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November 08, 1975 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-11-08

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.Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

$aturday, November 8, * 1975 1

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Soturday, November 8,1975

Big time TV comes
to city via channel 31

State, federal unemployment,
figures up .3 per cent in Oct.

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
HEW okays 'U' hiring plan

(Continued from Page 1)
Morningstar said Channel 31
plans to obtain its new program-
ming "wherever it's available,"
indicating England, Canada and
the United States as the most
viable sources.
HOWEVER, he said Channel
31 will only "buy the best."
The station also hopes to pro-
duce 40 per cent of its own
programming, according to
Morningstar, and to syndicate
to other stations.
Morningstar said the station
will emphasize public affairs
and sports programming, the
two types most preferred by
viewers in this area. Children's
and ethnic programming will
also be offered.
THE BROADCASTING firm is

recruiting a professional man-
agement staff from all parts of
the country to assist in the or-
ganization of the new station.
Channel 31's signal, aided by
two million watts of power, will
cover an east-west area from
Windsor, Ontario to Kalamazoo
and a north-south area from
Saginaw to Bowling Green,
Ohio.
Ann Arbor's last television
station, Channel 20, aired from
1954 to 1958.
Thomas Mott Osborne, as
waren of Sing Sing Prison in
New York State, initiated a
program of convict self-govern-
ment.
A solar cooker uses a concave
mirror to focus the sun's rays
on a single spot that can cook
food by the sun's heat.

(Continued from Page 1)
in September and 7.3 per cent,
or 288,700 jobless workers, in
October 1974.
AFL-CIO President George
Meany said the figures show
that "the twin evils of recession
and inflation are still plaguing
America."
MEANY SAID job-creating
legislation and other measures
the President either vetoed or
has threatened to veto are "es-
sential measures" for restoring
economic health. "No one can.
look at these figures with satis-
faction," Meany said. "No one
can pretend. that the recission
is over or that information."
This assessment was disputed
by Julius Shiskin, commissioner
of labor satistics, in testimony

1 IL (Continued from Page 1) # sideration to minorities and wo- , The department "does not
before the Joint Economic Com- the unemployment rate reached ment's memo, "Colleges and men alone." j require that job requirements
mittee of Congress. "Although its recession peak of 9.2 per universities are entitled to se- I be waived or lowered in order
miteelofCngess . Although Iitsce ssion eaky. 92 t er -lect the most qualified candi- HEW ALSO stressed that an to attract women and minority
developments in the over-all cent last May. Since then, und grad- date, without regard to race, . affirmative action plan should candidates. Indeed, it express-
September. and October appear ually as the nation began its sex or ethnicity, for any posi- not pull down hiring standards ly forbids differential standards
to be mixed, on balance the recovery from the recession, tion. The college or university, merely to meet the program's based on race, color, sex, re-
evidence shows that the eco- falling to 8.6 per cent in June not the federal government, is objectives. ligion or national origin."
nomic recovery continued in Oc- and dropping further to 8.4 per to say what constitutes qualifi
tober," he said. cent during the summer and cation for any particular posi-
I De-finally to 8.3 per cent in Septem- tion."
Initseortdthe Laboro ber. Also, the recruitment of wo- d e fin d s H ears
unemployed in October increas- Labor Department officials at- tutes a violation of HEW guide-g
ed by 230,000 to 8 million. The tributed most of the increased lines.
number of Americans with jobs jobless in October to persons Says the department, "A mae n tallcoeten t
stood at 85.4 million, about the reentering the labor force, ap- jor purpose of the affirmativeI a. y
same as m September. parently in the hope of finding action provision.. is to broad-
THE SIZE of the nation's ork as production in the na- en the pool of applicants so (Continued from Page1) i tal competency to stand trial."
T Sbrtion's factories picked up. that women and minorities will ''She's a cool customer," Mc-
about 250,000 to 93.4 million last be considered for employment Donald said. CARTER said Drs. Pollack,
abot. 20 tThe common crow lives over along with all other applicants. Ci Donald Lunde and Margaret
month. most of the United Statesand The affirmative action process CARTER said i his written nger all agreed that their
The increase in joblessness Canada. Crows often form large must not operate to restrict con- decision that Hearst had openly Sin ioal agreed ta ei
mustnotopeateto rstrct on-ex~aminations disclosed no evi-
last month was the first since flocks of several thousand birds. discussed the bank robberys
-- --f charges with the psychiatrists deuce of psychosis or other
I 7 _ylhiatrpsts serious mental disease or defect
~A±~iV htwol epiehrhfcm

k
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:,
'-
t

-ADVERTISEMENT--
Dinin O inAnn Arbo.

lirA) loses
minority
recruitment

wo examine ner. tawoldervhrofz -
He quoted one doctor as say- petency.
ing she "demonstrated full un-
derstanding of the significance He said Lunde found that
of the bank robbery charges if "Ms. Hearst is oriented to date,
she were convicted." place and person."
The same psychiatrist, Dr. The judge said he was not
Seymour Pollack, was quoted as ruling out the possibility that
saying the newspaper heiress Hearst needs psychiatric -ther-
_ IIL_ ~rs.t....,, :..tnt. i- U- t. - UaAf"e

4 w
AT THE
a r
YOU WILL FIND
G Good Food at reason-A
able prices. Lunches or
dinners p 1 u s cocktail
hour 4-8 p.m.
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
FOR YOUR LISTENING
AND DANCING PLEASURE 0
SPECIAL EVERY
THURSDAY NITE:"
Greek Food,
x Music and Dancing v
HOURS: M-F 11-2 a.m.;0
Sat. & Sun. 5-2 a.m.
Highlights from our
fine Greek menu:
GYROS.. E. . $1.43
SHISH-KA-BOB...1.40
MAUSAKA .........1.75
PASTITSIO.........1.75
DOLMADES.........1.75
SPINACH PIE .......1.75
GYROS PLATE......2.25
COMBINATION
PLATE...........3.65
HOURS.
Mon.-Sat. 11-12 midnight
Sun. 12-12 midnight
football weekends (Fri.-Sot.)
11 -3A.M.
226 S. MAIN
994-1012

A weekly guide to great eating
FEATURING THIS WEEK:

"1still has difficulty relating "the anv, bunt he said the deense
grievance emotionally disturbing events" already is permitted to provide
of her 19 months with the Sym- such aid to her in her jail cell.
bionese Liberation Army. But Her lawyers have repeatedly
(Continued from Page 1) even on this subject, Pollack contended that Hearst should be
affirmative action program for said she is "not fatally impaired transferred to a private psy-
GSAs does not deal with it, they with respect to the issue of men- chiatric facility.
say that this is merely a result
negotiate its admission policies'U hospitaldoa r
with a labor union.
University official John For-
syth attacked the GEO for act- a
ng in bad faith. "They're trying contract at
to win through the grievance
procedure things they couldn't
win at the bargaining table," he (Continued from Page 1) The two parties also agreed
said. nel for blooddrawing units as to establish a task force to
Daniel Tsang, GEO media soon as financially possible. An study the working hours and
committee chairman, admitted HOA request to hire an addi- scheduling of interns and resi-
that the memorandum did not tional x-ray technician has, ac- dents, many of whom work over
specifically deal with recruit- cording to Hodeen, already been 100 hours per week. The group
ment, but claimed that it includ- implemented. The HOA has con- will make recommendations af-
ed it "implicitly." He said HEW tended that both blooddrawing ter its study is completed, but
guidelines "require it." and x-ray technical work were those recommendations are not
services which were lacking in binding.
IT IS unclear at this point personnel and consequently were
exactly what HEW does require. detrimental to patient care. "WE'D LIKE to see an 80-
The University claims that its Only a minor procedural issue hour maximum." Hodeen com-
GSA program exceeds any pub- remained unresolved in the con- mented, "but we didn't get a
:lished HEW requirements. flict, such as the method by commitment."
HEW has had an opportunity which the University will make Another task force will be
to see the University's pro- contributions to a disability in- t
gram, but has not commented surance policy for the doctors. created to collect data on the
onig ytrTefeealdpat The University has refused arn racial and sexual composition of
on it yet. The federal depart- OA equest to makerthes con the house staff, and to formu-
ment has, however, approved tribution through a "check-off" late a plan which will increase
the University's overall affirma- system of direct paycheck de- the representation of women and
tive action plan. ductions.ymtem ofdiecnayhek e
tiedcin. minorities among the interns
3 tnn resin__- s._+V LIIOknnrr1% nn I~lI

r
t

Contrasting the small crowds of late with its
fine quality menu and live nightly music, the Golden
Falcon at 314 S. Fourth Ave. appears to be the most
underratcd entertainment spot in Ann Arbor.
One can drop into the Falcon for an afternoon
meal and often listen to one of the bands practice
troublesome numbers and warm-up for the night.
It's this kind of casual elegance that distinguishes
the Falcon.
The featured entree among diverse offerings is
Ginger Beef. Choice sirloin is sauteed with Ginger
sauces and topped with green peppers to create a
soulful and distinct plateful which is served with
fluffy steamed rice. Choice of soup or salad and
rolls round out this most satisfying $3.60 dinner.
A Mediterrannean Salad Bowl at the Falcon can
put an end to your lunchtime doldrums with Feta
cheese, ripe olives, tomato wedges and imported an-
chovies over an awesome portion of tossed salad.
If you crave the bounties of the waters, try Pan
Fried Colorado Springs Trout, fresh-frozen and rush-
ed to our fair city. Or if it's the ocean flavor that
must be savored to slake the urge, try the Scallops,
or Golden Fried Shrimp.
The Falcon's menu has the full range of sand-
wiches that America loves best: Tenderloin Steak
Sandwich $3.45, 3-decker Club Sandwich $1.50, Rue-

ben $1.40, The Falcon'Deluxe one-third pound ham-
burger with all possible fixings $1.40, Hot Pastrami
on special bun $1.00, Hot Corned Beef on Rye $1.00,
Cold Turkey Sandwich $.95, and others.
All items on the menu are served from 11 a.m.
to 1 a.m.
Live entertainment every night of the week ap-
pealing to divergent audiences has been the trade-
mark of the Golden Falcon.
Manager Nick Benos owns to his ethnic roots on
Thursday nights with Greek food, music and dancing.
All are welcome to join in the traditional folk danc-
ing, listen to the Bosouki music and enjoy the popu-
lar dishes.
The band Headwind has been pleasing listeners
and dancers alike at the Falcon for months. You can
still find them on stage Friday and Saturday nights.
'D.J.' eminates soulful sounds on Wednesday and
Sunday nights and consistently draws a boogie-get
down black crowd, especially on Sunday nights ac-
cording to Benos.
The week's entertainment is rounded out with
the jazz sounds of 'Jack Crim', the reorganized Ann
Arbor Experimental Jazz Band, on Tuesday and
Monday nights.
The weekend cover charge is $1.

On July 29, 1900, Hubert I,
SKinfof Italy, was assassinated.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
I Volume LXXXVI, No. 57'
Saturday, November 8, 1975
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
p ~hone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a iily Tuesday through
Sunday morning duriing the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by maili outside Ann Ar-
Ibor
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
C h'c

'adresidents. A tho h no dt
INSTEAD, the'U' prefers to has been collected, it has been
add an equivalent amount to estimated that approximately 95
the six per cent salary increase per cent of the doctors are
already granted to the doctors. white males.
Hodeen emphasized that this is On Wednesday, HOA members
a difference of procedure, not. began picketting at the entrance
dollars, and that the amount of to 'U' Hospital and doctors
the contribution to the insurance working inside the faclity ne-
policy, $50, had already been glected s o m eadministrative
agreed upon. work. The. protest continued
Hodeen remained non-commit- t h r o u g h Thursday and was
tal when aske to predict the terminated as the HOA re-
outcome of Wednesday'sratifi- solved their dispute early yes-
cation vote. "We'll see what the terday morning.
membership wants to do," he
said. He went on to warn that The Phoenicians were the
"the disability issue could cause boldest sailors of the Mediter-
a problem at ratification time." ranean in the ancient world.

W'P4hi0p e'ice4

' a
goo
d

Pit

9/
4 .

SERVING LUNCHES AND DINNERS
Mon.-Sat.: 11:00 a.m.-2:00 a.m.; Sun.: 12 noon-2:00 a.m.
Kitchen Open until 1 a.m. Cocktails until 2 a.m.
208 W. HURON NEAR MAIN
ANN ARBOR 995-0505
DANCING FRIDAY & SATURDAY With
STRUTTERS' BALL
SMORGASBORD WEDNESDAY & SATURDAY
100 FOODS $4.95
DINNERS FROM $3.95 UP LUNCH $1.50 UP
SUNDAY BUFFET $2.95
9 COCKTAILS 0 WINES BANQUETS
'uba it Continental Dining
102 S. FIRST 663-2401

OYSTER BAR &
THE SPAGHETTI MACHINE
301 W. HURON 663-2403
SALAD BAR 13 TYPES OF SPAGHETTI
GREEN & WHOLE WHEAT NOODLES OYSTERS, CLAMS,
SHRIMP, SCALLOPS, LOBSTER, RAINBOW TROUT
VEAL, BEEF TOURNADOES OSOBUCO
COCKTAILS-WINE
AN UNUSUAL CONCEPT OF P U B L I C DINING
WHERE EVERYTHING HAPPENS IN FRONT OF
YOUR EYES-WITH FRESH INGREDIENTSONLY.
AT EXTREMELY MODERATE PRICES
Heidelberg
215 N. MAIN 0 663-7758
DINING: Complete German a n d American
menu 1 1 a.m.-1 :30 a.m. Salads
DANCING: German Bands on Saturday nights
BANQUET FACILITIES
RATHSKELLER:. Folk music sing-along Fri. &
Sat. nights
(NO COVER)I

UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
THE NAZARENE CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
409 N. Division - (Formerly Lutheran Student
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor Gordon Ward, PastorI
Church School-9:45 a.m. Chapel)
Morning Worship-11:00 a.m. 801 S. Forest Ave. at Hill St.
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m. Sunday Service at 10:30 a.m.<
* * * * * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
I OF CHRIST CHURCH
Presently Meeting at 1432 Washtenaw-662-4466f
YM-YWCA, 530 S. Fifth Worship - Sunday, 9:30 and!
David Graf, Minister 11:00 a.m.
Students Welcome. Holy Communion-Wednesday,
For information or transpor- 5:15-5:50 p.m.
tation: 663-3233 or 662-2494. Young Adult meals-Sunday,
10:00 a.m. - Sunday Worship 12:30 p.m.; Wednesday, 6:00
Service. p.m. ($1.00).
* * * Study and discussion-
CAMPUS CHAPEL 11:00 a.m. Sunday-Adult Bible
1236 Washtenaw Ct. study.
Pastor: Don Postema 8:00-9:00 p.m. Monday-semi-
Christian Reformed Worship. nar on Dietrich Bonhoeffer's'
Sunday Worship-10 a.m. and "Ihe Cost of Discipleship."
6 p.m. 12:00-1:00 Thursday - Thurs-
day Forum (includes lunch, $1).
UNIVERSITY REFORMED ( Chancel C h oi r - 7:00-8:30
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron Thursday.
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice, For other information on the
Ministers Young Adult Program call the
9:30 a.m.-Church School. Rev. Peter C. Budde or Jo Annt
5:30 m.-Student Suimer Staebler, 662-4466.

ANN ARBOR CHURCH
OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block West of
U of M Stadium)
Bible Study - Sunday, 9:30
a.m.-Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m.
and 6:00 p.m.
Need Transportation? C a 11
662-9928.
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Stat. -t Huron and Washngton
Worship Services:
8:30 a.m. - Communion Serv-
ice-Chapel.
9:30 a.m.-Worship Service-
Sanctuary.
11:00 a.m.-Worship Service-
Sanctuary.
S e r m o n: "What Do You
Want?" by Donald B. Strobe.
Worship services are broad-
cast over WNRS-AM (1290) each
Sunday from 11:00 to 12:00.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
Sunday, Nov. 9:
5:30 p.m. - Undergrads Cele-
bration.
6:15 p.m.-Supper.
7:30 p.m.-Grads and single
young adults on Transidental
Mediation in lounge.
Thursday, Nov. 13:
Grads and single young adults
meet at 7:00 for dessert and
program at Harriet Behm's.
8:00-Divorced and separated
group in Green Room.
* * *

10:30 a.m.-Morning Worship.
* * *

* * *
BETHLEHEM UNITED

Cottage INN
re- a sa - A A.

The Real

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH OF CHRIST
CHURCH, 306 N. Division 423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149
8:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist. Minister: Orval L. E. Willimann
10:00 a.m. - Morning Prayer, 9:00 a.m.-Chapel Service.
and Sermon. 10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.I
* * * 1 10:00 a.m.-Church School. I
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Child care at 10:00 a.m. serv-

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