100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 01, 1975 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, October 1, 1975

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

rlage Five

I

'U'chiefs name their tune
By JAMES BURNS ever possible, and at home likes the mild country sounds of hobby is Mexican music, but "as
You're walking down South U while he reads or does whatever John Denver and Olivia Newton- an old jazz player," he can lis-
late on a Saturday night. Sud- work it is that LSA Acting Deans John, while an R & B urge sends ten to all the music considered
denly, out of an open window in bring home from the office. him to one of his Ray Charles j popular until twenty years ago,
the large white house to your Dean Ragone was more spe- records. But keeping an open about the time the world found
left - the one with the well- cific about his tastes. Ques- ear, he has "just discovered out Elvis wasn't nothin' but a
manicured lawn and impressive. tioned on his choice of music, WUOM," and enjoys the choral hound dog. His favorites of those
facade - comes the wild pound- his rapid reply was2"Borodin's works of Bach. Johnson says he years are Earl Hines and Louis!
aing of drums and the screaming inquiry revealed that he enjoys mood hits me," which includes Armstrong, both of whom he
ails of an ele tricuthe siLouee all types of classical music, and "late in the evening for some- terms "incredible."
of a bespectacled, gray-haired he mentioned Haydn's early thing quiet. Trying to pin Britton down on
man adjusting a knob on a mon- The aforementioned "classical his musical dislikes is difficult,
strous receiver, and swaying his school" are also somewhat mod- but he did admit he doesn't have
body to the heavy metal sounds ern in their choice of musical "an unquenchable desire to hear
of Deep Purple. favorites. With a touch of nos-
Rockin' Robben? Just a fan- .talgic wistfulness, Fleming ex- country-and-western, and that
tasy, for as President Fleming ! > pressed his enjoyment of "the rock concerts are about the only
simply puts it, "I don't like popular music of my era - the types of musical events he
ock." thirties and the forties." Cohen doesn't attend. Says Britton: "I
He is not alone among Univer- prefers the big band sounds of 't str
city chiefs. Dean Wilbur Cohen y. Wayne King, Guy Lombardo stand the marijuana
f the School of Education as- and Glenn Miller, while St. An- smoke.
serts that he "1000 per cent .. toine, who listens to jazz "for: There is more to a university
against rock-and-roll," calling it ; seasoning," likes the sounds of than its academics: there are
"noisy, unmusical, and worth- Louis Armstrong, Charlie Park- the athletics. Their director
less." Engineering School Dean ; ...f.er, and Benny Goodman. Ra- Don Chm liket
David Ragone concurred in a ,*-, gone even admits that "the here, Don Canham, likes the big
w. C. Fieldsian voice, saying Beatles were superb musicians" band sounds of Glenn Miller and
"the current version of caco- ,and also expresses admiration: the country crooning of Charlie
phony drives me right up the for the lyrical work of Simon Rich and Johnny Cash. He lis-
wall." andGarfunkel. tens while he reads at night, for
If not rock, then what do the But what othehe man who he "almos eerdwatchtV."
powers-that-be listen to? For But hears everything? Dean Allen "most never watches TV.'
Fleming, Cohen, and Ragone, as Britton of the School of Music It's not surprising - you know
dem A as Vices reaidentfy Ro esBritto niahe hSstolf Muic
demi AffirsFran Rhdessayshe an tlerte "ustabou

i
I
,
i
i
a
i
G
'
.
i
[
1
,j
,
i
,a
i1
{
';1

SERGI EISENSTEIN'S 1943
IVAN THE TERRIBLE
Part I (at 7:00)
The great Russian director turns his camera to
the past and the first Czar. Eisenstein's most
ambitious work and maybe his greatest.
MY FILMS ... LIFE
VINCE SCILLA
(at 9:05)
A program of films by a local experimental
filmmaker who hos won awards at the last two
film festivals. Scilla will be present to discuss
his work after our screening.
CINEM UILBothshowsO
UUILUfor $2.00 OdAc~Ad

Canham

Johnson

the good guys win on the tube. last week's Baylor game. How-
Basketball Coach Johnny Orr ever, it would seem safe to as-
is a big jazz and blues fan, and sume that he exhibits no special1
picked Ella Fitzgerald, Frank preference for either the music
Sinatra, and Ray Charles as his or the lyrics of "Across The
top vocalists. When does he Field."
listen? "Well, it wakes me up in - --
the mornings .

__. ____ .

Acting LSA Dean Billy Frye and Fry
Law School Dean Theodore St.Fy
Antoine, the answer lies in the
classics. string quartets and Mozart's
The soft-spoken Fleming en- wind music as other favorites.
joys the numerous symphony or- After a hard day with the prob-
chestras that come to Hill Audi- lems of Engin students, he likes
torium, especially when conduct- to relax after five with cock-
ed by Seiji Ozawa, whom Flem- tails and classics.
ing calls "a wonderfully inter- St. Antoine enjoys "old-fash-
esting guy." He plays sympho- ioned music" when he can steal
nies and string quartets as back- time away from the more seri-
ground music for working at ous problems of jurisprudence.
home, being "too busy to really! Noting that "I'd have been hap-
sit down and listen." py if they'd stopped with Bach
Rhodes prefers the stylistic and Mozart," he also enjoysa
classicism of Mozart for his lis- WUOM, although "once in a
tening enjoyment, and seemed while they have too much seri-
surprised when told that others' ous talk when I'd prefer some
replies did not completely re- relaxing music."
flect this preference. "I have It would be easy to conclude
a bunch of daughters around from all this that, as far as U-M
here," Rhodes added, and they bigwigs are concerned, nothing.
apparently do not share his love musically worthwhile has been
of "Don Giovanni," since he is written since the 19th century.
forced to listen to Wolfgang's But wait! Is that some jazz I
works "whenever I get the hear? Or pop? Or even country-
chance." western?
When asked to name his fa- Vice-President for Student
vorite music, Frye adamantly Services Henry Johnson says he
exclaimed, "Beethoven's my is "really more into contempor-
hero! ", although he admits to ary music" including some rock,
also enjoying other types of "so- with his preferences being to-
called classicalmusic." He has I ward individual performers
WUOM on at the office when-I rather than groups. In pop, he
from hell it came-
yDetroit's finest flows
big as 'king of beers'
- .by chi-is kochrnanski -.___

r * aIIYLIISl ILIUWLtfltA., IS fi & aflt SUU
sic to be good." His personal
i VY."} .,"7" ,",\XY1!. t.,"'; .;;;1::}.fr i:N'l f;. . {:} ..;".

A
R
T
S

SHOWS TONIGHT
at 7:00 and 9:00
OPEN at 6:45
The wild ew movie from the
writer-director of FRITZ THE CAT
and HEA VV TRAFFIC!

Although numerous attempts
were made to contact Coach Bo
Schembechler, it was found im-
possible to locate and pin him
down. He seemed to be absorbed
day and night in preparation for
PROGRAM ItfORMAro, 434-1782
WAYSD1 E
SHOWS TODAY of 1-3-5-7-9 !
OPEN at 12:45
LAST 2 DAYS
1
GI _

of the Great Lakes

1923 Geddes Avenue, Ann Arbor
Painting Out of the Nature of Color
A SERIES OF 10 SESSIONS

The Rudolf Steiner Institute

A new approach to water-color paint-
ing implicit in the work of Goethe and
developed by Rudolf Steiner is being
offered by ROBERT LOGSDON, artist-
in-residence.
Training in
Also being offered is a training and ap-
prenticeship in the special new "Lazur"
technique of wall painting.

THE PLACE: The Rudolf Steiner House,
1923 Geddes Ave., Ann Arbor
THE TIMES: Introductory meeting, Saturday, October 4,
1975, 2-3 p.m. Further sessions to be ar-
ranged.
FEES: Introductory meeting complimentary. Course of
10 sessions, $40, students $25. (materials
included.)
- ALSO -
"Lazur" Wall Painting
THE PLACE: The Rudolf Steiner House
1923 Geddes Ave., Ann Arbor
THE TIMES: First Meeting, Saturday, October 4, 1975,
3-4 p.m Further times to be arranged,
FEES: First sesison complimentary, the course: $20, ma-
terials included.

a-reai

Enrollments in both courses are limited Further Inquiries: 994-9885

:":24 f: . :;} ,3; -.. ,.°. c S. 3y jp "., .,: C;.vk.,".v ,:3 ,}Y vw:;':L iii:

NOW SHO'
*41*T L~ 2QhC~i'

TODAY ONLY-"Sleuth"
See it from the beginninq
SHOWS TODAY AT
1:30-3 45-5:05-7:10-9:20
OPEN AT 1:15
WING
' Y-FOX **
MIC IA
CAINE

SINGrLE AE

if

YOL;
See

4W

AUIRENCE:
?)LIVIEP:

START TODAY
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM announces the
in the POWER CENTER for the performing arts

news

happen

COMING
THURS.-Cinderela Liberty (R)
FRI.-The Paper Chase (PG)
SAT.--Zordoz (R)
SUN.-_CargoldsR(PG)
MON.-The Mad Adventures of
"Rabbi" Jacob (G)
TUES.-Horrow House (PG)

My editor tells me that I have
a "relatively free rein" in writ-
ing this column. What does he i
mean by "relatively?" I asked
him if I could reflect on my ex-
periences with the opposite sex.
He said, "Go ahead," but I
changed my mind - some of
these people might still be liv-
ing.
So instead I've decided to do
the community a service and
judge the relative merits of the
most commonly consumedf
beers.
You must realize, of course,
that for any beer you drink,
there's always some exclusive
foreign import hidden away on
the shelves of obscure import
shops somewhere that absolute-
ly puts your favorite brew to
shame.
We'll overlook these beers and
concentrate instead on products
that fall within a college stu-
dent's price range.
For my money (and likewise
for yours), you can't beat
Stroh's. Perhaps I am preju-
diced in saying this - my de-
tractors will call me a candy-
. beer drinker for sure -
but Detroit's own is the lightest,
most refreshing cold beverage
you can drink. And it packs a
wallop besides.
There are, however, those{
who subscribe to the Budweiser
school of drinking. Under this
heading falls Bud, Schlitz,
Pabst, and perhaps a few oth-
er 'populars' - beers that have
a more distinct taste.
In my mind, these beers fall
far short of Stroh's tradition of I
excellence, not because they're
insincere in their efforts, but be-:!
cause they fail to meet the ele-
mentary prerequisites I've set
for my beers.
Bitterness and a distinct after-
aste are normally the signs of
really cheap brew, yet even
udweiser afficionados will at-
ribute these traits to their fa-
'orite. It just doesn't happen
ith Stroh's.
But while on the subject of
cheap beers, Old Milwaukee re-
mains the steal for its usual sub-
buck and a half price. Schaefer,
too, is good in a pinch, but other
than these, you might as well
forget it.
Therefore, as years of person-
I experimentation will testify,
ne can unhesitantly classify the

never let me down.
Finally, for those whose only
intent is to get down-home
schnockered, I understand that
Miller High Life hasathe highest
alcoholic content of all commer-
cial beers. Hence the name.

coll

76-DAILY

WED - SUN OCTOBER 8-12
teaturing
William teath
(Guest Artist-in-Residense
Mr. L eachi appeared as Cyrano de Bergerac i last season's5
Gues.t Artist Serie. Fie conmes fromt the .Asolo State Theatre
of Florida.

i

TODAY IS BARGAIN DAY AT ALL
FIELD THEATRES-All Seats $1.00

BUTTER-
till 5:00.

- _--____ _ _ _ _ . 'I

WED - SUN NOVEMBER 26-30
ass
by Wiliam Shakespeare
Direicted by
Nicholas Pennell
Guest Artist-in-Residence
Mt. Pennel returns to Ann
Arbor after another season
with Stratford Festival Theatre
ot Canada. He appeared as7
Pefl,~les lastseon

r

ARTHUR MILLER'S
WED.-SAT. FEBRUARY 18-21

I

s

Announcing two performances:

Tuesday & Wednesday, October 14 & 15

in the Power Center at 8:00 p.m.

George Gershwin's immortal portrayal of this early American scene is
re-created by the Michigan Opera Theater, as this ambitious production
comes to Ann Arbor following a ten-performance run in Detroit. In the
starring roles are Irene Oliver who has sung the role of Bess in more than
50 performances, and Robert Mosely who has made recent appearances
in Los Angeles as Porgy. They are supported by a company of 70 singers,
with orchestra.
Tickets are now available at 9, $8, $7, and $5
in our Burton Tower office, or by mail.
iA r

Book by Ossie Davis,
Philip Rose. and Peter U'dell
Mus.ic by Gary Geld
Lyrics by Peter U/dell
Based on the play" Purlie Victorious" by Ossie Davis
FEA'IJRINC. A GUEST ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE

I

r ':

INFORMATION
Individual shows go on sale Wednesday, October 1, 1975. Single show orders
filled at that time.
Advance sales through PTP Ticket Office located in Lobby of Mendelssohn
Theatre Building. Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-1 p.m., 2-5 p.m.

Ns

i

m

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan