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February 17, 1976 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-02-17

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Tuesday, February 17 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

'U

.... .

Med labs charged
with profteering

AMBASSADOR OK:
Envoy unharmed by ra

WASHINGTON (AP) - Kick-
backs, fradulent billing and
overpayments involving a few
medical laboratories wastes al-
most $1 out of $5 paid out for
Medicare and Medicaid lab ser-
vices, a Senate committee was
told yesterday.
"It is our judgment that at'
least $45 million of the $213 mil-
lion in Medicare and Medicaid
payments for clinical laborator-
ies is either fraudulent or un-
necessary," the staff of the spe-
cial Committee on Aging said.
CHAIRMAN Frank Moss (D-
Utah) made the. report public
in resuming hearings on fraud
and abuse in the programs.
The report said'that "numeri-
cally the number of offenders
identified in investigation is
small but their proportion of
public funds for lab service is
large.
"In New York 17 clinical lab-
oratories controlled 70 per cent
of the Medicaid business" the
report said. "In New Jersey, a
dozen clinics controlled more
than 60 per cent of Medicaid
funds. In Illinois, the 21 labs
under the subcommittee's scru-
tiny controlled 80 per cent of
the state's Medicaid business."
THE STAFF said it appears
from its findings in other states
"that kickbacks are so ram-
pant that laboratories are al-
most barred from obtaining a
Medicaid account less they of-
fer a kickback" to physicians.
'The report focused on Illi-
nois, but mentioned Pennsylva-
nia and California as ,well as
New York, New Jersey as states
where abuses occurred.
Under the Medicaid program,
state and federal governments
will pay a total of about $180.5
million in the current fiscal
year to laboratories for analysis
of blood and other specimens
taken from the poor, aged, blind
and disabled. Another $32.5 mil-
lion is paid for Medicare for
persons 65 years and older.

free by its own health depart-
ment."
Frank Holstein executive di-
rector of the New Jersey State
Commission of- Investigation,
testified that "shortcomings and
loopholes which had developed
in the New Jersey Medicaid
program presented a virtual
open door to those laboratory
owners to profiteer at the tax-
payers' expense."
Holstein cited one instance in
which seven parts of a test per-
formed by Park Medical Labor-
atory by an automated labora-
tory at a cost of $3.40 were bill-
ed to Medicaid'for a total of
$58. 'This is almost five times
the maximum possible reim-
bursement of $12.50," he said.
Despite continuing inflation,
the basic toll rates on the New
Jersey Turnpike have been
raised only once in its 25 year
history.

By AP and Reuter
MOSCOW - The American
Embassy yesterday termed "in-
accurate and misleading" a
published report that U.S. Am-
bassador Walter Stoessel has a
mysterious blood ailment pos-
sibly caused of aggravated by
high level microwaves beamed
at the embassy by the Soviets.
It said Stoessel has gone
cross-country skiing and played
paddle tennis in recent days.
THE BOSTON GLOBE yes-
terday quoted sources as say-
ing Stoessel's alleged ailment
resembles leukemia and was a
major factor leading to an
American protest 'to the Krem-
lin over microwave transmis-
sions.
A U.S. Embassy spokesperson
in Moscow, asked to comment
on the Globe story, said: "We
have seen various stories about

the ambassador's health, all of
which are inaccurate and mis-
leading. It would not be appro-
priate to comment specifically
on the ambassador's health or
on that of any other individual.
"However, the ambassador
feels fine, keeps a busysched-
ule, leads an active life, has
not undergone medical treat-
ment and is not at the present
time undergoing medical treat-
ment."
EARLIER NEWS accounts out
of Moscow said Western resi-
dents assume the Soviets are
directing a microwave bugging
device toward a section of the
embassy's three top floors

where classified work. is con-
ducted.
A State Department medical
technician is in Moscow, ap-
parently to check blood samples
of embassy staffers to deter-
mine if the radiation level has
created hazards.
But no one in authority would
say whether any illness related
to the radiation had been dis-
covered. "No comment" respon-
ses were given to newsmen who
posed such questions.
OFFICIALS WOULD only re-
fer to Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger's statement Thursday
that beaming is a "matter of

diation
great complexity and sensitivi-
ty" and that "unilateral efforts
to reduce the danger" have
been made.
MEANWHILE, Soviet Ambas-
sador Anatoliy Dobrynin visited
the White House yesterday for a
meeting shrouded in unusual
secrecy.
There was immediate specu-,
lation that the visit might con-
cern reports that the U.S. em-
bassy in Moscow had been sub-
jected to radiation from high
frequency radio waves.
- ~ ~

THE CENTER FOR NEAR EASTERN
AND NORTH AFRICAN STUDIES
LECTURE: Dr. Nadav Halevi
Director of Research, The Maurice Falk Institute for
Economic Research in Israel
TITLE: Economic Factors in the
Arab-Israeli Conflict
TIME: Wednesday, Feb. 18 at 4:00
PLACE: 200 Lane Hall

..

--

STEVE'S LUNCH
1313 SO. UNIVERSITY
HOME COOKING IS OUR SPECIALTY

WE'RE THE
OLDEST
CAR RENTAL
* IN ANN ARBOR
With the
NEWEST
MODELS
Chevette Malibu
Nova Monte Carlo
Vega LTD
Pinto Elite
Datson 240Z Torino
Mark IV Limo
ECO N O-CAR
438 W. HURON
663-2033

Breakfast All Day
3 Eqqs,'Hash Browns,
Toast 6 Jell--$1.25
Ham or Bacon or Sausae
with 3 Eq, Hash Browns,
Toast 6' Jelly--$l.85

EVERYDAY SPECIALS
Beef Stroganoff
Chinese Pepper Steak -
Ea Rolls
Home-made Soups, Beef,
Barley. Clam Chowder, etc.
Home-made Chili
Vegetable Tempuro
(served after 2 p.m.)
Hamburqer Steak Dinner-
( / lb.) $2.25
Spaghetti in Wine Sauce
Beef Curry Rice
Baked Flounder Dinner
1 lb. Roost Beef Kaiser Roll
Delicious Korean Bap-b-a Beef
(served after 4 daily) -
Fried Fresh Bean Sprouts
Kim-Chee

3 Eaus, Ribe Eye Steak,
Hash Browns, Toastk
I Jelly-$2.25

I

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
r ri.}::>kyr.+: aV":rr.r.. at:" :4..z r?:53" W + M'". Mt.".rQ v.}"' } db~.:; r."e rs..;

We make Three Eqq Omlets
-Western Omlet
-Bean Sprout Omlet

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Uni-
versity of Michigan. Notices
should be sent in TYPEWRIT-
TEN FORM to 409 E. Jefferson,
before 2 p.m. of the day pre-
ceding publication and by 2
p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear only once.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication.
For more information, phone
164-9276.
Tuesday, February 17
DAY CALENDAR
WUOM: Dr. ArthurShostak, Drexal
U., Philadelphia, on problems & at-
titudes of working people, 10 a.m.
Commission for women: Coffee,
conversation, Returning Students'
Lounge, 3205 Union, 11 a.m.
CEw: Brown bag, Prudence Brown,
"women Coping with Divorce," 328
Thompson, noon.
Music School: String dept reictla,
Recital Hall, 12:30 p.m.; DMA pro-'
gram - Brenda Kee, Piano Cham-
ber Music, Recital Hall, 8 p.m.
Behavioral Science: Elizabeth Dou-
van, ."Sex Differences," Lee. Rm. 2,
MLB, 3 p.m.
Future worlds: David Brower,
pres.. Friends of the Earth, "Envi-
ronmental Imperatives for the Fu-
ture," Hill Aud., 3 p m.
Biophysics Seminar: Leon Mc-
Caughan, "Interaction of Poly-L-
lysine with Red Cell Membranes,"
618 P&A Bldg., 3 p.m.
Atomic Physics Seminar: Garbiel
Karl, Guelph U., "Parity violation
in Atoms," 1041 Randall Lab, 4 p.m.
Great Lakes Research: Everett Fee,
Freshwater Inst., Canada, 'The
vertical and Seasonal Distribution
of Chlorophyll in Lakes of the Ex-
perimental Lakes Area: Implications
for Primary Production Estimates,"
white Aud., Cooley Lab, 4 p.m
English: Judith Minty, poetry
reading, Pendleton Rm., Union, 4:10
p.m.
Computing Ctr.: Short course, An-
drew C. Goodrich, "The Integrated
Graphics Routines: An Introduction
to Programming with 10," Seminar
Rm., 1st f1r., C.C., N Campus, 7:30
p.m.
Ctr. Study, Higher Educ.: Roger
w. Heyns, Pres., Amer. Council on

IN
said
was

NEW JERSEY, the report
"in some cases the state
even billed for tests run

Educ ; John A. Peoples, Jr., pres.,
Jackson State College, "Leadership
Trends in Higher Education," 1309
SEB, 7:30 p.m.
wUOM: The New York Philhar-
monic, Boulez, conductor, 8:05 p.m.
PTP: Davis' Purlie, Power, 8 p.m.
GENERAL NOTICES
Course Mart Deadline: Proposals
for Fall 1976 Course Mart offerings
must be submitted to 2501 LSA by
Feb. 20; proposals welcome from
anyone with expertise in academic
areanot now covered by LSA cur-
riculum,
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 SAB, 763-4117
Interviews: Register by phone or
in person
Camp Maplehurst, MI. Coed: In-
terview Tues., Feb. 24, 1-5; open-
ings include general counselors,
specialists & others; register.
Camp Tamarack, MI. Coed: Inter-
view wed., Feb._ 25, 9-12, & Fri.,
Feb 27, 9-5; openings include gen-
eral counselors, specialists, supervi-
sors, cooks & nurses; register.
Camp Lakeside Farm Camp &
watervliet, MI. Coed: Interview
Thurs., Feb. 26, 10-5; openings in-
clude maintenance, cooks, arts/
crafts, waterfront (WSI), riding,
couple with farm experience, oth-
ers; register.
Irish Hills G. S. Council, MI., In-
terview Thurs., Feb. 26, 9-5; open-
ings include general counselors,
specialists, many others
S"
GAME POSTERS
Put Boardwalk or Park Place on your wall Hang
the Reading Railroad or Electric Company.
Ea ch poster is a unique, inexpens ive wall deco-
ration. Easy to mat, frame or hang as is.
17" X 22" litho reproductions on 80-lb. Saxony
enamel. Posters enlarged directly from game
cards for authenticity with slight line and type
separation.
P Boardwalk or Park Place
* The Railroads-Reading, Pennsylvania,
theRaigRaodor Electric Company (lc nWie.
Each oIpostersenunique, inepensti adco-
cedcekor money orer with choies:
TheRailrosE d , Pennsy o n, 3
TH OSOPO LI IS 69W 17

-

{ .

...r.... 1

VAN HEUSENO

Medicine

Dentistry
Qsteopaithy
Veterinary

PRE-PROFESSIONAL
INFORMATION, MEETING
FOR UPPERCLASS STUDENTS

VAN
dual
DRESS SHIRT AND
SPORT SHIRT
.. .weart
YoUr way!
Here's your chance
at a Van Heusen
first. A one-piece,
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One smooth-flow-
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neckband. No in-
terruption to the
pattern or solid of
your choice. Open
or closed, it will do
things for you. Seo
for yourself -- on
yourself.

Tft MICRIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 118
Tuesday, February 17, 1976
-is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a11 y Tuesday through
Sundaymorning during the Univer-
sity year at.420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.:
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

,- :~k i
} f4 'I
,.. s" I

iI
ti a

Monday-Saturdav 8-8
Sunday 10-8
769-2288
1313 Sb. University

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CAREER

Tues., Feb. 17
7:30 p.m.
1025 Angell Hall

Planning &
Placement

TAKE A

Information on credentials, letters of
recommendation, evaluation, regis-
tration; procedures for admission,
etc.

BREAK

Pick -a- hump
1 [Ihere're lots of ways to get to Israel. We've got two. Long-term and short-term

. . .

in the

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BAHAMAS
Dates of Trip: MARCH 6-13
Destination: FREEPORT BAHAMAS
Stay in the CASTAWAYS HOTEL
on22 00
+ 10% + $3.00
Includes Air NON-STOP on Northwest Orient,
Hotel; Transfers, Baggage Handling, & Meals
in Flight.
OPEN TO U-M STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF
LIMITED SPACES STILL AVAILABLE
$25.00 deposit reauired to hold reservation
CAMPUS INTERNATIONAL
Contact: Rosanne at 761-4965

1

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Sam re

programs.
And these two ways actually offer you 22 different options of thir'gs to do in
Israel,
On the one hump we offer short-term programs that last a summer. There are
12 of these in all. Kibbutz programs. Work/study programs. Archaeology digs.
Ulpans. Science programs. And more.
On the other hump we offer long-term programs for a semester, 6 months or a
year. There are 10 in all. Work/study programs at Israeli Universities. Volunteer pro-
grams in Development Towns and kibbutzim. Professional placement programs.
And more.
All in all, we offer you a caravan of programs to choose from that include
roundtrip air transportation, room, board, tuition fees (if applicable), and touring
through Israel for one inclusive price.
Return the coupon below for our catalogue, further information and the num-
ber of our office or representative nearest you.
Of our two ways to Israel, one hump is right for you.
1"
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