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September 17, 1975 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-17

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Wedmesdoy, September 17, 1 975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wedr'~esdoy, September 17, 1 ~75 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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SCULPTURE EXHIBITION

Indoor,

outdoor art dazzles

By LISA BAYLIS
Sculpture has a special gift
for timeless communication: in
an actual three - dimensional
form, the sculptor attempts to
render a tangible conception of
life as he knows it.
Last night, the School of Art's
Museum opened its First In-
vitational Sculpture Exhibition,
an indoor and outdoor gathering
of works by university students
and professors. It is the first
exhibition of its kind at the Art
School's Museum.
And although there is one
minor problem with the exhibi-
tion-a lack of comprehensive-
ness-and one major one-no
refreshments-the total impact'
created by the works in the in-
door/outdoor setting is extraor-
dinary.
Perhaps the East Court dis-
plays some of the collection's
finest works using the most
logical f o r m: environmental
sculptures.
University professor and ex-
hibition organizer Gerome Kam-
rowski has fashioned a beautiful
and kinetic "tree-like" sculp-
ture, "Marvelous Freedom of
the Winds." As the title sug-
gests, the work captures the
movement of the breeze using
shimmering metallic streamers
which twirl harmoniously in the
surroundings.
Western Michigan University'ss
Gerald Dumlao demonstrates a
keen sense for the use of ma-
terials in his outdoor work.
Made of cast terazzo cement

and stainless steel, the relatively
small piece allows us to feel
the ton that it actually weighs.
The result is strong,, yet re-
fined, and much more monu-
mental than its 5' x 4' x 2' size
would imply.
Viewing the First Invitational
Sculpture Exhibition's outdoor
section is an exhiliarating ex-
perience; the indoor work has
somewhat lesser of an impact.
Professor Tom McClure's floorI
piece "Taurus Rising" towers
over the viewers, threatening to
engulf them into a strange and
sensual world of aluminum.
Of the hanging sculptures,
Lee Haner's "Ostrich Danger
Piece" is perhaps the best. It
seems to strike a fine balance of
tensions and in a way states of
being.
Other interesting works in-
clude Jay Yager's "The Acme
Infinity Bracket"-in one sense
an enjoyable game, yet in an-
other, a provocative mind piece.
And last but not least, Bob
Caskey's "From Amanda withj
Love." The work consists of a
wooden plate on a pedestal with
31 cents, a dog tag and a fifty
dollar bill placed on a red felt
liner.
The exhibition as a whole is
highly commendable. Let's hope
the response shown the first
night continues, for as the Art
School's Dean Bayliss says,j
"Many students and visitors who
will view the exhibition will
heighten their regard for Ameri-
can sculpture."

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BRIA W O DiMLL I~O n oth .'~Sta s "te oad:Ei t):f a t:', ,"

Daily Photo by GORDON TUCKER
In sculptures such as Marvelous Freedom of the Winds, the
artist attempts to formulate something that is natural, but
which also comments upon nature. One can experience such
freedom in the East Court of the School of Art's Museum.
Nugent, Dukes
rock Chances Are
By ROB MEACHUM
It was a homecoming of sorts when Ted Nugent and
the Amboy Dukes rocked Chances Are into a frenzy on
Monday night - the Dukes haven't played Ann Arbor for
a couple of years now, and considering Ann Arbor is where
the band is originally from, it wasn't too surprising to see
the amazing display of raw energy and power from the first
song until the last.
One good aspect about Chances Are is that big name
rock and roll bands who could never hope to fill Crisler
Arena can be heard (and in this case, seen) in a setting
close to the audience and where the sound doesn't rever-
berate half a dozen times off the walls.
Nugent, the lead guitarist and vocalist who must be
over 30 by now, put on a show of pure, unadulterated raunch
-the likes of which never make the airwaves these days.
He is probably one of the best at what he does, surpassing
Aerosmith and Mahogany Rush and, though I've yet to see
them in concert, coming close to the Blue Oyster Cult type
of gutsy, tight rock and roll.
The Dukes as a supporting band were generally lack-
luster except for the other guitarist who frequently traded
leads with Nugent while never ceasing to dance and jump
around the stage.
Notwithstanding, a decent guitarist in his own right was
over-shadowed by not only the wild-haired Nugent but also
the fact that his wattage was barely audible, something
the roadies should have tended to, but didn't.
They played almost exclusively new material, songs
that will appear on their next album to be released next
week. Gone were tunes like Journey to the Center of the
Mind - replacing them were Just What the Doctor Wanted
and Motor City Madhouse, the latter of which was the most
wild, had-hitting, raucous R & R number that I've heard
in quite some time. At one point, Nugent screamed at the
top of his lungs into the microphone - and coupled with a
wailing guitar note at the same pitch - caused the P.A.
system to feed-back at ear splitting levels. Johnny B. Goode
was done just well, even if Nugent failed miserably at try-
ing to imitate Hendrix.

.

A liwl& 1M tVAM"rr

Have a fli r for
artistic writing u
If you are interest H M (
oet, ad music MASS MEETING
drb, t TOMORROW N I
Editor, THURSDAY, SEP"
Michigan Daiy. IN SPECIAL EVE?
2nd FLOOR, UN!

IGH
T. 18
NTS
ION

Daily Photo by GORDON TUCKER
e, a despairing young man bows reverently before the
it sculpture deities . . . or perhaps, here a joyous young
i finally finds his home. It's all open to interpretation at the
t Invitational Sculpture Exhibition, which will continue on
ugh the month of September.
TODAY at 1:30 & 8:00
All seats for first show-$1.00
WINNER OF 6 ACADEMY AWARDS!
ACAJ.FiI O11 FWL7CIV.W
- DAVID LEAN'SHILM
DOCPORAJ
ZHMAGO'W
ING I. university
T,
8, AT 7:00 P.M. TODAYat1-3-5-79 .
OFFICE OF UAC Until 5 p.m.-aft seots $1.00
A cross between
Love Story and
LastTango In Parisi"
---Playboy Ma'* azrne
EER CHUGGINGI
,NTEST
'ARADE!
A N CE fistributed by CINEMATWON INDU$TRIWE
'RICYCLE RACE
D ROLLING CONTEST j231 south state,
GG TOSS
AGAZINE 5 TA E
RRY--763-1 107 _________
RY-73-1107The atre Phone 642-6264
1:00-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:20
12th SMASH WEEK I
ROY SCHEIDER
RICHARD DREYFUSS
ROBERT SHAW in
(1974

If you are
interested in
learning
elementary
Yiddish, there is a1
class being formed.
Call HILLEL
663-3336
- l

-- EVENTS
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GRAPHYCONTEST 0 Pi
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CONTEST E" E
"OM
or CALL RICHARD SHER

Probably not..All things considered you do
what you do pretty doggone well. After all, no one
has taken your job. And you're eating regularly.
But...
But have you ever considered what doing your
job just a little better might mean?
Money. Cold hard coin of the realm.
If each of us cared just a smidge more about
what we do for a living, we could actually turn that
nflationary spiral around. Better products, better
service and better management would mean savings
for all of us. Savings of much of the cash and frayed
nerves it' costing us now for repairs and inefficiency.
Point two..By taking more pride in our work
we'll more than likely see Americaregainng its
strength in the competitive world trade arena. When
the balance of payments swings our way again we'll
all be better off economically.

I CAMPUS PREMIERE
HEARTS and MINDS

So you see-the only person who can really

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