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October 18, 1975 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-10-18

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r' , L :d-! r ra is.L * 9 Y O'x

Saturday, U.Cober 16, 119

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Poz rA-Fv,

%0

Tandy andCronyn:
Actors

exude

talent,

love

Chu ch

It4 vi'24ip erice4

By ANDREW ZERMAN
Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn are not just
two charming and gifted artists: They're a
couple of very loving people too.
And yesterday morning at Waterman Town
Hall the duo demonstrated what a capacity
they have not only for love, but for displaying
all the emotional nuances that it contains.
In their program, The Many Faces of Love,
the couple presented a montage of poems,
monologues, and readings that were witty,
beautifully written and elegantly performed.
How skillfully the couple avoided preciousness
sentimentality and cliche!
How clever of them to include Thomas Wolfe,
Dostoyevsky, Dylan Thomas, Theodore Rilke
and Benjamin Franklin and to exclude, sublime
as they are, the better-known Shakespearean
sonnets.
Much of the program was devoted to satirical
and bittersweet comments on the nature of mar-
riage and the proverbial war between the sexes.
Interesting glances from one side of the stage
to the other had an odd way of suggesting simul-
taneously gentle malice and irritated love be-
tween the two actors. They are, incidentally,
married in real life.
But the Cronyns didn't limit themselves to
the trials of domestic life. Dylan Thomas's "Do
Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night" extolled
love of living and a soliloquoy from Shake-
speare's Henry VI considered the potential dan-
gers of frustrated love.
By using such a broad definition of "love,"
the Cronyns had no trouble in maintaining va-
riety in the program.
But my favorite selections, interestingly
enough, both dealt with "love remembered."
First, Cronyn read a passage from Wolfe's
Of Time and the River in which a young boy
remembers the strange but vivid ways in which
his older brother, now dead, displayed affection.
Monteverdi c
By revive the Bt
f,
By RICHARD JAMES '50, an orchestra
For an audience glutted on and six soloists.
standard concert repertoire, the $ The seven Mon
appearance of Hamberg's Mon-1 gals on the proj
teverdi choir and Orchestra in various soloists,
Hill Auditorium Thursday eve- soloists with diff
ning provided a refreshing and chestral accomn

Never moving from behind a podium and
using minimal gestures, Cronyn was spell-bind-
ing as he read a dialogue between the two
brothers, acting out both parts and yet never
letting us forget that we were witnessing thel
scene through the eyes of the younger brother.;
Was it those elongated pauses that kept re-

UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
409 N. Division
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-11:00 a.m.
Evening Warship-7:00 p.m.

CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Pastor: Don Postema
Christian Reformed
Sunday Worship-10
6 p.m.

Warship.
a.m. and.

* * *
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,

minding us that all this existed now only in theFRTUIE MTHDS SC NIT
II1II~i~ S ili iiHIh X1L~ HW I~~'il te FIRST UNITED METHODIST C 1i IT
memory of the surviving brother? CHURCH 1833 Washtenaw
Was it an intangible suggestion that gave the Stat .t Huron and Washngton Sunday Service and Sunday
entire reading such a feeling of loss and nos-' Worship Services: School-10:30 a.m.
talgia? 8:30 a.m.-Communion Serv- Wednesday Testimony Meet-
How did Cronyn create distinct melancholy in ice-Chapel. mg-8:00 p.m.
930 a.m.-Worship Service_' Child Care-Sunday, under 2
seconds? The only answer is mysterious and Sanctuary. years; Wednesday, through 6'
insufficient: talent and artistry. 11:00 a.m.-Worship Service- years.
As if this weren't enough to stir our hearts Sanctuary. Midweek Informal Worship.
Tandy proceeded to break them completely Sermon: "On Waiting For Reading Room-306 E. Lib-!
with a monologue from A Streetcar Named God" by Dr. Donald B. Strobe. erty, 10-6 Monday and Friday;a
Desire. Worship services are broad- 10-5 all other days; closed Sun-
In that monologue Blanche tells the story of cast over WNRS-AM (1290) each days,
hSunday from 11:00 to 12:00. I
her beloved husband's suicide, which she caused WESLEY FOUNDATION NEWS ST. ANDREW'S EPSICOPAL
by an uncontrollable remark made after dis- Sunday, October 19: CHURCH, 306 N. Division
covering he is a homosexual. 1:15 p.m.-Meet at Wesley to 8:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
Tandy didn't attempt a young, flamboyant go on Hunger Walk. 10:00 a.m. - Holy Communion
Blanche. She simply threw her hand up to her 5:30 p.m.-Supper, Pine Room. and Sermon. *
mouth after the most horrible part of he 5:30 p.m.-Grads and. Single
story, as if she had commnitted the crime all ?Young Adults meet in parking BETHLEHEM UNITED
over again, just in the telling of it. It was a;lot to go to potluck supper at CHURCH OF CHRIST
1434 Collegewood, Ypsilanti, fol-. 423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149
small gesture but a grand one. lowed by time for sharing per- Minister: Orval L. E. Willimann
At the luncheon a lot of Ann Arbor matrons sonal religious experiences. 9:00 a.m.-Chapel Service.
asked a slew of silly questions about the 6:30 p.m. - Celebration, Wes- 10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.
'Cronyns' marriage, children and house as if ley Lounge. 10:00 a.m.-Church School.
the couple there was Drs. Brothers and Spock. 8:45 p.m.-Last chance to join Child care at 10:00 a.m. serv-
In between all that, Tandy lamented the fact an Experience in Faith meeting ice.
that people don't go to the theatre enough (how at the Beavin's home. Open to. Service broadcast on WNRS
anyone interested. (1290 AM).
true, how true) and Cronyn commented on the Monday October 20:(*
recent proliferation of regional theatre in 7:45 a.m.-Breakfast and dis- UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
America despite competition by movies and cussion on Basic Christian Con- CHAPEL (LCMS)
television. cepts, Pine Room. 1511 Washtenaw Ave. 663-5560
The Cronyns exhibited the same grace, Thursday, October 23: Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor#
warmth and intelligence off-stage that was evi- 7:00 p.m. - Grads and Single Sunday Morning Worship at
dent on-stage and I left a little starry-eyed. Young Adults, dessert and pro- 9:15 and 10:30 a.m.
;gram. Call 668-6881. Sunday Morning Bible S:udyI
8:00 p.m.-Divorced and Sep- at 9:15 a.m.
s arated Group, Green Room. Midweek Worship Wednesday
oir, orchestra' Friday, October 24 at 10:00 p..
6:30 p.m.-Wesley Foundation
Annual Fall Board dinner and LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
meeting, Pine Room and CHURCH ,(ALC-LCA)
u TO R e ;Lounge. * -(Formerly Lutheran Student
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL 801 S. F'rest Ave. at Hill St.
of at least 40' Barbara Schlick, the soprano (Catholic) Gordon Ward, Pastor
soloist, was featured in two 1331 Thompson-663-0557 Sunday Service at 10:30 a.m.
teverdi madri-' short madrigals with full choir I Weekend Masses:
gram featured and orchestra. Like the other Saturday-5 p.m. CANTERBURY HOUSE
and groups of singers, Ms. Schlick's voice had Su:day - 7aa.m), 9 a.m , (E iscopal)
ferent size or- a light, tightly focused sound a.m., noon, and 5 p.m 218 N. Division-66-0606
animents both with verv little vibratop 9:30 a.m. North Campus). n an N r

5

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw-662-4466
Worship - Sunday, 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.
Holy Communion-Wednesday,
5: 15-5:50 p.m.
Young Adult meals - Sunday,
12:30 p.m.; Wednesday, 6:00
p.m. ($1.00).
Study and discussion-
11:00 a.m. Sunday-Adult Bible
study.
8:00-9:00 p.m. Monday-semi-
nar on Dietrich Bonhoeffer's
"The Cost of Discipleship."
12:00-1:00 Thursday - Thurs-
day Forum (includes lunch, $1).
Chancel C h o i r - 7:00-8:30
Thursday.
For other information on the
Young Adult Program call the
Rev. Peter C. Budde or Jo Ann
Staebler, 662-4466.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at
YM-YWCA, 530 S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome.
For information or transi_)r-
tation: 663-3233 or 662-2494.
10:00 a.m. - Sunday Worship
Service.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

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Jessica Tandy

I

r--- ----- , 1

Even a very
skimpy sringleton
Scan 2 02iM hand
By MARK FRIEDLANDER

North
4 K 10 9 6
V Q J 8
f.743
4Q76
West E
45 47
V 10652 V A
* KQJ9 + A
K1082 .9
SSouth

East
42
93
10 8
4

f
jS
3j7
f{1
t
3
I
t
S2

mond. Declarertpulled trumps,
then forced out the ace o1
hearts. East made South ruff
another diamond. Declarer sub-
sequently lost a trick to the king
of clubs, but he made the rest-
ten tricks in all.
Despite a combined total of
only 23 points in the North-South
hands, game is cold. if, how-
ever, North's hearts and dia-
monds were interchanged, even
fthree spades would have had
nroblems. The same is true of
slam contracts:

The Beatle's
HELP
and
HARD
DAY'S
NIGHT
ALL SEATS
$1.50
Saturday
Midnight
Only
r ~MANN. THEARS
-- VIL 1G - -
~16913O"

4AQJ83I
VK74
S6
.AJ53
South West North East
14 pass 24 pass :
3 ; pass 4 4 Allpass
Opening lead: King of*
The First Commandment of'
the Ten Commandments for
bridge states: Thou shalt acquire
26 points for game and 33 points.
to achieve a slam. This is the:
first thing any beginner learns.
What no one tells the beginner,
however, is that other factors
may influence these require-?
ments. Distribution is the most!
important of these other factors.
A properly placed singleton can
often bring home the skimpiest
of games.
A singleton is properly placed;
when there is no duplication by
high cards opposite it. Since;
possession of a singleton guar-i

North
A A K 8 2
V A J 9 5
f Q 7 4 31
.4.10
West East
10 4 5 3 A Q 7 6
82 V63
96 + J 1082
K Q J 5 4 . A976

4
V
4

- l...v -----.----.-k1-.--.----..-," --.. .-........-.
even intoxicating glimpse of a with and without choir.
300 year old musical. style The first and last madrigals nently suited to the style
The 100 person ensemble - used the largest ensembles and these works but seemed to fr
mostly quite young performers offered the only chance, all too the singers up for an agili
-presented a program of mad- brief, to hear the beautiful and clarity in rapid figur
rigals, generally performed by voice of baritone Berthold Pos- 'h ch world hardly be sur
much smaller groups, and a semeyer. fective - if possible - with t
mass of Joseph Haydn selec- The two tenors, Nigel Rogers louder, heavier vocal style a
tions - frequently performed and Ian Partridge, were fea- wide vibrato common to m
by a larger force. Yet both tured in two works; "Zefiro siners today.
were very successful. torna" and "Mentre vaga an-,
The madrigals chosen by the gioletta." The first was a de- The second half of the co
ensemble's conductor, Jurgen lightful, lilting duet accompan- cert was given over to Josei
Jurgens, were late madrigals of ied by a small continuo ensem- Havdn's "Missa Cellensis." TI
the early Baroque composer ble. orchestra assumed a more co
Claudio Monteverdi and well' The latter madrigal was much ventional i n s t r u m eI
deserving of the subtitle: "Vir- more technically demanding tation though retaining i
tuosi Madrigals and Concertos." and provided an elegant ve- small size.
They were served up to the hicle for the virtuosity of these Throughout, Jurgens mail
audience by a choir of nearly two gentlemen. tained the light, stylish flay
of the work although a bit mot
dynamic contrast here mig
] vband head haveenhanced it.
Soprano Barbara Schlick wE
the highlight of the entire se
and half of the concert. He
crystal clear voice render

mn -
of
ee
ty
es:
he
nd
ost
n-
;ph
'he
an-

A * *
ANN ARBOR CHURCH
'OF CHRIST

.SeO Tr. tCLUIU111 RlUd

1.

1214: s. university ,

SAT. and SUN.
2:00-4:15-6:30-8:45

to"e mouI Wcx eso
U of M Stadium)
Bible Study - Sunday, 9:30 The__rePhn___68-641_
a.m.-Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a m.
and 6:00.p.m.'. as -
Need Transportation? C a 1I
662-9928.
* * *
UNIVERSITY REFORMED i . P 62
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron OPEN at 12:45
v.± 1- f ,+Al-- Vl--CAT r C -4. 1 S7

rist with a meal following.

South
A J 4
V K Q 10 7 4
f A K 5
. 832
West North
pass 44
pass 44
All pass

n- |alvin Malefyt, Alan
its Ministers
9:30 a.m.-Church

Rice,
School.

So'ith
1 v
4,f
6 v

East
pass
pass

n-
or
re
ht
as
le-
Cer
,ed

Opening lead: King of 4
North's four club call, known
as a suinter-bid, showed a forc-

9:30a .m.-Chur 114a ch1ool.
5:30 p.m.-Student Supper.
10:30 a.m.-Morning Worship.
The Feathered Serpent
IMPORTS & CRAFTS
FROM THE AMERICAS
309 E. Liberty
Ann Arbor, Michicon 48103
Telephone (313) 995-4222

antees that declarer can trump ing raise in hearts including a
the second and third rounds of 4naleton cllb. South could judge
the suit, kings, queens, and the perfect fit and cue bid the
jacks in the same suit of part- ace of diamonds. North recip-
ner's hand are wasted. roc-ted, showing the ace of
Experienced players are so sn-des. and South bid the slam.
aware of the value of the proner Aain. because of the promer
singleton that a number of ways: 'iiletn. the slam is cold. West
have been devised to discover' on-ened the king of clubs and
how valuable the singleton is. fhffed to a trimn. South won
The strange call of three dia- in his bvd and riffed a club,
'monds in the above auction is returned to his hand by pulling
exactly such a bid. the rest of the trumps, and
South bid three diamonds to rffed his last cllb. After cash-
announce that he was interested ine dilmmv's honors, South
in game and held a singleton taoied his hand and claimed.
diamond. This is called a short- If North's.. minor suits were
suit game try. North, looking at switehed, even f i v e spades
eight mediocre points, could tell wold require a lot of luck. But
that none of his meager strength with the cards placed as they
was wasted, so he took a stab were, only 27 points were neces-
at four spades. snrv to 'guarantee the slam.
Thanks to the power of the Rath beginner and expert would
proper singleton, the play pre-'ke to have 26 points to bid a
sented no problems. The inrg of, aavme and 33 for a slam, but
diamonds held the first trick, nvlv the exnert knows when to!
and South ruffed the second dia- riiregard the rule.

By JAMES FIEBIG
and BRUCE JORDAN
There must be a hundred
good bar bands in and around
' the Ann Arbor area. But despite
all the excellent musicianship,
one seldom finds a local band
with a distinct yet versatile
style.
But last Thursday night at

The rest of the band con-
tributed several fine instru-
mentals. Badger's flute had a
good breathy jazz style and,
Creason displayed a few delic-
ious guitar licks. Pavlovitch on
piano seems to have a well-
trained ear for voicing chords
in both accompaniment and!
solo.

the solos, particularly in the
Kyrie, in superb and tasteful
fashion.
If there was anything disap-t
pointing during the evening it
would have to have been the
audience. They greeted the per-
formance of the Monteverdi
madrigals, truly the highight of
the concert, with surprising
apathy.

Michigan Daily
rts

B ilindiFg e gruptnd
up t ig a new group turne McKee provided a good solid, Nevertheless, this concert will
up that may u st be the ans- bass beat, while Sorise exhibit- undoubtedly be remembered
sto as the group is aply na - ed some technically excellent as one of the highlights of this
ed, had the gall to perform percussion. year.
jazz, folk, blues, rock and pop
in the same set, yet did then
all superbly. IW U D S R E
All Directions includes Ste- E
phen Creason, guitar and cor- PRESENTS TWO FINE EVENINGS OF ENTERTAINMENT
ne;Pat Sorise, drums; Ralph
IMcKee, bass; Dave Pavlovitch, PROCTOR & BE RGMAN
acoustic and Rhodes piano; TimPR C O& BE G A
Badger, flute and percussion; OF THE
and Leslie Austin, vocals. They FIRESIGN THEATER
combine to play some tasty
music with a well-developed co-
hesiveness.
Vocalist Austin is an enbodi-
ment of two rich styles: Billie
Holliday and Maria Muldaur.
At Thursday evening's set, she
easily sang through sensitive ly-
rical songs like Leon Thomas's FF );:>'
"Song for My Father", yet could
belt out the blues in the immor- 8:00 P.M., OCT. 27-POWER CENTER
tal "Fever" and B. B. King's Reserved Sects-$2.50, $3.00 at door
"The Thrill is Gone."
-__-_THE AWARD WINNING
National Marionette Theater
Cliff'
isi

KOSHER DELI DINNER
AND MOVIE ON THE HILL
AA _ AI I ALJ

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