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September 30, 1975 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-30

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r Tuesday, September 30, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five
'tkIvER~ITY
MT'JCA 1 ~flCTPTV

...................

Corea: Rock with a pinch of jazz

By STEPHEN HERSH dies were fluent and electronic-
and ROBBIE GORDON ; sounding, employing lots of
The spectators at Chick Co- transistorized glissandoes afterr
rea's Hill Auditorium appear- the manner of Jan Hammer of
ance last Friday were relative- the old Mahavishnu Orchestra.
ly tame as rock and roll au- Echoes of the old Mahavishnu
diences go, especially in light sound also cropped up in the
of the frenzy generated from fleet work of 21-year-old guitar-
the same stage three days ear- ist Al DiMeola, as rapid as
lier by rock's rising star Bruce John McLaughlin's and con-
Springsteen. taining more than a touch of
Now don't get it- wrong: Co- the flavor of McLaughlin's fluid,
rea's reception was very loud rapid-fire style.
and friendly. But his isn't the The bearded DiMeola set the
kind of music that moves peo- controls on his black Les Paul
ple to bump in the aisles with for a pure, ringing tone, es-
such abandon that they wouldn't chewing the distortion and wah-
notice if the person they're wah effects he used on Return
bumping should be the star of to Forever's last two albums.
the show, rocking in the crowd "I can't stand the sound of
for a little excitement. my guitar on those albums,"
Corea and Return to Forever he confessed in a brief inter-
don't play danceable tunes. But view shortly before the concert.
that doesn't make them any less "I really hate it."

band's sound lies in the elec-
tric bass plucking of lanky
Stanley Clarke. Grinning con-
tinuously, Clarke pounded outt
a steady stream of relaxed fun-
kiness, but sometimes, when
the compositions called for it,
shot through long runs with
notes as rapidly as DiMeola's,
which is to say so rapid that
they seemed to come in con-
tinuous sheets.
Clarke's solos were the subtle
high points of the show. Using
healthy amounts of bar chords
and high-speed playing, he
kept his eyes lit up and his
head bobbing, often keeping
trading rhythms with drummer
Lenny White.

Drummer White kept his tart,
fast, multi-directional phrases
moving at a consistent pace,
t steadily shooting drops of sweat
and shattered drumsticks into
the hot, limelit air.
In addition to Corea tunes, the
band performed pieces by Di-
Meola and Clarke, including a
tune by Clarke featuring him
and the guitarist on vocals, al-
beit somewhat innoccuous vo-
cals.

success. Before the show, peek-
ing out from under a blue beret
pulled down low over his fore-
head, Corea explained his
change in style which has made
his music popular:
"The thing that we're all
striving for is a balance be-
tween reaching lots of different
kinds of people and not losing
our artistic integrity. If an ar
tist just creates something out
of his own universe and doesn't

.

The
stic
mem
DiMe
black
ed th
bums
stint
and t
Foreu
As

group played a long acou- intend to communicate, he
number with especially won't reach many people,"
torable solos by Corea and DiMeola's sound on his acous-
ola. Pounding on Hill's tic Ovation guitar was reminis-
grand piano, Corea evok- ;cent of John McLaughlin's on
he feelings of the solo al- the album I Goal's Beyond.
he recorded between his But DiMeola carried the pure,.
with the Miles Davis band nimle sound to a more com-
he formation of Return to plex extreme, executing ex-
ver. tremely difficult chordal ar-
an acoustic pianist, Corea rangements with seasoned tech-
't much of a commercialInique.

And as Clarke rode up and
down to the highest and low-
est notes he can coax out of his
electric bass the quality of the

Doilv Photo By PAULINE LUBENS
Everything's just plucky
Veteran folk singer Mike Seeger plays the autoharp during part of his performance at the
Ark last night. Seeger, one of the great urban-style folk singers from the fifties, demon-
strated remarkable flexibility on a wide variety of instruen nts, including the guitar, fiddle,
mandolin, and banjo.
Tryouts for ~'Gr*e test Show'
promote the c'irc-,us dream

i

of a rack & roll bana . ney'r i u oreatecmoe: v . , "'4-.yW l i a
eectric and loud enough to But now Corea, the composer sound changed: at the low ex- wasn
threaten the health of ear of most of the group's tunes, treme, the timbre was pure
treatenthe'rethtetho arhas gone slightly more lax in and resonant, akin to that of
drums, they're tighter than a his dictation of the details in a vintage upright. But at the
kimono, and when they're funky Return to Forever's perform- n other extreme, the tone was
they're as funky as Sly Stone. ance, permitting DiMeola to set louda ercing, at ie
The element o cs ylistcei his controls as he prefers. the sound of Bill Wyman's bass
technical: one and all they're But the backbone of the on "Satisfaction."
as proficient as the front lines
of the oldbEllington bands, or
the members of the Parker-
Gillespie - Monk combos climb- HELD OVER WITH LOVE
ing up and down all the scales l in 1500 Theatres Nationwide.
and modes fast as anyonecan, It was Historys first 3 day standing ovation!.
and seemingly effortlessly. the country's wild about "Harry..!
From their first number,
"Vulcan Worlds" off the album
Where Have I Known You Be-
fore?, the show consisted almost
completely of rockers.
Corea blasted off behind his
keyboards, conducting the rhy-
thm with the shrugging of his
shoulders, occasionally blowing
out a globe of the Bazooka bub-
ble gum he was chewing, smirk-
ing like a cocky kid. His melo-
Highlights9090dJEpresents

By CATHI SUYAK
Special To The Daily
DETROIT-You don't have to
be a small child to want toI
run away and join the circus-
to want to ride elephants, wear
sequined tights and fly through
the air with the greatest of ease.
When Ringling Brothers-Bar-
num and Bailey Circus held
chorus auditions at Olympia
Stadium here last week, 25
young women showed up to ap-
ply for a chance at stardom in
the center ring of the Greatest
Show on Earth.I
"I'm ready to get out of
modeling," said Jan Ricca, one
of the aspirants. "If I can get
the chance to travel and dance
at the same time, I'll grab it.j
I love to meet people, and here
you meet all kinds-clowns,
acrobats and dancers."
Sandy Jacobowitz, currently a
secretary for a Detroit radio
station, said that "traveling and
elephants" made circus work at-
tractive to her.
Each of Ringling's 20 show
girls receives $190 a week to
dance, ride horses and ele-
phants, and work on the high
wires. They must pay for their
own food and transportation ($10
a week for a berth on the circus
train).
C i r c u s choreographer Bill
Bradley told the chorus appli-
cants that he was looking for
"personality, dance ability and
a sense of adventure." After
leading the would-be performers
through several routines, Brad-
ley and his assistants chose 12
finalists, who may be called
when vacancies occur in the
dance troupe to attend a train-
ing course at Rinaling's winter
home in Venice, Fla. The class
orients new performers to high
wire work.
Crush
all smokes
dead out.

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But finalist Jacobowitz seemed
unwilling to work on the ropes.
"I just won't go up there," she
said, glancing nervously at the
thin wire susoended far above
the stadium floor. "If I have
to, I know I'll fall."
Circus girl Antoinette Sokolow-
ska agreed that life under the
big top isn't all fun and glamor.
Injuries sustained during a per-;
formance are covered by the
circus' insurance, she said, but
all other illnesses and dental
work come out of the perform-'

er's pocket.
"You renew your contract
every year," she pointed out.'
"If they don't like you, you I
don't get a contract, and they
don't tell you why."
Yet despite the hardships of
a show business life, the circus'
veterans and the applicants all
seemed enthusiastic about the
work. The circus still insmresF
dreams for adults as well as
children-and for a few Detroit;
area women, that dream is now
one step closer to reality.

a-n. IIeI 1 U U
TUESDAY
Take Kerr tips off apartment
dwellers with a few tips to keep'
you alive at 6:55 this morning
on channel 7. This afternoon,
Mrs. Drysdale's father visits j
from Boston on The Beverly'
Hillbillies on channel 9 at 4:30
f o l l o w e d by the ever-jolly
Mickey Mouse Club. If dinner
turned your stomach, watch The
Brady Bunch at 6 on channel 50 1
-or again at 7 on channel 11.
Elsewhere, escape from reality
for a half hour with Monty Py-
thon's Flying Circus at 11 on
channel 56.
WEDNESDAY
It's a good day to sleep in
right through until Thurs-
day. Rita 'dell's Prize Movie
this morning features Judy Gar-
land in I Could Go On Singing,
on channel 7 at 9. At 4:15 you
can catch the Three Stooges in
Quiz Wiz on channel 50. If you
think that's bad, don't miss
When Things Were Rotten at 8

L

as Harry S. Truman in
GIVE 'EM ELL,
T hNAn NOA r
NO WAAIABLEO
NITEOAArS H x 'Trh.nirnlor'

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SHOWTIMES: MONDAY-FRIDAY 7:00 & 9:00 ,fiNG~ALCA'i(Gf E,SP2FEL~\ /EDOCTO5ERISTh.6PM~t
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Please: help prevent forest fires.
ADVERTISI NO
IN THE
MICHIGAN
DAILY
DOESN'T.
COST...
IT PAYS

Daiy Potoby EN INK onR channel ~7. Finally, Johnny
On} o heaplcatsfry ps o hotgongbrothers-NK Carson celebrates his 13th an-
One f te apliantsfora pst n te Riglig Bothrs- niversary as host of the Tonight
Barnum and Bailey Circus chorus line grins while trying a Show with a two hour retrospec-
bareback ride on one of the Greatest Show on Earth's leg- tive special at 11:30 on channel
endary pachyderms. 4
TICKETS GO OAN SALE TODAY
Concert Co-op Presents
S i,
o i, "
4 fir ?, " ' {
IN
I & INAfsi .:;.

GO DUTCH!

i

JEAN MARTINON, THE HAGUE PHILHARMONIC, and T H E FESTIVAL
CHORUS of 100 singers begin our 97th season, combining their artistic talents for a
most rewarding evening of musical enjoyment A festive "Dutch Treat" buffet supper
at 6 o'clock will precede the concert-call our Burton Tower office for reservation
inform atio)n.
PROGRAM
SAINT-SAENS: Symphony in A major
STRAVINSKY: Symphony of Psalms
NIELSEN: Symphony No. 4 ("The Inextinguishable")
Concert on Sunday evening, October 5, in Hill Auditorium at 8:30
TICKETS available from $3.50 to $8.50

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