group's per-
"LADIES AND gentlemen, we classical music. have become his , trademark, formance. "They're not spring
are Martin, Bogen and and Ted in a brightly patternedp
Armstrong, the last of the old HEAR THEM do just one shirt and an even brighter red chickens anymore," he said, ex-
time black string bands-thank number and you'll know why jacket, which the other mem- plaining that the tape was to be
goodness." No matter where they have continued to endure bers kidded him about all even- used to permanently record
they go (and they've' been in;despite a host of obstacles. ing, memories for their grandchild-
nearly every state, not to men- IYears of playing in all kinds of Such a colorful appearance ren. His point is well taken;
tion Latin and Central America), situations (bars, parties, fish holds the promise of a dazzling Martin, Bogen and the Arm-
Howard Armstrong, the group's fries and radio broadcasts, to performance, and the group strongs are a unique group, the
violinist, always gives the same name a few) and for all Kinds doesn't fail to deliver. When last remains of a once flourish-
tongue-in-cheek introduction. of people have made them ex-1 they start playing, they really! ing musical heritage. It may be
Like their theme song, "Lady perts in the art of pleasing a sizzle. Each of, the group mem- some time before they return
be Good," it's a standard fix- crowd. bers has a distinct personality, to Ann Arbor, but they will be
ture of their show and it never! I don't think I'll ever get both temperamentally and mu- performing this summer at the
fails to delight the audience. tired of hearing Carl Martin's sically. Smithsonian Festival in Wash-
After nine months of anticipa- rendition of "You're Nobody; gton D. You are strongly
tion, the group that wowed audi- Until Somebody Loves You." HOWARD is the suave debo- urged to see them before the
ences at last summer's Mari- Despite all their other excellent nair showman, worldly wise. His opportunity becomes lost for-
posa Folk Festival finally made numbers, that song seems to amplified violin and his virtuos- ever,
it to Ann Arbor, playing for capture the essence of Martin, tic playing add a dramatic flair
three nights to a packed Ark, Bogen, and the Armtsrongs. to many of their songs. Ted is Now Showingq
and once again they completely . the quiet one, with a smile that Todav at
captivated their listeners. Now an old man, Carl sings seemingly never leaves his face. 7 and 9:15
During the weekend I learned that song n a way that com- But behind his unassuming ap-
that Howard Armstrong doesn't bines the vigor and sincerity of Bupeinde is unang apr
tha HoardArstrng oes'ta far younger man with the pearance lies a penchant tor ;
pull any punches, and when he satire that comes out in such/
introduces Martin, Bogen and wisdom of an old sage. songs like "The Sweetheart of
the Armstrongs as the last black Sigma Chi." Tom is also quiet,
string band, he's not jiving. ABOVEArmstonartnatBtheir but, like Ted, writes some very
Composed of himself on the and t ongs ant tir funny songs, and always seems
violin, his son, Hom, on the audace tofhve goohtime, to be smoothly on top of it all,
bass, Carl Martin on the man-a fact rfeedrntes fankly, never deflating the group's mo-
doinflashy appearances and per-mentum.

I

r
l

I

FOR THE PUBLIC INTEREST .
ELECTIONS FOR
PIRGIM'S BOARD OF
DIRECTORS WILL BE
H HELD APRIL 6,7, and 8
Any student is eligible to run for one of nine
positions on the Board. To become a candidate,
sign up at the PIRGIM office (4116 Michigan
Union) no later than Thursday, April 1.
For further information CALL 662-6597
Public Interest Research Group in Michigan

formigsye
guitar, the group is the only one oA
of its kind. True, there are On Saturday night they came repr
other black groups, but none of out looking their sharpest - i unex
them have a repertoire that Howard sporting sunglasses, a "Ye
covers the same scope. flowered shirt, and a checkered "do
They play just about any kind coat; Tom in a maroon satin deli
of music that's associated with shirt, black cap and flowered ence
the first third of this century- tie; Carl in a snappy plaid O
Theatre Co.'s'

nd above all, there is the ir-
ressable Carl Martin, whose
xpected interjections of
ah," "Play it boy," and
it again," never fail to
ght and surprise the audi-
e.
N SATURDAY night, one of

From tsJ MR 5 A d &i t AjOl3at .0H IA

Bitch'

0
"

"A fine film."
*--Penelope Gilliatt,
The New Yorker
Swept
Away.
SHOWTIMES
Today at: 7:00 and 9:00

Good

collaboration

By DEBBIE LACUSTA dIe faster and faster. Suddenly, sounded as if it was being trans-
Jesus falls out of his cradle mitted to the audience via a
A CLEVER collaboration of and onto the floor, and the de- high school health teacher. The
talent, material and energy rogatory religious overtones be- well - researched script was on-
made the Theatre Company of come apparent. ly slightly tainted by this lec-r
Ann Arbor' production of ture - like quality.

UAC/eclipse jazz
PRESENTS
CECIL
TAYLOR
IN CONCERT
Thursday, April 15
Power Center--8:00 P.M.
TICKETS GO ON SALE
TODAY TUES., MAR. 30Y
All Seats $4.50 Reserved
TICKETS AT
TICKET CENTRAL, HILL AUDITORIUM

The All-New
IronO Book
to decorate T-shirts, tank tops, or Grondmos favorite sof.
Sixteen creations from those swell folks of NotLompCo,
the company that will sell you anything.
Iron ons riclude pobtracl ' pudowns, purely artistic designs in the
Nationol Lampoon fcshion nd other full-color art ord words and
miscellanea lnr nhy_ never before been seen in the short but
foscinoting history of the 1shirt
These heat-tran sfer designs would ordinarily sell or stores every-
where far $1,00 each instead of 16 for $2.50: but National Lampoon
designs are not availoble at stores anywhere.
The National Lampoon Iron On Book is distributed in bookstores
and on newsstonds on a limited basis and may not be available in
your area If not. you con order it by sending $2.50 to the National
Lampoon.635 Modison Avenue,.New York, New York, 10022. Please
be sure to prnt your name and address, listing your correct zip
code number.

t-11131 t11 VVI .1. X71%Juu"lVli Vl I

Bitch, You Crazy! last week
end a uniquely satisfying ex-
perience.
Every aspect of the play was
presented in a deliberately
simple, dramatic fashion. This
stark atmosphere never became
obstrusive or boring. Rather it
was supposed to reflect the
bleak oppression women have
experienced and their newly-
found consciousness.

The creative musical and
sound arrangements were coor- Innovative, energetic, dis-
dinated to the action with pre- tinctive and powerful - these
cision. In Act I, a psychiatrist all serve as accurate descrip-
babbles about a woman's need tions of Bitch, You Crazy! So,
for taking Lithium, a potential- it was not surprising that this
ly lethal drug. As his petty ;production filled Schorling Au-
speech continues, a bizarre ditorium almost every night.
plinking piano is heard, and the umumiu iuu.I....
audience immediately questions R
his credibility. We'veIt
(OUR LICENSE)
SIX ENERGETIC women so yo e ot it I
created the various characters (SPIRITS)
of the play. Individually, each
kept her singular characteriza-
tion intact, so the audience can - -
easily identify and follow the WITH OUR
different personalities. Collec- ITALIAN -
tively, their dependence upon -DINNERS.
one another became obvious, -
and helped to promote the * B eer
troupe's unity. WITH OUR
PIZZA AND
mt .. .4. - - , - -- i rne o ANDIAjr.tCHF -

NOW SHOW1NG
unrestrained
comedy I

No definable story line is
evidenced in the script, and it
is just as well because the skill-
ful mesh of poetry and songs
provide more depth than many
k conventional, plot - oriented
plays. Each individual scene
flowed smoothly into the next,,
forming a coherent, purposeful
sequence, and the viewer could
easily sense the building tension
so necessary for effective dra-
ma.
BESIDES commenting on the
female oppression issue, Bitch,
You Crazy! also made some
subtle and not so subtle com-
ments on accepted institutions.
An ironic bicentennial com-
mercial, cosmetic manufactur-
ers and marriage were among
those criticized. During one
such memorable instance, cha-
os erupts during an elementary
school Christmas play. The
child playing Joseph begins re-#
citing more than just his lines
- he adds parables and other
Biblical stories, causing the Vir-
gin Mary to become so upset
that she starts rocking the cra-

:t
,t
';t
#
1
I
t
*fL
t

The action and dialogue was
directed toward the audience.
The actresses seemed to be
speaking on a one-to-one basis
to everyone in the audience, A
heightened viewer involvement
was triggered during the game
show segment of Catch Him and
You Keep Him. A rowdy atmos-
phere quickly developed, and
then the audience actually de-
termined the winner, by way
of an applause-o-meter.
THE RELAXED environ-
ment and the total reality cre-
ated on stage hid a minor
flaw. Though the play present-
ed some interesting points of
view on such concerns as drugs,
prostitution and mental retarda-
tion, at times this information

WITH YOUR
FAVORITE
LIQUEUR.
It's a game for any
number of players!
C otta te - Today at:7:15 and 9:00
s ~231 south state,
INN
663.3379
512 EAST WILLIAMSTheatre Phone 64-1
11 ii I, I I Iama

THE DEPARTMENT OF

and THE PROGRAM IN JUDAIC STUDIES

000
S° 0
STATE STREET 0
DELI0
?0,0
STAUEAT .,
TRAY CATERING
Sandwiches-Salads--Omelets-Cheesecake
TRAY CATERING A SPECIALTY

announce a lecture by
David C. Jacobson
UCLA

entitled

I he Neo-Hasidic Study in Early
Twentieth Century Hebrew Literature"

3050 FRIEZE BLDG.

TUESDAY, MARCH 30-4:00 P.M.

AL JOLSON in 1928
THE JAZZ SINGER
(AT 7)
A young cantor feels the pull of bright lights
and jazz music. So Hollywood puts on one of
its biggest shows . .. and introduces talkies.
CHARLES V1DOfR'S 1946

_. U .,'° . . , . 'i: '' r_ ,

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