100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 04, 1975 - Image 55

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, September 4, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Thursday, September 4, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

. ..i f v.... yf....:1: {
1 ve.: ". u..va:vJ:J"a f 1 ?$},,1 1 ^.w:. ":z"::A f: fvlvA.w "".~ "."v . 11 1^.' J r " 1 . ^.v t vr.. " J. v," c:v l" :v :"cl«"f; f. "al'f v.'f:..."::::vvvrx:"xv. .".":.":.v."x¢v::. :::.:"r .- A :^ :".
.?. +: 1. f ..1. J Y?".''J'"?. '}_ .htiti'}?'L' '? 43 M1":>:::1F::. Ji'?i"?.:J!'.1. ..7A.. . .1.0': f.I. I. It' l.o.... J..v' :': ' J ..1 r ..:.......... .{,":
J.'^.ti' +: ." : ." .1 . J..1.1 .. T.A 4'' fti' .:. ': '':? .vf'f "":. ::. ":.1...:::1.^".:?"t: r:::. ':::.
I{y. ry y y J ." f y f. .. '? .. .... .f f ...............a...":f:Jdi .J..,...::?.^. o
PM A S.i.' ti'd. l.".IN...Pf."::lh ' YVf .si ..Jf. . .J ."ft. '. 1'J': '. "J } '.Qy' y y,' ... v........" ) ' .I..f . .+.
Yl." .,.J.1 f.Alt':.11'^i... .1Ci...1A^i": ... J ?..:C' .1 ."s:$':1{1 .+.'.i .S ':....4........1 .. ..S'A Ahrw..4. :"::^: ?::'...... .:.F.'X't}:':'t} ' .rw. MY ":'..a .°:: ...5:.\.....1 :{v. :bt :i':'. .... .' '''+ .A.... A".Y.'r.".''

Wome'
By CHUCK BLOOM
An embryo must be nurtured before it can ma-
ture.
Michigan's fledgling women's intercollegiate ath-
letic program goes into its second season of com-
petition this year, still suffering from growing
pains but like a baby filly, bred by the best, it
shows a great deal of promise.
Actually this past season was the first full year
of competition for the women's program. Last
year, after the Nov. 1, 1973 recommendation by
the Burns Committee that athletic competition for
women be set up in six sports, a budget was finally
approved in November, delaying the start of acti-
vity for several of the teams.1
"Finally, with a good budget, we have a pattern
on which to build," said Marie Hartwig, Michigan's
associate director for women's intercollegiate ath-
letics. "We are finally operating on a full-time
basis. All sorts of additions have to be made .. .
uniforms, locker space, training facilities. All will
come with time."
Because it was a novice program, the results
from head-to-head competition left much to be
desired. But won-lost figures should be ignored
considering the valuable experience gained by
the Wolverines who played far more establish-
ed schools like Michigan State and Ohio State.
Still, some sports fared well in their initial sea-
son. The swim team won three of four dual meets
and under the coaching of former varsity swimmer

sports improvi

i

Stu Isaac and Johanna High, the women tankers
finished third in both the Big Ten and Midwest
Championships and 18th in the NCAAs. Their NCAA
finish was ahead of the Spartans, who had cap-
tured the Big Ten title.
This season Isaac, will be back at the helm and
the highlight will be the Big Ten Championships to
be held at Matt Mann Pool Feb. 20-21. Workouts
will begin in October.r
The women's tennis team had a fine spring
garnering a 4-1 dual meet record and a sixth place
tie in the conference meet. Coach Carmen Brum-
met announced that a call-out for all prospects will
be Monday, Sept. 8, and this year's schedule will
be split with five matches in the fall and three in
April of 1976.
Junior Jan Karzen led the squad, advancing
to the semi-finals in number two singles at the
Big Tens. Jan's brother Jerry was captain of
-the men's team.
The basketball team, however, suffered more
problems than the inability to win. Coach Carmel
Broder's squad did not even get off the ground
until early December and only six practice ses-
sions were held before exams further interrupted
the campaign, a constant problem for most of the
women's teams last year.
This year a November 1 call-out has been an-
nounced to give all those interested ample oppor-
tunity to tryout for the squad.
The squad was thrusted into games in January

with teams who had trained since November while
the Michigan contingent barely had a week to pre-
pare. After losing six in a row, the Maize and Blue
jelled and came back to win three out of their last
four contests. This season Broders enthusiastically
expects greater things.
Two fall activities, volleyball and field hockey,
will be in full swing at the beginning of school in
September.
The volleyball team, looking to improve on
its 7-13 record, will begin its season on Sept.
24 against Michigan State. The schedule in-
cludes four other home matches played at the
IM Building before the conference meet at
Minnesota.
The field hockey team, coached by Phyllis Ocker,
also seeks to better a 2-8 first season. Its schedule
shows five home dates at Michigan Stadium before
the state tournament at Olivet College.
The synchronized swimming team of Coach Joyce
Lindeman has one home meet, a pentathlon tri-
meet with Eastern Michigan and Western Michi-
gan on Nov. 15. Tryouts will be either Sept. 29 or
Oct. 6.
While many clouds hang over women's mtercol-
legiate athletics as to funds and facilities, the Mi-
chigan program, run by able personnel and under
the auspices of one of the finest overall athletic
programs in the nation, should flourish to the point
where that young filly will soon be able to run with
any horse in the field.

''' J":
::"'"
"'.i. 4
}:" i
:":".
:"!
, .
":':''
i
"i. :
:: i
.:":' tti
}
:;': t
< }: t
"::" f
. : :
':
:^i i
t:L I

§ ~ hh ^ O ^C>eh~> w+ah O~ 1 +i ''ecixh +:
§§
Y
§ A CoAMPUS FA'VORITE FO^R YEARS! I
t
y
§ Va §vnSoa
§ _.

fMsf ... . .. ..... ...........55 ...... . .... .........._......... . rryRr. ..........

Britt, Grote return

(Continued from Page 2)
ed by two recruits: Ricky
Green, who was all-America
at Vincennes Junior College
last year, and a high school
teammate of Robinson; and
Tom Staton, an all-Stater who
jumps well enough to play
forward.
Add to these Baxter, who
started five games last season,
and there's no telling who will
end up playing. Assistant coach
Jim Dutcher wisely declines to
predict anything, noting that no
one ever expected Robinson or
Grote to be the solid starters
they now are.
Kupec's spot is harder to fill,
but assistant coach and recruit-
ing specialist Bill Frieder did
his best-which this year was
very, very good. At press time,
the coaching staff was ardently
trying to convince all-American
Phil Hubbard to enroll at Mich-
igan. He could be the heir-ap-
parent to Kupec.'
Hubbard is 67, and can jump
and shoot well enough to be
called one of the ten best high
school players in the country.
Frieder believes he could start
immediately for Michigan.
But Bergen, the 6-10 transfer
from Utah, is also available for
service. A fine hook shot and
good passing skills make him a
valuable asset.
Two other recruits are for-
wards Bobby Jones and Alan

Hardy. The former, a 6-6 leap-
er, could play center, too.
Hardy, from Detroit North-
western, is another all-Stater.
But the most important to suc-
cess next year will be the con-
tinued good play of Britt, Grote
and Robinson. Each averaged
double figures last year, and
played a tough defense charac-
teristic of Michigan.
Britt, one of the smallest for-
wards in the country, is also
one of the quickest, and can
jump with players half a foot
taller. Grote is an aggressive,
physical guard who scores many
of his points inside.
Robinson, 6-6 and still grow-
ing, scores 90 per cent of his
points on strong, twisting in-
side moves.
Those three return, along with
top subs Baxter, Joel Thompson,
Rick White, Lloyd Schinnerer1
and Don Johnston. The entire
team, minus freshmen, were
able to work out together this
summer on a goodwill tour of
Egypt this summer.
With three starters, all the
top reserves, and several fine
recruts on the roster, Michiganf
comes dangerously close to
looking like a contender.
Orr, of course, hopes no one
notices, because it has been a
lot of fun surprising people the
last two years. He'd like to do
it again.

Subscribe to The Michigan Daily

Daily Photo by SUE SHEINER
Look out men!
Michigan's women cagers battle it out with Michigan State
last year in Crisler Arena. Although the Ford Administration
set down new sex discrimination gbidelines this summer,
Michigan already provides facilities for the female cagers.

IF _ - - . -- - --,..- . . - . - . - - .. - -

WELCOME NEW STUDENTS!

- -----f

TA 2 J SU YU8 3u1
iAO a &'rIAa

1
1'

Come by soon and visit us
WE FEATURE:
Michigan Campus Wear

* T-Shirts
* Sweat Shirts

* Jackets
o "M" Blankets

C

Adidas Shoes

OVER 60 MODELS TO CHOOSE FROM

i,'

Danskin

Tights & Leotards

White Stag Speedo
Swim Suits

Athletic Supplies for:

Football
Basketball
Handball

Hockey
Fencing
Volleyball

Baseball
Squash
Tennis

Track
Paddleball
and More

(,I

WE'VE BEEN HERE SINCE 1915

COUNT ON US FOR EXPERIENCE

ill II?

?'kA ?

!III x AIaI . l1

i!I I

I

llll

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan