100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 30, 1976 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-01-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, January 30, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Friday, January 30, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.

FROSH ADMISSIONS:

Student files sit.

Open file law has few effects! demands voluntary

wet~e & k $q

By JAY LEVIN
A 1974 congressional act which
grants students access to their
own academic record files has
had an insignificant effect on
freshperson admission proced-
ures, according to Cliff Sjogren,
University director of admis-
sions.
Despite a Time Magazine re-
port this week contending that
the act has resulted in the ob-
solescence of high school coun-
selor recommendations, Sjo-
gren's office has not changed
any of its policies.
"WE HAVE never looked at
recommendations as a major
criteria for admission," said
Sjogren. "I can never remem-
ber rejecting a student because
a counselor says he doesn't be-
long at Michigan."

Because of the opening of rec-
ords to students and their par-
ents, said Time, counselors have
either refused to write recom-
mendations or have been wary
of writing negative letters, forc-
ing colleges to shift emphasis
from the letters to standardized
test scores.
"We place as much emphasis
on the SATs now as we did ten
years ago," said Sjogren, refut-
ing Time's report.
PASSING the counselor com-
ments off as generally "insig-
nificant stuff," Sjogren said
that only relevant comments,
such as those pertaining to for-
eign students or explaining a
poor grade, are useful.
"Most tell us absolutely noth-
ing, and never have from a pub-

lic institution's point of view,";
he said.
The law has also had a negli-
gible effect on University Med-
ical School admissions, accord-
ing to Assistant Dean Colin
Campbell.
BECAUSE of the so-called
"Buckley Law," named for New
York Senator James Buckley
who pushed the act through
Congress, many high schools do
not provide counselor or teacher
comments on the college appli-
cations.
However, Sjogren a d m i t s,
"the spirit of the law is tre-
mendous. What it is intended to
do is great. We subscribe to the
bill one hundred per cent and
it is reflected in our applica-
tions."

'Admissions counselor V e r n
Jensen also sees the law's good
points.
"IT STOPPED, pretty much,
the practice of counselors in-
cluding things in the recom-
mendation that have no business
being there in the first place,
such as the student's family
situation," he said.
Local high school counselors
have responded directly to the
law.
"I think it's a good law. Some-
time things have been written
which aren't too useful," said a
counselor from Ann Arbor Pio-
neer High School. "You try to
write as positive a recommen-
dation as you can. You work
hard to put down a good pic-
ture."

funding of MSA
By MIKE NORTON "No," Matthews said flatly.'
. "The proper thing is for CSJ
A University student filed suit (Central Student Judiciary) to
yesterday against the Michigan tell MSA to release the money,
Student Assembly (MSA), de- and th
manding immediate implemen- Regents don't even enter into I
tation of voluntary funding for this: the students voted for vol-
student government. untary funding."
"I'm filing this suit because Goodman argued that the con-
the students ordered voluntary stitutionality of the measure was
funding, and I want to see them I still in doubt, and thatsrelease
get it," said Bob Matthe'ws. of the funds under an uncon-
STUDENT voters approved stitutional order was unthink-
the measure in November. It able.
would replace the existing sys- "There are some constitution-
tem, which assesses 75 cents al problems, yes," Matthews ad-
per student. But MSA has de- mitted. "The proposal wasn't
layed until the Board of Regents really written too well. But the
gives its approval. fact remains that there is an
Matthews is insisting that the amendment stating, 'funding
MSA release all funds collected shall be voluntary,' and that's
'so far and apply them as credits what's important. Now it's up
to student accounts. to CSJ to decide."

,
nc.o oOn'
_..
_ ,_.
_ --(
-- .-
i

WE ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE
AT
OPEN HOUSE
FOR OUR
FRIENDS AND PATRONS
ON
SUNDAY, FEB. 1ST
from 12-5 p.m.
-REFRESHMENTS SERVED-

'Loot': A dated, but
humorous production

House considers new
marijuana legislation
(Continued from Page 1) THE BILL in its current form
fight it. has been endorsed by a number
The other change would simply of groups, including Ingham
make possession punishable by County Sheriff Kenneth Pread-
the current penalty. more, the Genesee County Pro-

WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IF A
PROFESSOR ACCUSED YOU
OF CHEATING ON AN EXAM???
I f you're an LSA student, you would probably
have a hearing before the
LSA Academic Judiciary
The Judiciary handles most cases of alleged cheating and
plaoerism in the College, and that probably makes it
the most important committee that students sit on in LSA.
The Judiciary is composed of 7 students and 7 faculty
members. However, the LSA STUDENT GOVERNMENT is
currently filling four vacant student positions.
If you are interested in applying, you must sign up for an
interview at the LSA Student Government office--Room
4001 Michigan Union.
DEADLINE FOR APPLYING IS SUNDAY,
FEB. 1, 1976 at 5:00 p.m.

(Continued from Page 5)
your eyes for a moment, and
we might almost be back in
the madly creative sixties, when
the cast of Hair was taking
potshotstat LBJ and Rowan and
Martin stirred 'em up on Laugh-
in.

The satirical targets of Loot
are strawmen. The Catholic
Church, the police, bureaucra-
cy - it takes less than a devas-
tating wit to,.demolish these.
But still, those old tired gags
are funny.

t
t
.
.

PIRGIM defends
present fee system

"It's as simple as

that," he

i

(Continued from Page 1)
"At the universities of Mary-
land and Massachusetts," the
memorandum said, "the fee was
to be collected from all students
as a condition of enrollment
and class attendance. Both opin-
ions rested squarely on this
fact."
The current PIRGIM fee
method automatically assesses
all students a $1.50 charge each
term but allows them to apply
for a credit in the same amount
by returning a form with their
tuition payment.
PETRINI SAID Daane's as-
sumption that the current fee
collection constitutes "manda-
tory" billing is wrong. He said
the assessment can be termed
"voluntary," because "students
never need pay if they signify
they do not wish to pay." He
cites a Colorado case which up-
held a refundable fee system as
"voluntary."
But Daane said yesterday the
PIRGIM system is involuntary
because "when a university in-
cludes something on its bill, it
is a demand for money."
"A voluntary contribution,"
Daane said, "would require an
affirmative act by the student
agreeing to pay," and an invol-
untary contribution involves an
affirmative action to avoid pay-
ment.
While the PIRGIM system is
refundable, Daane said, "it's
the nature of the original assess-
ment that I regard as involun-
tary."
PETRINI ALSO argued that
a case involving the Oregon
public interest group upholds a
fee collection which is "far less
voluntary"' than Michigan's.
Petrini blasted Daane's con-
tention that PIRGIM's activities
are not substantially related to
the University's educational pur-
poses. "PIRGIM's activities en-
able . .. students to explore first-
hand the possibilities and prob-
lems of institutional change,"
Petrini said.
"Students work on a broad
range of issues," he continued,
"from energy policy to health
care delivery to product safety,
under the supervision of
PIRGIM's full-time professional
staff."
Daane, however, said yester-
day: "I do not think the Uni-
versity is in the business of lob-
bying for . .. a wide variety of
social issues" contained in state
legislation.
DAANE SAID he did not
mean to imply PIRGIM's goals
were not worthwhile, but that
they were "not sufficiently the
same as those of the Univer-
sity."
He said that "most of the
length" of Petrini's 18 - page
memorandum "r e s u l t s from
PIRGIM's propensity of setting
up straw men in order to knock
them down,"

The Regents are scheduled to I
take action next week to deter-I
mine a legal method of collec-
tion of the PIRGIM fee.3
FOR PIRGIM, the heart oft
the controversy over fee col-
lection systems is their impact1
on revenue. Under a system
used from 1972 to 1975, when
students registered for classes
and indicated acceptance of the
PIRGIM fee at Waterman Gym-t
nasium, approximately 50 per
cent of the students agreed to1
accept the $1.50 assessment. e
When the University intro-
duced its "CRISP" registration
system, however, PIRGIM
switched to the system used
last fall. Students were told they
had to ask for a credit at the1
Student Accounts Office of thec
Student Activities Building, dur-
ing a specified week, or the
$1.50 would be levied automatic- f
ally.
The system angered many
students who felt it was wrong
to inconvenience those stu-
dents who chose not to contri-
bute. Some complained that
the one-week period was not
long enough.
BUT IN a surprising paren-
thetical statement in his mem-
orandum, Petrini reveals: "In
fact, by agreement with PIR-
GIM, all requests for PIRGIM
fee credits were honored by the
University, at any time in the
term, whether made in person
or by letter or telephone call
to v a r i o u s University of-
fices . ."
Jobless
rate up
to 11
(Continued from Page 1)
cutbacks were made at the Uni-
versity level due to the end of
fall semester. The need for_
services requiring part time help
usually falls off around that
time," she said.
Fletcher is not too optimisticI
about January unemployment
rates.
"WE EXPECT unemployment
to rise more in January because
of retail trade layoffs that oc-
cur after the Christmas rush,"
she said.
The increase in sales produc-'
tion that began before the
Christmas shopping rush is be-
ginning to slacken, and unem-
ployment will rise as a result.
Fletcher added that when
winter arrives "seasonal lay-
offs in the construction industry
begin" and continue until the
weather warms up.

DESPITE these proposed re-
visions, the biggest obstacle to
passage of the marijuana bill
appears to have been avoided.
Last fall, Judiciary Commit-
tee Chairman Paul Rosenbaum
(D. - Grand Rapids) threat-
ened to have the bill sent to
his committee once it was re-
ported to the House by the Civil
Rights Committee.
"I am not pursuing it (his in-
tended course), though I expect
some other members may pro-
pose it," Rosenbaum said..
Bullard, a long-time advocate
of marijuana legalization, pre-
dicts a fierce battle over the
bill.
"IT IS going to be an ex-
tremely close battle," he said.
"The most important thing is
to get it through the House."
Once in the Senate, Bullard
believes the bill can be amend-
ed to resemble the Oregon law,
which makes possession of
small amounts of marijuana a
civil offense.
The bill is scheduled for a
vote February 3. It may be
postponed, however, until an-
other bill dealing with heroin
laws has been voted on Febru-
ary 10.
Passport
Photos
3 prints each
of 3 photos
for $7.50
FULL COLOR-not
Polaroid® and your
negatives are included.
EASY DRIVING AND
PARKING
No Appointment Necessary
SUN PHOTO
3180 PACKARD
1 Blk. E. of Platt
973-0770
8:30-9:00 M & F
8:30-5:30 T, W, T, S

secutor, and several drug abuse
centers.
The State Police told the Civil
Rights Committee it would sup-
port a bill which provided 901
day jail sentences.I
In December State Supreme,
Court Chief Justice Thomas
IKavanagh came out in favor
of decriminalization, saying
marijuana laws are not "the I
government's business."
GOVERNOR William{
Milliken's State of the State
message also backs marijuana,
reform. He said; "I believe that t
the legislature should act to re-
duce the penalties for posses-<
sion (of marijuana) in order
that we may be able to devote'
a greater share of our crime_
resources to the fight against
hard drugs and other crimes."
According to State Police, the
total number of marijuana ar-
rests has increased from 2,800I
in 1969 to almost 20,000 in 1974.
The National Geographic So-
ciety was founded in 1888 "for
the increase and diffusion of
geographic knowledge."
.. THURSDAY, FRIDAY
AND SATURDAY
NIGHTS:
t
Melodioso
at the
MONDAY NIGHT:
oSilvertonesv
'0 &
314 S. FOURTH AVE.v
[Across from the new
Federal Bldg 1
---------- ---- - ~

said.
Former SGC president Debra
Goodman was enraged at Matt-
hews' action.
"Destructive, irresponsible in-
dividuals like him (Matthews)
keep stirring things up and pre-
vent us from doing our jobs,"
she said.
Goodman said she felt Matt-
hews was unjustified in bring-
ing suit until voluntary funding
had been brought before the
Regents.I
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 103
Friday, January 30, 1976
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
1Published d a 11I y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept.thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Sun., Feb. 1st
H I LLEL
BRUNCH 11 A.M.
PROF. URI ZAMIR
Speaking on "ISRAEL--a
generation from now."
$1.00
12:30-Israeli Dancing
5:30-6:30-Deli $2.50
H IL LEL,
1429 HILL ST.

U

ann arbor in
INVITES YOU TO ENJOY THEIR ALL NEW
RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

"I'D LIKE TO make some-
thing clear," said Goodman af-
ter she had learned -of the suit.
"When the Alternative Funding
Commission gave its report it
said it believed voluntary fund-
ing was wrong, that it was prob-
ably unconstitutional - but be-
cause it was the will of the
students it should be recom-
mended.
"And even though I believe
voluntary funding will destroy
MSA, I've worked for it because
the students voted for it," she
added.

I

I_

-----

ENJ

nV. *LIVE ENTERTAINMENT MON. THRU SAT.
U I. * DANCING HIGH ABOVE THE CITY
- GENEROUS COCKTAILS
PANORAMIC VIEW OF U OF M CAMPUS
yCASUAL DINING
j FEATURING FRESH SEAFOOD & SALAD BAR
" all at moderat prices " no cover charge
100 S. FOURTH AVE., ANN ARBOR

J

PRESENTS
A JANUARY
SPECTACULAR!
(Sale ends January 31)

Cf;ZAICS.

AM/F
-_-_-_-CASSE
!II PUSH
Model 3516-In Dash
AM/FM STEREO CASSETTE
WITH PRESET PUSH BUTTONS
AUTO EJECT 0 LOCK IN
FAST FORWARD 0 WEATHER BAND
Model 3515-Under Dash
CASSETTE WITH LOCK IN FAST
FORWARD " AUTO EJECT
Model 9230 A-Power Booster
INCREASES THE POWER OF ANY UNIT
TO 12 W RMS PER CHANNEL

FM STEREO
ETTE WITH
IBUTTONS
List $199.95
NOW
$169.95
List $59.95
NOW
$49.95
List $59.95
NOW
$39.95

Your Unit Will Sound
Great with a Pair of
CRAIG Speakers

The great Sound
of CRAIG Car Stereo
IN-DASH!

IN-DASH STEREO-MATRIX
AM/FM/WB 8-TRACK PLAYER

DELONG'S BAR-B-Q-PIT
314 DETROIT ST.
RIBS (Our Specialty), SHRIMP, SEAFOOD
CHICKEN-Bar-B-Q and Fried
All Dinners include Fries, Slaw & Bread
Pickups Mon., We
665-226 Tb., Sun. 1

MODEL 9240
MODEL 9427
WAS $39.95

$2995
WAS $49.95

$12995
was
$154.95

MODEL 3510A

F
n.

d.,
1-2

Delivery

Fri., Sat. 11-3

a A1

$995
was $89.95
MODEL 9432
1 --1

In-Dash S t e r e o Cassette
player with high sensitivity
AM/FM Stereo Radio, Auto-
matic FM Stereo switchinq.
$7995-
was
$94.95 MODEL 3517
Under - Dash Cassette with
FM. Has Fast Forward, Tone
Control, Slim Design.
....i 15995
was

" In-Dash Stereo-Matrix AM/FM/WB
8-Track Player
" Five-Button Preset Tuning plus Weather
Pushbutton
i Matrix, Repeat and Eject Pushbuttons
! Compatible with Existing Customized
Mounting Kits
* Stereo-Matrix Output for Four Speakers
MODEL 3149
NOW $9995
WAS $189.95

RAVEL MICH. UNION 763-21
SKI PARK CITY, UTAH

$1 995
was $29.95

MODEL 9414

MODEL 3514

$189.95

In-Dash AM/FM Stereo Cas-
sette which has Fast For-
ward, 4-way speaker fader,
5-station push button, has
matrix.

ANTd ENTEDTAIMMENT CENTER

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan