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October 26, 1975 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-10-26

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Rage Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, October 26,'1975

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, October 26, 1975

PRESENTING THE RETURN OF
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Heart's Club Band
A 60 song review of all the great Beatles hits, complete with
Beatle costumes and Beatle history. An absolute must for
any Beatle admirer.

U alumni visit alma mater Sadat desires
*with memories of the past Aid
(Continued from Page 1) comingr game!" more enthuisiastic than he ex'-

MONDAY, OCT. 27

$2 STUDENTS; $2.50 ALL OTHERS

AND
Kinky Friedman and the Texas Jew Boys

ing dock in the morning."
MERRY Berglund, a '67 Edu-
cation School graduate, remem-
bers the renowned "Bell par-
ties" as one of the big sources
of campus entertainment.
"When you turned 21 (the
legal drinking age until a few
years ago), you would go to the
Pretzel Bell and stand on the
table and chug a pitcher of
beer - the Bell provided the
beer," said Berglund.
"I love Michigan," she add-
ed. "I enjoyed the game, but I
enjoyed more hearing that
Michigan State lost their Home-

NOT ALL the alumni were as
caught up in University events.
Martin Monroe, a '56 Business
School graduate, said he was
"not even familiar with the
campus any more."
However, Monroe enjoyed
yesterday's game against Indi-j
ana. "What can I say - we
won," he said unemotionally.
James Stinchcombe and his
wife Edie both graduated from
the Rackham graduate program
in 1949, and now live in Phila-
delphia.
STINCHCOMBE found the
game relaxing and the crowd

4 Vlil/.ll$ sC1111V s

also appearing:
GRIEVOUS ANGELS
TUESDAY-8 PO.
OCTOBER 28
Admission $2.50

pected. "It looks like the
Homecoming spirit is coming
back," the alumnus said.
However, Edie said, "The
displays were bigger in our
day. We had a pep rally with a.
bonfire."
She said she regretted miss-
ing Friday's phone-booth stuff-
ing contest, but made it to yes-
terday's Mudbowl and the bi-I
cycle race.
"I think the campus looks bet-
ter now," she continued on a
different note. "It's more uni-
fied - looking somehow."
Finally the small crowd of
alumni thinned down, and even!
the weary Homecoming spon-
sors, University Activities Cen-
ter's Don Lovett and Richard
Sherry, ambled out to eat din-
ner. A lone figure remained in!
the vast, darkening room,
chewing on his pipe and slow-
ly sampling cookies - perhaps,
recalling those Saturday nights:
in the old ballroom of the '40's.

Wit. . J _ .. . ._

r

Performing some of their most popular hits, "Ride Em Jewbov," "High On Jesus," and
"Beach Party Boo Boo." Combining the styles of Merle Haggard and Lenny Bruce Kinky
persists in writing for and singing to, that most neglected group: Bigots! ". . . Their
lives are just as dreary as those of enlightened folks," Kinky reminds us. Never intend-
ing to offend, Kinky and his band produce some of the finest country western rock
today. Kinky and the boys are in Ann Arbor fresh from a 5-day sellout appearance at
Ratso's in Chicago. Don't miss them!
5 EL t9 5
516 E. Liberty 994-5350

S"... To Establish Justice ..."!!
PETITIONS ACCEPTED NOW
FOR 5 VACANCIES ON
CENTRAL
STUDENT JUDICIARY
(ALL CAMPUS SUPREME COURT)
PETITIONING CLOSES NOV. 6, 1975
Men, Women, & All Minorities of All
Colleges Are Encouraged To Apply.
Stop by SGC Offices, 3rd Floor Mich-
igan Union to pick up a petition and
sign up for an interview.
- _ _ _ -

Sadat

LECTURE-Tuesday, Oct. 28
DR. ITAMAR RABINOVITCH
(Director Shilooh Institute for Middle Eastern
Studies-Tel Aviv Univ.)
WILL SPEAK ON
"THE HISTORICAL BACKGROUND TO
THE PRESENT CRISES IN LEBANON"

i
i

I

4:00 p.m.--Rm. 200 LANE HALL
Sponsored by Center for Near Eastern and North African Studies

(Continued from Page1)
complained about reports of
U.S. aid commitments of $2.3
billion to Israel.
"But there will not be any
announcements or any deci-
sions as to a program for mili-
tary aid to Egypt at this time,"
he said.
The United States "will look
very sympathetically at Egyp-
tian requests" for economic
aid, Kissinger said, and add-
ed: "We are not in any posi-
tion to make any specific com-
ments at this time, but we are
prepared to have a general
discussion."
Sadat is the first Egyptian
head of state to make a formal
visit to the United States.
As Sadat began his trip, the
Soviet Union attacked his poli-
cies and the recent Sinai agree-
ment negotiated by U. S. Secre-
tary of State Henry A. Kissing-
er. Without naming Sadat by
name, the article in the Com-
mnimist mnrtv daily Pravda call-
ed the Sinai accord a "blow
to the Arab peonles of Pales-
tine" and to "the unity of
Arab peones." The article ac-
csed unnamed Egyptians of
undermining Soviet - Egyptian
relations and distorting Soviet
actions. Its timing pointed up
the Kremlin's anger at Egyp-
tian - American rapproche-
ment.
Ohio State's Archie Griffin
leads the nation's returning col-
lege football players with 3,820
yards rushing. Joe Washington
of Oklahoma ranks second with
3,124 yards and Kentucky's Son-
ni Collins is third with 2,685.
THE MICHIGAN DAlY
Voinme LXXXVI. No. 46
Sunday, October 26. 1975
s edited and managed by students
at the: niversity of Michigan. News
th'ane 764-0962. Second class postage
psid at Ann Arbor,-Micigan 48106.
Pmblssheds d a i sy Tuesday through
Suyday morning during the Univer-
ste year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Abor, Michigan 4104. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept thru April (2 seme=
tars); $13 by mail outsde Ann Ar-
hor
summer sessin published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor: $7.50 by mail outside Ann
jArbor.
"U"Towers
IvRAELI
ART EXHIBIT
at HILLEL
WEI L-SHAR I R-ROTHOLTZ
FRIDAY, OCT. 24-
THURS., OCT. 30
(Mon. thru Thurs. 9:00-5:00,
{7 :00-10 :00 P.M.)
1429 HILL ST.
663-3336

Subscribe to The Michigan Daily

04

eclipse jazz presents

A message to future bill payers:

Your well-being, and that of your family's, depends on a sound
economic climate. Yet there are millions of people exerting an in-
fluence on that climate who have never had a basic course in what
makes our system tick. Realizing that every citizen has "a need to

know," The Business Roundtable is sponsoring messages about the
inner workings of our American free enterprize system.
They are giving this special "mini-course" monthly exposure be-
fore the country's largest reading audience in Reader's Digest.

ADVERTISEMENT

YOU
PAY FOR,
WHAT
YOU.
GET

Nothing is free: money from
Washington, new safety devices for
your car, the reduction of industrial
pollution. In the final analysis, the
bill lands in your lap

4z wO1
0

HE city of New York awoke
rom a disastrous dream last
pring. For decades it had
Slived beyond its means.
Many of its citizens had come to
believe they could get something
without paying for it-"free" col-
lege educations; huge welfare bene-
fits; wage increases for city employes
double and triple those in the federal
government; extravagant, fiscally
unrealistic pensions.
Result: The city' found itself $750
million short of meeting its current
operating expenses, andwas forced
to pay close to $2 billion yearly on
its past debts. "No other city in the
United States has provided such a
range of free services and diver-
sions," reported one news magazine.
The only problem was, those
"services and diversions" were not
free at all. In fact, the most elemen-
tary economic truth is: Few things
are really free. We must always pay-
the piper when the dance is over.
In our personal lives, this pay-the-
piper principle seems so logical, so
matter-of-fact, that we seldom ques-
tion it. Whether we're offering a
child piano lessons, buying an air
conditioner or choosing steak over
hamburger, we weigh the benefits
to be derived, and we expect to pay
the price.
But somehow we seem to aban-'

rently popular "Tax the big corpo-
rations-let them pay for it." But
who really does pay? Let's examine
just one case.
The Union Carbide plant at Al-
loy, W. Va., which produces ferro-
alloys for the steel and aluminum
industries, used to be known as "the
world's smokiest factory." It poured
out 91,900 tons of particles a year,
more than that emitted by all of
New York City. In 1971, Union Car-
bide began to take steps to meet a
clean-up schedule developed with
state environmental officials-and
today the air is clear over Alloy.
Thanks to a vast complex of envi-
ronmental equipment that requires
almost as much room as the plant
itself, emissions have been reduced
by 97 percent.
What has the Alloy clean-up cost?
Union Carbide spent $33 million for
the elaborate anti-pollution devices.
Operation and maintenance of the
system cost more than $3 million a
year. As a result, plant operating
costs have risen more than io per-
cent. Who will pay this cost? The
company initially, certainly. But
ultimately the clean-up has to be
reflected in the prices of alloys for
high-strength and specialty pur-
poses, and for aluminum products.
Eventually, all of us, in buying
goods made from steel and alumi-

Such decisions are easily resolved
at the personal level. (Is the extra
room on the new house, the tape-
deck for your car, worth the extra
dollar outlay to you?) But when
it comes to social goals, we may
not be fully aware of the facts, main-
ly because the decision-making is
in the hands of our surrogates-
Congressmen and regulatory-agency
officials.
Whether the decisions they make
for us are wise or unwise is ultimate-
ly decided by the voters-although
it may take a long time. But wheth-
er these decisions will cost us money
has already been immutably decided
by economic reality. Americans, for
instance, have spent an estimated
$2.4 billion extra on their automo-
biles since 1972 to accommodate
various government-mandated com-
binations of wires, lights and buz-
zers to force them to buckle their seat
belts. Ordered "on behalf of" the
public, these devices proved to be
overwhelmingly unpopular, and the
law requiring them was finally re-
scinded by Congress as a "social
goal" not worth the cost.
As you read this, other bills for
social goals-many of which we
may find admirable-are being tot-
ted'up. We will pay for what we get,
so we must be sure that as a nation
we want, need and can afford them.
In the steel industry, for example,.
we must be prepared for the possi-
bility that new, stiffer government
anti-pollution standards will cause
steel-industry costs to increase by $25
to $30 a ton over the next eight
years. Other costs-energy, raw ma-
terials and labor-will also drive
prices up. The companies will bear
the brunt initially, but we consum-
ers will finally pay. (Steel men don't
print their own money; they make it
by selling their products.) Part of the
increased cost of a new car or refrig-
erator will go toward clearing the air
over Chicago, Baltimore, Pittsburgh
or Birmingham-wherever steel is
made.
Or consider, for instance, the ef-
fect of a nronosed federal reulaition

companies estimate that this regula-
tion will add at least 75 cents to the
retail cost of each tire. In other
words, according to the manufactur-
ers, if you buy four tires, you will pay
$3 for both symbols you can't under-
stand and additional testing that will
add nothing to the safety already
required by previous regulations.
Presumably, astute consumers will
bone up on traction, wear and heat-
generation information before they
buy their tires. We must ask our-
selves: Is this regulation really worth
the cost?
Another example: flammability
standards for upholstered furniture
suggested by the Consumer Product
Safety Commission. The regula-
tions, aimed principally at cigarette-
caused fires, are expected to increase
prices of upholstered sofas and arm-
chairs by up to 25 percent. The
furniture industry fears that the
standards could eliminate about 70
percent of fabrics now made for up-
holstery. If we, through our surro-
gates, decide that it is correct for the
government to impose such flam-
mability standards, then we must be
prepared to pay the cost the next
time we buy a couch. And we may
not like the feel or look of the new-
er, nonflammable fabrics.
What all this means is that we, as
part of a complex and interrelated
economy, cannot merely wish for or
advocate some benefit for a "remote"
part of our society. We must also be
prepared to accept a part of the
financial burden. Are we prepared
to pay higher electric bills when we
ask a utility in our area to provide
more generating capacity with less
harm to our environment? Are we
committed to reducing auto emis-
sions and increasing auto safety to
the extent that it may add as much
as $xooo to the price of our cars?
Only when we realize our funda-
mental financial role in the laws
passed and regulations promulgated
by our public officials, will we be
sure to set wise and realistic goals.

Sunday, Nov. 2-8 p.m.-Power Center
ALL SEATS $4.50
TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT:
UAC Box Office, Michigan Union
Both Discount Record Shops
The Blind Pig

TUESDAY NOON-Oct. 28-Ethics & Religion Lounge-3rd floor Union
WHITHER THE PEACE MOVEMENT?
Reflections on the past ten years' struggle to bring a measure of
moral vision to our international policies.
REV. RICHARD FERNANDEZ-Director national religi-
ous anti-war group (Clergy & Laity Concerned) during
height of our war in Southeast Asia.
LUNCH PROVIDED OR BRING A BROWN BAG
ETHICS & RELIGION-3RD FLOOR UNION-764-7442
SUNDAY &MONDAY
"All Y"ou Can Eat"
includes unlimited trips to our famous salad bar, choice of potato
or vegetable and loaves of hot home baked bread.
ADULTS . . . . . . $3.25
CHILDREN (under 12) . . . $1.75
Served Sunday Noon 'Til 8 P.M.-Monday 5 P.M.- 11 P.M.

I

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