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November 22, 1975 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-11-22

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, November 22, 1975

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, November 22; 1975

APqMWSe.*s
mi. NewspW8
How would
You like
to sign
the work
you do.?
It's a shame that most of us
don't get to sign our work.
Because we'd probably do it
better. Just out of pride.
And that could mean better
products and services
for everybody. So, even if you
don't have to sign your work,
do the kind of work you'd
be. proud to put your name on.
America. It only works
as well as we do.

chupc/tw/ ZPck4p OIervice4

CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Pastor: Don Postema
Christian Reformed Worship.
Sunday Worship-10 a.m. and
6 p.m.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
State at Huron and Washington
Worship Services:
8:30 a.m. - Communion -
Chapel.
9:30 a.m.-Worship Service-
Sanctuary.
11:00 a.m.-Worship Service-
Sanctuary.
9:30 a.m.-Church School.
11:00 a.m.-Church School.
Sermon: 'Antidote for An-
xiety," by Donald B. Strobe.
Worship Services are broad-

cast over WNRS-AM (1290) each
Sunday from 11:00-12:00.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
I CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw-662-4466
Worship - Sunday, 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.
Holy Communion-Wednesday,
5:15-5:50 p.m.
Young Adult meals - Sunday,
12:30 p.m.; Wednesday, 6:00
p.m. ($1.00).
Study and discussion-
11:00 a.m. Sunday-Adult Bible
study.
8:00-9:00 p.m. Monday-semi-
nar on Dietrich Bonhoeffer's
"The Cost of Discipleship."
12:00-1:00 Thursday - Thurs-
day Forum (includes lunch, $1).

Chancel C h o i r - 7:00-8:30
Thursday.
For other information on the
Young Adult Program call the
Rev. Peter C. Budde or Jo Ann
Staebler, 662-4466.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 N. Division
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.
f R
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
(Formerly Lutheran Student
sGordon Ward, Pastor
Chapel)
801 S. Forest Ave. at Hill St.
Sunday Service at 10:30 a.m.

BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149
Minister: Orval L. E. Willimann
9:00 a.m.-Chapel Service.
10:00 a.m.-Worship service.
10:00 a.m.-Church Sciool.
Child care at 10:00 a.m. serv-
ice.
Service broadcast on WNRS
(1290 AM).
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at3
YM-YWCA, 530 S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome.
For information or transpor-
t ation: 663-3233 or 662-2494.
10:00 a.m. - Sunday Worship
Service.

4

Sunday Morning Bible S:udy
at 9:15 a.m.j
Midweek Worship Wednesday,
at 10:00 p.m.
ANN ARBOR CHURCH
OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west of
U of M Stadium)
Bible Study - Sunday, 9:301
a.m.-Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 s m.
and 6:00 p.m.
Need Transportation? C a 1l1
662-9928.

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL
CHURCH, 306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
10:00 a.m. - Morning Prayer
and Sermon.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers
9:30 a.m.-Church School.
5:30 p.m.-Student Supper.
10:30 a.m.-Morning Worship.
* * *

* * * FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL SCIENTIST
(Catholic) . 1833 Washtenaw
331 Thompson-663-0557 Sunday Service and Sunday
Weekend Masses: School-10:30 a.m.
Saturday-5 p.m., 11:30 p.m. Wednesday Testimony Meet-
Sunday - 7:45 a~m., 9 a. , ing-8:00 p.m.
10:30 a.m., noon, and 5 p.m. Child Care-Sunday, under 2
(plus 9:30 a.m. North Campus). years; Wednesday, through 6
* * * years.
CANTERBURY HOUSE Midweek Informal Worship.
(Episcopal) Reading Room-306 E. Lib-
218 N. Division-665-0606 erty, 10-6 Monday and Friday;
Sundays at noon--Holy Eucha- 10-5 all other days; closed Sun-
rist with a meal following. days.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN"
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave. 663-5560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Morning Worship
9:15 and 10:30 a.m.

at

!M ta.rrMn r ce wraKMw as /k irhv. WMMrmai O t.

L A

......................
-..-...

ADVERTISEMENT

The Real.
Seafood Co.
OPEN DAILY
341 S. Main St.
Cottage INN
(The oldest pizzeria in Ann Arbor)I
SERVING ITALIAN FOOD
OPEN 11 A.M.-1 A.M.

0
It

I

9

N

bol

A Weekly Guide to

Good

Eating . . .

O9

B b

p-.
I~I

SERVING LUNCHES AND DINNERS
Mon.-Sat.: 11:00 a.m.-2:00 a.m.; Sun.: 12 noon-2:00 a.m.
Kitchen Open until 1 a.m. Cocktails until 2 a.m.
208 W. HURON NEAR MAIN
ANN ARBOR 995-0505

AT THE
YOU WILL FIND
Good Food at reason-
able prices. Lunches or
dinners p l u s cocktail y
hour 4-8 p.m.
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
FOR YOUR LISTENING
AND DANCING PLEASURE ^
SPECIAL EVERY
THURSDAY NITE:
Greek Food,
Music and Dancing
HOURS: M-F 11-2 a.m.; ;
Sat. & Sun. 5-2 a.m.

earth eno
Highlights from our
fine Greek menu:
GYROS .....$1.45
SHISH-KA-BOB .. 1.40
MAUSAKA .........1.75
PASTITSIO...-...1.75
DOLMADES.........1.75
SPINACH PIE.. 1.75
GYROS PLATE ......2.25
COMBINATION
PLATE ...... .... 3.65
HOURS:
Mon.-Sat. 11-12 midnight
Sun. 12-12 midnight
football weekends (Fri.-Sat.)
11 - 3A.M.
226 S. MAIN
994-1012

COTTAGE INN
Thirty five years ago, Ann Arbor was just another sleepy
college town. And it was then that the Cottage Inn opened
its doors to the campus community as a soda fountain and
pizza parlor. But Ann Arbor has grown since then and chang-
ing times and tastes have spelled the demise of those estab-
lishments that have not evolved with the community.
But the Cottage Inn is more alive now than ever. Its name
has become established here and now it can proudly boast
to be the oldest pizzeria in Ann Arbor. Its simple secret to
longevity is the high quality food it offers at very affordable
prices, and its new casual and homey decor is only one more
demonstration of its ability to move with the times in Ann
Arbor.
The main feature there is the Italian food. There is the
famous Cottage Inn pizza, of course, complete with a full
range of items. But the Cottage Inn also offers a complete
range of sophisticated Italian cuisine. The spaghetti, mos-
taccioli, and seashells come with a choice of meat, mushroom
sauce with meatballs, or Italian sausage.
Or if you have an apetite for something a little more
exotic, $3.75 will net 'you Veal Barbazon, Veal and peppers,
Veal Francaise (all with a side of Cottage Inn's special spa-
ghetti), or baked lasagna and chicken cacciatore. All the
Italian dinners are served with tossed salad or cole slaw and
fresh Vienna bread with a crock of whipped, pure creamery
butter.
But the fare at the Cottage Inn is not exclusively Italian.
Other dinners include an all beef shish-ke-bob for $3.25, one-
half a fried spring chicken, or barbeque chicken for $2.95,
shrimp, fried fillet of sole, or a 10 ounce club steak.
There are also those specialties designed specifically with
the luncheon crowd in mind. The three egg omlettes at $1.90
are a meal in themselves. And western omlettes complete
with all the fixin's are $2.45. The third-of-a-pound hamburgers
are also popular items. Have one plain or with your choice of
bacon, cheese, mushrooms, crumbled blue cheese or cheddar
cheese. If you suffer from indecision, order the Cottage Inn
Burger (C.I.B.) and get a smattering of all the items for $1.75.
Take your choices from the sandwich board on either
white or rye bread. Have a steak sandwich, ham and cheese,
bacon, lettuce and tomato, a meat ball sandwich, a fried fish
sndwich, sub, or Italian sausage sandwich with red sauce.
Suit yourself.
For dessert, order rice pudding, ice cream with or without
chocolate sauce, or treat yourself to something really special-
cheesecake which is worth all of its 85c.
Exotic eating does not stop with dessert. Cottage Inn fea-
tures capuccino, rich fresh coffee topped with a dab of whip-
ped cream, and expresso made in a special expresso machine
hand made in Italy. If you have some time in the afternoon
or evening but don't feel like having a meal, just stop in to
tip a cup of this very special coffee.
The decor makes the meal more than just a means to
fill your stomach. Styled in a rustic pub, it is complete with
kegs, intimate lighting, and a cozy fireplace. Coupled with the
friendly and efficient service, the eating experience is com-
plete.
The Cottage Inn will soon add another feature, alcoholic
beverages. It's just another addition to better serve you and
suit your tastes.
It is conveniently located at 512 East William Street-just
a block from campus. Stop in anytime between 11 and 1 a.m.
for either lunch or dinner-or just some relaxation. Just a few
words of caution, though. You may never want to leave.

The Real
Seafood-
Company
To the list of the finest restaurants of Ann Arbor add the
name of the newcomer, The Real Seafood Co. Offering in-
expensive, elegant dining, it fills a gap that has existed in
the city for some time now.
The Real Seafood Co. has a huge dose of what every fine
restaurant should have-excellent food, friendly efficient
service, and a comfortable warm atmosphere; But they have
more-that extra something which makes a restaurant special.
Maybe it's because it's as cozy as your own dining room,
maybe it's because the waiters and waitresses so obviously
enjoy their jobs, maybe it's because the restaurant is so
spacious it gives the feeling of privacy. But whatever the
reason, Dennis Serras, the owner and manager of The Real
Seafood Co., is very good at what he does. His restaurant is
a great place to dine.
It's inexpensive, elegant dining. Where else can you get
a fresh, whole dungeness crab, sweet corn on the cob, and
crisp cole slaw for $6.25? And the hot fudge sundaes would
put any other to shame.
But then Dennis Serras has a whole philosophy about run-
ning a restaurant. He believes that the people who run the
place are what make it good or bad. He's employee con-
scious, and he knows that if his employees are unhappy in
their work, his customers will not enjoy their meal. So he
makes sure his customers are happy.
He also knows how to maintain quality food while keeping
the prices down, and part of that talent is serving a few,
very excellent recipes as specials. One of these is Paella, a
traditional Spanish peasant seafood dish. It's served in its
own casserole dish with rice, vegetables, mussels, lobster,
fish, chicken and spices. Truly a taste treat.
And it's such a pleasure to dine in a casual, but beautiful
room. It's a seafood restaurant, and the furnishings are ocean
oriented. An authentic fishing dory hangs from the center of
the ceiling. Dennis Serras looked all over the east coast for
the boat, but found it in a northern Michigan lake.
Old style paintings of clipper ships and whale hunters
hang on the walls, and detailed sail boat models stand next to
several tables.
But the decor is not over done. It gives an impression of
rich tradition rather than posh antiqueness.
Ann Arbor has finally done it, attracted a restaurant that
serves the community perfectly. Real Seafood Co. is as solid,
casual and up front as its name, and is everything that any-
one could ask for.

The varied menu of the Real Seafood Co. makes deciding
what to order a tough decision for many. Models of sail-
ing vessels from the past divide the parallel rows of
booths in the middle of the dining room.

Heidelberg
215 N. MAIN s 663-7758
DINING: Complete German a n d AmericanI
menu 11 a.m.-1 :30 a.m. SaladsI
DANCING: German Bands on Saturday nights
BANQUET FACILITIES
RATHSKELLER:. Folk music sing-along Fri. &
Sat. nights
(NO COVER)
OYSTER BAR &
THE SPAGHETTI MACHINE
301 W. HURON 663-2403
SALAD BAR 13 TYPES OF SPAGHETTI
GREEN & WHOLE WHEAT NOODLES OYSTERS, CLAMS,
SHRIMP, SOALLOPS, LOBSTER, RAINBOW TROUT-
VEAL. BEEF TOURNADOES OSOBUCO
COCKTAILS-WINE
AN UNUSUAL CONCEPT OF P U B L I C DINING
WHERE EVERYTHING HAPPENS IN FRONT OF
YOUR EYES-WITH FRESH INGREDIENTS ONLY.
AT EXTREMELY MODERATE PRICES
DANCING FRIDAY & SATURDAY With

This huge machine produces Espresso that is traditionally
drunk from a demci-tasse (small cup). Taste a bit of
Mediterranean living with this unforgettable beverage
from the Cottage Inn.

- % n e2 , . 5.. . '.i ..T xt.."G~ :w ''_ 4 . .

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