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November 11, 1975 - Image 8

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Michigan Daily, 1975-11-11

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90 zight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY"

Tuesday, November 11, 1I.?5 .I

age Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, November 11, 197~

TODAY IN SPORTS

Bowl

picture

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Spectators
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narrowing

By JEFF SCHILLER
and RAY O'HARA
As the 1975 football season grinds toward its finish, specula-
n over this year's major bowl teams is livelier than it has
en in years. The new policy of both the Big Ten and the Pacific
ight Conferences which allows teams other than their cham-
onship teams to go to bowl games has made the usual guessing
me even tougher this season.
There are commonly thought to be four prestigious bowls.
e Rose Bowl, Orange Bowl, Cotton Bowl and Sugar Bowl are
nsidered to be at least one cut above the others and teams
nerally covet an invitation to any of them.
Such an honor can, of course, fall on only eight teams each
ar and therein lies the proverbial 'rub.'
The Rose Bowl is the biggest, richest and most popular bowl
me of all. Every year the champions of both the Big Ten and
e Pacific Eight play each other in Pasadena on New Year's
ay. That particular pairing is no accident. Both conferences
ave signed a contract with the Tournament of Roses which
omises to send the championship teams to that bowl in return
r some juicy financial rewards which fall on both conferences
llectively.
The contract idea is an appealing one to a bowl.because
it can save a lot of effort trying to recruit teams. The Cotton
Bowl was begun by the Southwest Conference (Texas, Texas
A&M, Arkansas, et. al.) and the champion of that conference
automatically attends it.
Jumping on the bandwagon, the Orange Bowl has signed the
ig Eight (the Oklahoma-Nebraska-Missouri crowd) champion to
contract binding through 1978. Thus four teams, the winner of
te Michigan-OSU game, the winner of the Oklahoma-Nebraska
sme, the winner of the Texas-Texas A&M fame and the Pac-8
ampion (Cal, UCLA or Stanford) are assured of appearances
t previously determined bowls.
It so happens that November 22 is the date of three of the
lost important games. Oklahoma-Nebraska, Michigan-OSU and
al-Stanford are all that day. The Orange;Cotton and Sugar bowls
ill all issue their invitations after that weekend. Significantly,

they will not wait for the Texas-Texas A&M and USC-UCLA
games, which are both November 28.
As it stands now, the following represents the best guesses
of Orange Bowl chairmen Ben Benjamin and Don Crain nd
Cotton Bowl leaders Field and John Scovall as to the bowl lineup
of the four 'majors.'
ORANGE BOWL: The winner of Nebraska-Oklahoma will
probably play the Big Ten runnerup. Though Benjamin refused
flatly to commit himself, he did say that there were only a few
teams in the country who he thought could play with the Big
Eight powers. Both Michigan and Ohio State were among them,
he added right before leaving to join Big Ten Commissioner
Wayne Duke in a local bar. As to whether either Big Ten team
would choose the Orange Bowl over the others, the placement of
an Orange Bowl sticker on Don Canham's lapel at the press
smoker Friday night appears significant indeed.
SUGAR BOWL: Everyone was in general agreement that
Alabama will probably be one of the contestants here. The other
could come from Penn State, Florida, Notre Dame, or Oklahoma.
If Oklahoma is available, they will definitely come here because
the Cotton Bowl, afraid of an Oklahoma-Texas rematch doesn't
want the Sooners. Nebraska would probably pass up the Sugar,
if available, to play Texas or Texas A&M in the Cotton Bowl.
COTTON BOWL: The winner of Texas vs. Texas A&M
(Arkansas still has a chance but it's a slim one) will play host
probably to Nebraska, Notre Dame, or Penn State. The Scovalls
were very impressed with Penn State, though last Saturday's
loss to North Carolina State might have changed their thinking.
Arizona State (currently number 8) is not in contention for any
of the at-large berths because of the commitment of the WAC
winner to the Fiesta Bowl.
ROSE BOWL: Very simple and straightforward-The winner
of Michigan vs. Ohio State against the PAC-8 champ (UCLA, Cal,
or Stanford).
Our predictions: Oklahoma vs. Alabama in the Sugar Bowl;
Texas vs. Penn State in the Cotton Bowl; Nebraska vs. Ohio State
(no, not just sentiment) in the Orange Bowl; and Michigan vs.
California (Schiller) or UCLA (O'Hara) in Pasadena.

Daily Photo by SCOTT ECCKER t
One of the unsung heroes of the Michigan offense is guard
Walt Downing, a sophomore from Coatesville, Pennsylvania.
Here "Big Walt" puts the crunch on a Purdue defender to 1
open up holes for the Michigan runners.
EMU, WMU

!'iI

STEVE'S LUNCH
1313 SO. UNIVERSITY
HOME COOKING IS OUR SPECIALTY

BLUE BEATS

Synchronized swimmers prevail

Breakfast All Day
3 Eggs, Hash Browns,
Toast & Jelly-$1.15
Ham or Bacon or
Sausage with 3 Eggs,
Hash Browns, Toast &
jelly--$1.75
3 eggs, Rib Eye Steak,
Hash Browns,
Toast & JeI1y-$2.10
FAST AND FRIENDLY SERVICE
BY MR. AND MRS. LEE

EVERYDAY SPECIALS
Beef Stroqanoff
Chinese Pepper Steak
Eq Rolls
Home-made Soups, Beef,
Barley, Clam Chowder, etc.
Home-made Chili
Veqetable Tempuro -
(served after 2 D.m.)
Hamburqer Steak Dinner -
(1/2lb.) .........$1.99
Spaqhetti in Wine Sauce
Beef Curry Rice
Baked Flounder Dinner
1/ lb. Roast Beef Kaiser Roll
Delicious Korean Bar-b-a Beef
(served after 4 daily)
Fried Bean Sprouts
Kim-Che

By PEGGY GIRSHMAN
In their first meet of the
season, the Michigan Synchron-
ized swim team topped both
Eastern Michigan University
(71-33) and Western Michigan
University (59-45).
The meet, a triple dual pro-
pulsion meet, tested the abili-
ties of the swimmers to race
while sculling and performing
single and double ballet legs
(legs raised in their air while
moving the body with the
hands).
This is the first year the team
has been separated from "Mich-
ifish," the synchronized swim-
ming club that puts on a water
ballet show each spring.
"WE WORKED real hard and
it showed," said Coach Joyce
Lindeman, adding, "I was very

pleased with the team."
Putting in exceptional per-
formances, according to Coach
Lindeman, were Helen Hene-
veld, who took three - first
places, freshman Sue Neu, who
placed first and second in her
events, and Diane Urban, who
captured a first and a third
place.
In addition to propulsion
meets, the team will also com-
pete in figure and routine
meets. Figure meets require
compulsory figures, judged on
execution and difficulty. The
judges grade each figure on a
one to ten scale.
Routine meets are the most
complex. Here, the team de-
viqes solo, duet, trio or group
"numbers," which combine the
figure moves with costumes,
SWCHA Standings

lighting, and music. Routine!team travels to an Ohio State
competition will not start until invitational meet. Other schools
the winter semester, although competing will probably be
Coach Lindeman says that the Western Illinois, which gives
team will start to work on rou- synchro scholarships, and Uni-
tines next week. versity of Wisconsin.
THE SWIMMERS are placed. "OHIO STATE and Western

Rebuilt offensive line
Good, getting better
THE SILENT Majority. Politicians depend on it. So do offenses.
That silent majority of seven men that play on the offensive
line.
Who ever talks about the offensive line? Who keeps blocking
statistics - most blocks in a season, most yards blocking, blocks
for losses. Since when have you seen a headline like "Joe Shmoe
blocks P.U. to 48-2 victory."
Anonymity is the fate of offensive linemen.
At Michigan the situation is compounded because the line is
entirely composed of players who were not starting last fall.
Guard Kirk Lewis, tackle Steve King, starters last fall,
and tight end George Przygodski, and split end Rick White
were all expected _to start this season.
Lewis broke his arm a week before the Wisconsin game and
was out for the season. King injured his knee and only recently
began playing again. Przygodski has seen very little playing time
this fall and may not see any more unless he can come back
from a serious knee injury. White started in the Wisconsin game,
injured his knee, reinjured it again in practice and is out for the
season.
Only center Jim Czirr, tackle Bill Dufek, and guard Mark
Donahue remain from the pre-season starting line and none of
these three started for Michigan's 1974 Big Ten Championship
team.
Michigan's line situation was made more desperate when
guard Greg Bartnick was injured and out for the season and
tackle Jim Hall was stricken with appendicitis. Both were poten-
tial starters.
So Schembechler has put together a line of inexperienced
second-stringers.
Not a very good line you might guess.
You might guess wrong because the Wolverine offensive
line has given Michigan 3203 yards rushing more rushing
yards than any team in the nation. Averaging 355.9 yards per
game on the ground Michigan is one of three teams to have
surpassed 3,000 yards rushing.
For the first time in Michigan history, thanks to the ef-
forts of the line, two Wolverine backs could break 1000 yards in
one season. Gordon Bell has already gained 1114 yards while
fullback Rob Lytle needs just 149 to make 1000.
So who are these guys?
One of them is Keith Johnson, senior split end who backed
up Jim Smith at that position last fall. He was expected to play
defensive back this fall but was moved back to split end after
the injury to Rick White. Split ends aren't usually counted on to
do too much blocking but Johnson proved he could do it when
he had to Saturday. A shattering cross-body leveled two Purdue
defenders pursuing Jim Smith on his way to an 83-yard touch-
down.
Another is quick tackle Mike Ken who played part of
last spring at tight end. The sophomore took over the tackh
spot when Hall and King were sidelined and has maintained
a starter's role even though both Hall and King have returned
to action.
Mark Donahue and Walt Downing, two more sophomores have
played excellently at guard. This duo along with tackle Bill Du-
fek compose the three 'D's on offense. Before the careers of
these three sophomores at Michigan are over the names of Down-
ing, Donahue and Dufek may be household words.
Guard Les Miles, second or third string in the spring, has
also seen plenty of action filling in for injured linemen and has
performed well.
A household word already, at least around St. Joseph, Michi-
gan, is the name of Jim Czirr. The 6-3, 230-pound center has his
very own fan club. Friends and relatives from his home town
purchased an old city bus to make the trip to every Michigan
home game. Anyone is welcome to join the club and make the
trip and everyone in the club is encouraged to wear a number
52 'T' shirt.
Bo Schembechler says of Czirr, "Right now he's as good
as any center in the conference and I would rank him right
in there with some of the great centers we've had here in the
past few years . . . like Dennis Franks, Guy Murdock and
Bill Hart."
Czirr was selected by the coaching staff as this week's of-
fensive hustler.
The tight end position has been shared by two freshmen,
Mark Schmerae and Gene Johnson. Johnson was a receiver for
qiartrback Rick Leach at Flint Southwestern.
"I think they've done a great job so far" said Schembechler
of the line. With experience gained each game and the return
of King and Hall the blocking should keep improving.
With improvement maybe the namelessness of the blocking
corps will vanish. Jim Czirr for Heisman?
- _ t

+&AUiftV._

w

into three categories: novice,
junior, and senior. Placing first
in novice moves the swimmer
to the junior category, and ex-
ceptional junior performances
will place the swimmer in the
senior category.
"For the first time, our senior
category will be able to hold a
candle to the other schools,"
C o a c h Lindeman explained.
"Until this year, we were
strong in novice and in junior,
but we couldn't place as well
because we didn't have senior
talent."
Next Saturday, the synchro.

Illinois will probably beat us
because they have top swim-
mers from the AAU," Lindeman
said. "But we also have Sue
Neu and Michele Pingel, fresh-
men whose home teams placed
high in national competition."
Lindeman does not regret that
she could not offer scholarships
to attract other top swimmers.
"We have one of the better
programs," she declared. "It
costs too much money and time
to play the recruiting game. I'm

--I ~ U -

}I-

MONDAY - SATURDAY 8 - 8
SUNDAY 10 - 8
769-2288
1313 South University

pleased with the
we're all looking
good season."

team and
ahead to a

The Top Twenty

WCHA
Standings
W L TPts
Michigan State 4 0 0 8
MICHIGAN 2 0 0 4
Minnesota 2 0 0 4
Minn-Duluth 2 2 0 4
Michigan Tech 2 2 0 4
Notre Dame 2 2 0 4
Denver 2 2 0 4
North Dakota 1 3 0 2
Wisconsin 0 2 0 0
Colorado Coil. 0 2 0 0

All
Games
W L T
5 10
3 1 0
3 2 0
2 2 0
2 4 0
2 4 0
2 2 0

By The Associated Press

9. Notre Dame

1. Ohio St. (49) 9-0-0 1,138
2. Nebraska (8) 9-0-0 1,054
3. Texas A&M (1) 8-0-0 875
4. MICHIGAN 7-0-2 721
5. Alabama 8-1-0 687
6. Oklahoma 8-1-0 621
7. Texas 8-1-0 605
8. Arizona State 9-0 59

10. Colorados
Tie Daily Libels
11. Penn St.
12. Arizona
13. S. California
14. Florida
15. California
16. Miami, 0.
17. Kansas
18. Missouri
19. UCLA
20. Georgia

7-2-0
7-2-0
9-0-0
8-2-0
7-1-0
7-2-0
7-2-0
6-3-0
8-1-0
6-3-0
6-3-0
6-2-1
7-2-0

252
223
223
214
206
186
111
107
88
56
53
50
47

oucr99s ~
Presents:
TWO HAPPY HOURS
Dance and Drink to the Live
Music of BRAINSTORM.
All BEER and MIXED DRINKS 1/2 PRICE
9 p.m.-10 p.m. and 10p.m.-11 p.m.
50c Discount on Admission, With Student I.D.
516 E. LIBERTY 994-5750

By United Press International
1. Ohio State 9-0 (39) 473
2. Nebraska 9-0 (3) 373
3. Texas A&M 8-0 303
4. MICHIGAN 7-0-2 271
5. Alabama 8-1 269
6. Texas 8-1 214
7. Oklahoma 8-1 178
8. Arizona State 9-0 50
9. Notre Dame 7-2 33
10. Penn State 8-2 29
11. Arizona 7-1 25
12. Colorado 7-2 24
13. California 6-3 15
14. UCLA 6-2-1 12
15. Florida 7-2 11
16. Missouri 6-3 9
17. Tie: Southern California 7-2 6
Arkansas 6-2
19. Tie: Kansas 6-3 5
Georgia 7-2

I

FA

MUN ,

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 18

SUSAN HAYWARD in 1958
I WANT TO LIVE
Susan Hayward received an Academy Award
for her performance in this true story of a
young, unwed mother convicted of murder,
executed and then posthumously exonerated
in a newspaper series. An excellent example of
film reportage with much of the dialogue taken
directly from official records.
WED.: Sam Peckinpath's RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY
CIEMAGLDTONIGHT AT OLD ARCH.
7:00 & 9:05 Adm. $1.25

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316 S. STATE-994-4041
Open Mon. -Fri. 10-8,
Sat. 10-6
WEST SIDE
BOOK SHOP
FINE USED and RARE BOOKS
at REASONABLE PRICES
LIBRARIES PURCHASED
113 W. Liberty
Mon.-Sat.: 11:00-6:00
Thurs. and Fri. Nites to 9:00
995-1891

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