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March 28, 1976 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-03-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sund,

day, March 28, 1,976

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunc iay, March28, 1976

MONDAY, MAR. 29-4-6 P.M.-AUD. B, ANGELL
YANKEES and COWBOYS
from DALLAS to WATERGATE
Six talks by Carl Oglesby highlighting significant points in the decade covered by
New Left politics of the 60's-through the SDS/Weather/Greening of American
transformation-to the present "Post-Watergate" period.
CARL OGLESB1Y)
Carl will also be mteting with 2 classes in Residential College with
Marilyn Young.
Tues., 11-12:30: Foreign Policy & Vietnam-Room 126 E. Quad
1 Tues., 2-3:30: Literature &Politics-Room 126 E. Quad
Carl will be in-residence for three weeks supported by a group of students and faculty
together with University and Campus Ministry organizations. There will be oppor-
tunities for extended conversations with him around material from the talks and any
other subiect of mutual interest. Please contact Guild House, 802 Monroe, 662-5189
or Ethics and Religion, 3204 Union, 764-7442.

I

London
76, IR
SS
By AP and Reuter
LONDON - Seventy-six peo-
ple, including several children,
were injured here yesterday
when a bomb planted without
warning by Irish guerrillas ex-
ploded at a crowded exhibition
center.

a
A

blast injures
responsible

"A fine film."
-Penelope Gilliatt.
The New Yorker
"Swept,,
Away.
SHOWTIMES
Today at 1, 3, 5, 7&9
M.I 611rsity

I
i

"Love

_._._

i
i

Revised Schedule for Biology 105:
Introduction to Biology

The information in the printed T
that follows is the one that will
DIVISION 328

Time Schedule is incorrect. The schedule
be used for the Fall Term.

Section 001
Section 002

*Lecture
Discussion

002 Recitation

Sectiona
Section
Section
Sectiona
Section

003
003
004
004
005
005
006
005
007
007

Discussion
Recitation
Discussion
Recitation
Discussion
Recitation
Discussion
Recitation
Discussion
Recitation
Discussion
Recitation
Discussion

M 12:00-2:00
Tu 9-10
Thur 3-5 p.m.
Tu 10-11
Thur 3-5 p.m.
Tu 11-12
Thur 3-5 p.m.
Tu 9-10
Thur 7-9 p.m.
Tu 10-11
Thur 7-9 p.m.
Tu 11-12
Th 7-9 p.m.
Tu 9-10
Fri 1-3 p.m.
Tu 10-11
Fri 1-3 p.m.'
Tu 11-12
Fri 1-3

GEORGE
p.m.

EASTABROOK
Aud B AH

3056
4014

3056 NS
3082 NS
3056 NS
3056 NS
1053 NS
3056 NS
1053 NS
2111 NS
1053 NS
TBA
2111 NS
3056 NS
2111 NS
2111 NS
2111 NS
TBA

NS
NS

I
I
E
d
i
S
1
t
E
{
7
I
I
t
!i
i
t
i
I

i

NOW SHOWING
Not
Now
Darling
Today at 5:30-7:15-9:00
special cildrens'
matinee 1. & 3
S A he t e P one 60 40 4

tAMp u S.
I Theotre Phone 668-6416

tyenemy".
0OO
This is a religious precept that
challenges the mind. Love my en-
emy when I can barely deal calmly
with my in-laws? Yet this hard say-
ing has validity in a world where
even a small act of violence has
such unforeseeable repercussions.
Scientific advances have heighten-
ed our mutual vulnerability. Only
love and non-violence can sustain
us. We may concede violence is in
all of us. So is God. Try His way.
It works. Get together with your
family, friends, neighbors, or co-
workers to discuss the problems of
violence and how you can work to-
gether to help solve them. For a
helpful discussion guide and.fur-
ther information write: Religion In
American Life, 475 Fifth Ave., New
York, N.Y. 10017. Play an active
role in your communityRIAL
and help show the way. R , AERANL

s trik e
settled
(Continued from Page 1)
more than 12 hours of talks Fri-
day. "Both sides have agreed
to keep quiet on the details un-
til after the (EMU) Board of
Regents has ratified the con-
tract,". he said.
While the next meeting of
university regents is not sched-
uled until the third Wednesday
in April, Hawks felt that "They
may consent to an earlier meet-
ing in this special case."
Midwest's Larest Selection of
European Charters
Canadian and U.S.
from $259
CALL 769-1776
-Great Places
TRAVEL CONSULTANTS
216 S. 4th Ave, Ann Arbor

Four of the injured lost limbs
and two were in critical condi-
tion after emergency operations,
according to hospital spokes-
men.
POLICE SAID the bomb, the
fourteenth in London this year
EMIU

in what security sources have
called the Irish Republican Ar-
my (IRA) "spring offensive"
contained about two pounds of
explosives. It was hidden in a
garbage can near an escalator!
on the first floor of the Olym-
pia Center.
"There were bleeding bodies
lying all over the floor," one
witness said. "People were
running and screaming to the
exits and others just standingI
around crying."j
A Scotland Yard spokesman
said the bomber apparently
aimed for maximum casualties
by placing the device in a plas-
tic trash container in a "do-it-
yourself" section of the home
products show. About 15,000
persons attending the exhibiton
in the hall located at Earl's
Court were evacuated.
POLICE said the location of
the bomb - was deliberately
chosen to kill or maim as many
people as possible.
It was the worst explosion in
London since 1973 when a car
bomb went off near the Old
Bailey central criminal court,
injuring 244 people.
Detective Chief Superinten-
dent Jim Nevill, deputy head of'
the anti-terrorist squad, said it
was "mere chance" that there
had been no fatalities at the
Olympia Center.
THE FIRST floor of the Olym-
pia building, crammed with
visitors at the time, was filled

The community of God.
Make it your wa.

with cries and scream after the
blast as dozen of people fell
bleeding to the floor.
One young man, who was
injured and did not want to be
identified, said:
"Me and my grilfriend were
about 15 yards from the rub-
bish bin when suddenly a lot of
white smoke started coming out
of it. Then, it just went off. I
saw it in slow motion - a bang
and then these bits flying up in
the air."
JOHN JACQUES, of London,
saw "bleeding bodies lying all
over the floor. One young wo-
man I tried to comfort had a
hole in her thigh big enough for
me to put my hand in."
Dorothy Yerby, of Hanwell in
Middlesex, said: "We were two
of the lucky ones. If my boy-
friend and I had been ten yards
back, we would have been
among the bodies on the floor."
"People started to run
screaming in the panic to get
away," Yerby said. "I had to
climb over bodies. There were
ten or 12. One man's leg was
in shreds. It was gruesome and
I tried not to look."
A man with an Irish accent
'and quoting a codeword later
telephoned a newspaper office
in Manchester, saying: "This is
a warning to the British govern-
ment to take their troops out of
Northern Ireland. More bombs
are on the way if this demand
is not met."

SHRP blames ills
on student apathy

ARAMC S14 d h*NWAMEW fA71~W PeWVM

ji

* NOTICE *
POSITIONS ARE AVAILABLE FOR
WORK STUDY STUDENTS
Please see Beth or Cassie
420 MAYNARD-764-0560

(Continued from Page 1)
mostly about Democratic party
platforms through their unions
and blue collar workers can't
relate to a far leftist lifestyle.
Meanwhile, student support is
waning. "I haven't seen as
much student interest in city,
government this year as last

SHRP MEMBER Larry Bas-
sett, however, contends that the
party really has no place at all
in the electoral process. He
points out that the SHRP has a
rapid turnover of sympathizers,
while the city's other political
figures have permanent, hard-
core support.

Section 008
008
Section 009

009 Recitation
Section 010 Discussion
010 Recitation

year," said Kohn. "Electoral politics demands
some kind of continuity," re-
Kohn hopes to recapture stu- marked Bassett, so the party
dent interest by campaigning in has directed more of its efforts
the dorms, especially E a s t to dealing with long-term issues
Quad, this week. than with temporal candidates.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
"., r.!..4,r"f:r}{}} :J:;":::F}I~~f:{:{Y$S 5,.:""{:;;?.:"}"";;;;: :"ii::'^.::.i;:;:t;r:%:" itvS{ ;;v'' ;}~;

*Regular use of the lab in Room 2004 is necessary to complete course requirements. It
is open Tues., Wed., Thurs., 1-10 p.m. Students should plan 3 hour blocks of lab time
per week, a pre-lab discussion period on Tuesday and a post lab recitation on Thursday
or Friday. All students must register for Section 1 and also one other section. Questions
concernina enrollment should be directed to Barbara Bowen, 2017 Nat. Sci. Biol. 105
may be substituted wherever Biol. 106 is a prerequisite; those who elect. Biol. 105
after completina Biol. 100 will lose credit for the earlier course.

U

NOW LEASING FOR FALL!v
ROOMS at Newly Renovated CHABAD HOUSE
715 HILL ST. (Corner Oakland and Hill)
With a Newly Modern KOSHER Food Service on Premises!
SPACE LIMITED (non-Coed) $'
For Information Call: s .,

Sunday, March 28
Day Calendar
TV Ctr.: Artist at Work. The
Eyes Have It, wwJ TV, channel 4,
noon.
WUOM: The States of the 'Union
- NPR bicentennial documentaary;
featured state, Nebraska, 1 pm.
UAC Musket: Hello Dolly, Power,
2 pm only.
Music School: Degree Recitals -
Randolph Blouse, trumpet, Recital
Hall, 2 pm; Pamela Dameron, pi-
ano, Recital Hall, 4 m; Eric Maddox,
piano, Recital Hall, 6 pm; Herman
Taylor, DMA organ, Hill Aud., 8
pm; Diane Zola, soprano, Recital
Hall, 8 pm; Chamber Orchestra, Hill
Aud., 4 pm; aMaizin' Blues, Rack-
ham Aud., 7:30 pm; Horn Recital --
Cady Rm., Stearns, 8 pm.

C

PLPAI

orrm
MB&M

I

S.missing out
on some of the
DAILIES because
of delivery
mistakes?

DNA
"Committee B Report"
Mon.: March 29
Rackham Amphitheater
12:15-2:00
FEATURING:
Prof. Shaw Livermore
"B" member & chairman of
"Univ. Values Seminar"
DROBNY
FU RTADO
PACKARD
WORK IN FIBER
March 1-April 4
UNION GA[ERY
First Floor
MICHIGAN UNION
T-F 10-6, S S 12-6

PTP: "Feelin' Good," musical tri-
bute to black entertainers, Nat'l
Theatre Co., Trueblood Theatre,
Frieze, 8 pm.
Hillel: Emil Fackenheim, {'This
Moment in Jewish History," Hillel,
8 pm.
Monday, March 29
WUOM. t'Guernica," program on
war w/dramatic excerpts, readings
by Sandburg & Burton, newscast
by E. R. Murroy, & music, 10 am.
CEW: "Alternative Family Styles
and Patterns," 328-330 Thompson
St., noon.
william Cook Lectures on Ameri-
can Institutions: Richard E. Neu-
stadt, Presidential Power Revisited:
Reflections on Johnson and Nixon,
Legitimacy and Loyalty," 100 Hut-
ihins Hall, 3:15 pm.
Anthropology: Maxwell Owusu,
"Ethnography of Africa: The Use-
fulness of the Useless," E. Conf.
Rm., Rackham, 4 pm.
Industrial, Operations Eng.: Paul
Maine, TRW Inc., Cleveland, OH,
"Human Relations Aspects of Men-
ufacturing," W. Eng., 4 nm.
Guild House. Carl Oglesby, "Dal-
las II. An Effort to get at the
Truth of the Killing of JFK," Aud.
B, Angell, 4-6 pm.
Physics: T. Pawicki, Argonne
Nat'l Lab, "f, f' and A02 Interfer-
ence in Pi - p - K plus K -n,"
2038 Randall Lab, 4:15 pm.
Physiology Lectures, Films: "Di-
gestion and Organic Metabolism,"
S. Lec. Hall, Med. Sdi. II, 7 pm.
Musical society: Pennsylvania
Ballet. Power, 8 pm.
Music School: Degree Recital -
Bruce Cowan, DMA clarinet, Re-
cital Hall, 8 pm.
Summer Placement
3200 SAB, 763-4117
Camp Sequoia. Mi. Coed. Will in-
terview Mon. Apr. 5, from 1 to 5.
Openings include Riding (western)
and Riflery Instr. Register.
Camp Tamarack, Mi. Coed. Will
interview Weds. Mar. 31, from 9 to
5. Remaining openings include
nurses, bus driver, male counselors
in all fields, case/social worker,
asst. cooks and kitchen staff. Reg-
ist er.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 145
sunday, March 28, 1976
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a 1 y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor
summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; .$7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

OR

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VOTE in the
University Housing
Council Election
THIS WEEK

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