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January 28, 1976 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1976-01-28

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Wednesdey, Jonuory 28, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Thee ..

Wedn~sdoy, January 28, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

ews Bries
From Wire Service Reports
Detroit busing
Court-ordered integration of Detroit's schools, begun
peacefully with the busing of elementary school children,
broadened yesterday as classes resumed in the city's sec-
ondary schools.
School officials said the first day of court-ordered bus-
ing in Detroit was a success Monday, even though nearly
one-third of the pupils stayed home.
Detroit is the largest city in the country to undergo
court ordered desegregation, with about 10 per cent of the
247,000 pupils to be bused under the plan. The school system
is 75 per cent black.
Many buses were only half-full as they arrived at ele-
mentary schools Monday. More than 40,000 elementary
pupils were absent.
Supporters of the city's largest antibusing groups kept
their children home Monday in an indefinite 'yellow flu'
boycott. There were no incidents at the schools and only
three small demonstrations against the integration pro-
grams.
School Superintendent Arthur Jefferson estimated ab-
senteeism was 32.4 per cent of the city's 127,000 elementary

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 101
Wednesday, January 28, 1976
.s edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a iil y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.,
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
The population of New Jersey
has grown 3.4 per cent since
1970 to a total of 7,423,920
people in 1975, according to the
state Labor and Industry De-
partment.

F

UM STUDENT
BLOOD BANK

'I
III

L'Histoire du Soldat
FEBRUARY 6, 7, 8
TRUEBLOODAUDITORIUM
Tickets available through
UAC Ticket Central,
764-8350

Jan. 26,2,89, 30
UNION BALLROOM

11 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

ii

'r

MATHEMATICIANS
NSA Appreciates a Master's Degree

pupils, up from a normal rate of

12.5 per cent.

Postal Service woes
More money from taxpayers in the form of bigger Con-
gressional subsidies isthe only alternative to additional in-
creases in postal rates, Postmaster General Benjamin Bail-
ar said today.
"Unless increased public funding enables us in the near
term to slacken the pace of rate increases we may be
caught in a vicious cycle of rate increases to compensate
for volume decreases brought on in turn by rate increases,"
Bailar said.
"The types of problems we have faced are not going to
disappear. Inflation, rising costs and decreasing volume
are likely to be with us for the foreseeable future," Bailar
told the Senate Post Office Committee.
Bailar said he opposed allowing private companies to
compete against the Postal Service on delivering first class
mail, a suggestion made recently by the President's Coun-
cil on Wage and Price Stability.
He said private companies could charge lower prices
than -the Postal Service in delivering to high population
density areas, leaving the Postal Service with more costly
delivery areas. He said the Postal Service would have to
adopt variable mail rates to compete against private com-
petition.
Marijuana vs. alcohol
Marijuana did not have the socially disruptive effects
that alcohol use did in a group of adolescent delinquent
boys, Stanford University researchers reported yesterday.
Despite the fact that the two drugs were used with
about the same frequency, alcohol use was greater in
fights, difficulties with police and other authorities, trouble
with family or friends and automobile accidents.
Marjuana was used by the youths for tranquilizing pur-
poses to avoid difficulties and described by the youths as
reducing "assaultiveness," while alcohol was used de-
liberately to "bolster courage."
"Thus, on a variety of measures designed to identify
drug effects on assaultive behavior, the findings of this
study were consistent - cannabis marijuana usually re-
duced assaultiveness, and alcohol often enhanced assaul-
tiveness," the researchers said.
CIA investigations
Former CIA Director Richard Helms said yesterday
that any new congressional com~mittee set up to monitor
intelligence agencies should be briefed on covert opera-
tions before they are undertaken.
Helms, currently under investigation by the Justice
Department for his role in past Central Intelligence Agency
misdeeds, also told the Senate Government Operations
Committee he never felt himself to be above the law.
But he said that "some of the cases where I got in
difficulty" involved conflicting laws. He cited a provision
in the 1947 National Security Act charging the director to
protect intelligence sources and methods.
One of the accusations being investigated by the Jus-
tice Department involves, Helms' alleged approval of a
1971 break-in at the offices of a former CIA employe sus-
pected of a security violation.
"If there's going to be an oversight committee, I think
it ought to be in on the take-off," Helms told the commit-
tee, which is considering legislation that would create a
new +panel to monitor the intelligence community.

Let's be honest with each other: A
master's degree in math has not
been opening as many career doors
as it once did. That's why, if you
are receiving your MS between now
and September, you cannot
overlook the unique and
challenging math applications that
can still be found at the National
Security Agency today.
Specific assignments for
mathematicians at NSA fall into
three broad areas: consulting with
analysts on current communica-
tions problems; providing technical
assistance to the communications
systems specialists; and
conducting long-range
mathematical research in
communications arid computing.
Work with analytic personnel_
involves the statistical analysis of
data for causal significance.
Probability theory, statistical
design of experiments, and Fourier
analysis are employed frequently.
Communications systems of the
United States Government require
research and application of
statistics, modern algebra, and
information theory. Among the
more important mathematical tools
being used are: group theory,
Galois theory, matrix theory and
stochastic processes.
A research mathematician may
investigate the use of existing
computer systems or the design
of new systems to assist in the
solution of long-range communica-
tions problems.

As a junior mathematician, you will
progress through a three year
sequence of job assignments and
courses which are carefully
tailored to enhance your strength
in algebraic modeling, statistical
modeling, and analysis. Upon
successful completion of the
program;you should have a
comprehensive know.ledge of
NSA's technical problems and the
mathematically oriented
approaches to their solution.
Salaries begin at the GS-9 level
and are supplemented by the usual
government benefits. NSA offices
are located in the suburban
corridor between Washington, D.C.
and Baltimore, Maryland. U.S.
citizenship required.
Intrigued? Good! In fact, we hope
that you are sufficiently intrigued
to desire more information about
NSA career prospects. Make an
appointment through your campus
placement office to see our
representativewhen he visits your
school in the near future. If you
miss our recruiter, send a resume
to Chief, College Relations Branch,
National Security Agency, Fort
George G. Meade, Maryland 20755.
Attn: M321.

For
F' VALENTINE'S
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U. S. A. At
LOW
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ORDER BLANK
Mail this order to:
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CODE
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N-1 Dozen Carnations $8.00
0.2 Fresh Orchid Corsage $7.00
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ShipeFlowers to:
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---- MESSAGE

i

AP Photo
Brave new world
Two elementary students peer over the open window of a
school bus in Detroit Monday morning as court-ordered de-
segregation began. There were no incidents at the school with
some 15,000 elementary school students being bused. (See
News Briefs)

I

An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F

National
Security
Agency

classroom instruction in
electronic music
the usic
studio
If you want to create electronic music, our
1 2-week course is meant for you. Learn how to
use a synthesizer, operate tape recorders and
m i x e r s professionally, choose equipment
appropriate to your needs, and much more.
Classes are small and individual attention is
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555 e. william

994-5404

Separate classes begin on January 28 and 31

Daily Official Bulletin
Wednesday, January 28
Day Calendar
WUOM: Nat'l Town Meeting -
pan*el dscusion, "The Limits of
Government," 10:30 am.
CRLEES: 'Brown bag lunch- Jo-
seph Brodsky, poet-in-residence,
"Two Poems by Robert Frost," Com-
mons Em., Lane Hall, noon.
Women's Commission: 'The Se-
curity Issue," 2724 Furstenberg
Ctr., noon.
Physics: Marc Ross, "Low Energy
Consumption: Technology and Life-
style," P&A Colloq. Em., 4 pm.
Statistics: Edward Rothman,
"Evolution and Fine-grained En-
vironnental Runs (A Decision The-I
ory Problem?)" 3227 Angell Hall, 4
pm.
Industrial, Operations Eng.: Don-
ald F. Huelke, "The Federal Motor
vehicle Safety Standards; Recom-
mendations for Increased Occupant
Safety," 229 W. Eng., 4 pm.
Biological Sciences: Vincent Mae-
sey, "Role of Covaent Intermediates
In Flavoprotein Catalyses," Lee.
Rm., 1, MtB, a pm.
Residential College Series: Bert
Hornblack, "The Function of the
Imagination: An Argument About,
Creation, Value, and Meaning,"
Greene Lounge, E. Quad, 7 pm.
Urban Planning Student Caucus:
Kent, Mathewson, David Cason,~
"Regionalism & Southeast Michi-
gan: A Historical Perspective," N.'
Cmpusc cholmax
Music School: Max Lifchitz, pia-
nist, works by U-M composers, Re-
cital Hall, 8 pm.
UTP: Orten's Loot, Arena Thea-I

Explore the best.
While others are
conforming to tradition,
we.re forming our own.
Rush PHI GAMMA DELTA
JANUARY 25-30

VAN GOGH NORMAN ROCKWELL SURREALISM
p DUCHAMP MOUNTAINS OF AMERICA -HIMALAYAS
CEZANNE REMBRANDT TOLOUSE-LAUTREC '
+ CENTICORE BOOKSHOP IS STARTING A NEW B A R G A I N POLICY THAT WILL OFFER HUN-
DREDS OF HARDCOVER TITLES REGULARLY AT DISCOUNTS OF 25%.
These books are not the usual remainders and publishers overstocks that are to be found on all the other tired
& --isal a-i-roundAnn- Arbor. These books are mostly new best sellers and have never been on sale before. The
selection will change every three or four days. The quantities will be limited. S t o p in often and see what
tremendous bargains you can pick up at any given moment at CENTICORE, 336 MAYNARD STREET
As an exam pie, last week we sold several hundred of th e following bargains:
REGULAR SeAiLRE
Ascent of Mn . . .. .. .. ... .. . .. .. . .. .. .. ...17.50 13.13
Sylvia Flith's Letters H ome. .. .. . ... . . .. ... .. 12.50 9.38
Bob and Ray Book.............6.95 5.21
sl Norman Rockwell (brand new by Abrams).a.. .n. ..n35.00 26.25
Age of Napoleon. . .c. .g. .e. .y. . . .. .T... . . . . . . . . .i17.50 13.13
Mevle "a Bigrpy................15.00 11.25
CookanexamplesCtaweekesolog..........15.95 11.95
Ampigoy oo.............. ... 15.00 11.25
Cetcr .' n
Aldous Huxley ........ ...... ...... ...... . .50 11.4
Man/Woman.............................24.95 14.96
All the Strange Hours, Loren Eisley............9.95 7.46
N ALLT THE GORGEOUS ABRAMS ART BOOKS IN THE
L STORE WILL BE ON SALE THIS WEEK ONLY!
.kM l i l , a B o r p y . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 0 1 2
Co k aao . . . . . . . . . . . 59 19

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