100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 13, 1975 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4
3oturdoy, September 13, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Saturday, September 13, 1975 THE MiCHIGAN DAILY

Ford halts investigation, fears
disclosure of classified words

CA __ kvpIt_ en'ice4

WASHINGTON OP) - Presi-
dent Ford told the House Intel- I
ligence Committee yesterday he
wants it to return secret infor-
mation supplied by the Adminis-
tration because four classified
words. that could cripple U.S.
foreign policy were made public.
The President also warned
the committee that it would re-
ceive no more material from
U.S. intelligence agencies unless
it agreed to clear through the
Pesticidal us
to record pri
(M) - Despite the cries of en-
vironmentalists and the cam-
paigns of organic food fanciers,
American farmers are using
more pesticides than ever be-
fore to grow the crops that nour-
ish the nation.
The latest available figures
from the U.S. Department of
Agriculture show that almost 1.2
billion pounds of synthetic or-
ganic pesticides worth $1.3 bil-
lion were sold in the United
States in 1973. That represented
an increase of 17.4 per cent from
the previous year.
Statistics for 1974 are not yet
available, but the figures are ex-
pected to show another gain, al-
though the energy crisis probab-
ly will cut any increase since
the organic pesticides generally
are derived from petroleum.
IN 1966, according to the
USDA, 36 per cent of all crop-
land, not counting pasture, was
treated with pesticides. In 1971,
the amount of treated cropland
rose to 52 per cent.
The individual increases for
some major food crops are even
greater. In 1966, 67 per cent of
the acreage used to grow corn
was treated with pesticide; five
years later, 83 per cent was
treated.
The amount of treated soy-
bean acreage rose from 30 to 72
per cent; the amount of treated

Administration all information
to be made public.
The committee's investigation'
into U.S. intelligence activities
came to an immediate halt.
ASKED if the President's ac-
tion would close down the com-
mittee's operations, Chairman
Otis Pike, (D-N.Y.), said, "It
certainly does temporarily.
There is no way on earth you
can investigate the intelligence
activities of the United States of
" s

America without access to clas-
sified information." UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
Pike said the committee will THE NAZARENE
not return the classified infor- 409 N. Division
mation to Ford until committee M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
members meet next week to Church School-9:45 a.m.
plan their course of action. Morning Worship-11:00 a.
Asst. Atty. Gen. Rex Lee de- Evening Worship--7:00 p.r
livered the President's message * **

I
tJ(

i.m.
m.

CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. Division-665-0606
Sundays at noon-Holy Eucha-
rist with a meal following.
* * *
ANN ARBOR SOCIETY
OF FRIENDS (QUAKER)
Welcomes visitors to Worship
at 10:00 at 1416 Hill Street.
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Pastor: Don Postema
Christian Reformed Worship.
Sunday Worship-10 a.m. and;

to the House committee. He said
the President's action was
prompted by disclosure of four
words which were contained in
reports on intelligence about
the 1973 Middle East war.
THE REPORTS indicated U.S.

AP Photo
"Flour" power
A flour bomb erupts on London's Home Secretary Roy Jenkins
as he addressed a public meeting Thursday night. Angry
women at the meeting threw the bombs in protest of Jenkins'
new race relations proposals.
NEW BEGINNING:
Woman leaves city
life to dir for old

e ciJ.I1IJ1 intelligence a en:cieswere
caught by surprise by the out-
break of the war.
o o rtions Lee did not say what the four
words were.
BUT LEE said the four words
wheat acreage went from 30 to in disiute were released by the
47 per cent. The next USDA stu- committee without intelligence
dy is not due until 1976, but gov- official's agreement. The words,
ernment spokesmen estimate he said. could irreparably harm
that 90 per cent or more of the Ford's conduct of foreign policy.
corn acreage and about 80 per "The president's responsibil-
cent of the soybean acreage is ity for the national security of
treated with a pesticide of one the United States leaves him no
type or another. alternative but to request the
THE controversy over pesti- immediate return of all classi-
cides began in the early 1960s field information previously pro-
pollowing the publication of "Si- vided this committee," Lee said.
lent Spring," by Rachel Carson
in which the author, who died in **'*****
1964, linked the use of some pes- Daily Official Bulletin
ticides to cancer.
Some consumer groups argued m "
that there was not enough infor- Saturday, September 13
mation available about the Day Calendar
chemicals that wind up in our WUOM: From the Midway-I. Dr.
K. L. White, Johns Hopkins,
food andadvoatedorgaic Health & Health Care: Personal &
farming, growing crops without Public Issues;" IL I. V. Pustovoy,
artificial aids. USSR Ministry of Health Care,
Most of the publicity about 'Health Care Planning in the So-
pesticides has centered on five et Union," 10 am; 10th anniver-
p sary comnmemmoration, death of Ed-
well-known chemicals banned by ward R. Murrow, 1 pm.
the Environmental Protection Football: UM vs. Wisc., broad-
Agency-DDT, Aldrin, Dieldrin, cast live from Madison, WUOM,
heptachlor and chlordane. 91.7 MHz, 2:15 pm.
Planetarium: Nova Cygnt 19'79,
"THEY ARE poisons," the audience - requested topics, Exhibit
EPA spokesman said. "There's museum, 3 pm.
no getting around it. They are
hazardous and must be handled THE MICHIGAN DAILY
with care." The pesticides ap- volume LXXXVI, No. 9
pear to be here to stay. The saturday, September 13, 1975
biggest surge in the use of pes- is edited and managed by students
ticides came in the late 1940s at the University of Michigan. News
and earl 1950s with the devel- phone 764-0562. Second class postage
early1-paidat Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
opment of new chemicals. Published d a 11 y Tuesday through
,unday___morninga...auring . es I-TT11vor-

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
State at Huron and Washington
Worship Services:
Chapel-8:30 a.m: - Commun-
ion Service.
Sanctuary-9:30 a.m.-In Sanc-
tuary.t
Sanctuary - 11:00 a.m. - In
Sanctuary.
Sermon: "The Voice of Exper- ;
ience" by Dr. Donald B. Strobe.
Worship service is broadcast
over WNRS-AM (1290) each
Sunday from 11:00 to 12:00.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
Sunday, Sept. 14:
5:30 p.m.-Orientation Picnic,
Wesley lawn and lounge.
Monday, Sept. 15:
7:30 p.m.-Grad Student and
Young Adult Group II-Wesley{
Lounge.
Wednesday, Sept. 17:
7:30 p.m.-A new group for
divorced and separated people-
Wesley Lounge.
Thursday, Sept. 18:
. 7:00-8:30 a.m.-Breakfast Club
for undergraduates, Pine Room.
7:30 p.m.-Graduate Students
and Young Adults Group I-Wes-
ley Lounge.
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
(Formerly Lutheran Student
Chapel)
801 S. Forest Ave. at Hill St.
Gordon Ward, Pastor
Sunday Service at 10:30 a.m.
* * *
ANN ARBOR CHURCH
OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west of
U of M Stadium)
Bible Study - Sunday, 9:30
a.m.-Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m.
and 6:00 p.m.
Need Transportation? C a 11
662-9928.
dancing 0
HEAD WIND Q
AT THE
Xgoden7 acon
APPEARING
-a Friday & Saturday -
314 S. FOURTH (
(Near Liberty)
=->0<-=>o<=>0<=>0c<->0

6 p.m.
S * * *
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Service and Sunday
School-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meet-
ing-8:00 p.m.
Child Care-Sunday, under 2
years; Wednesday, through 6
Midweek Informal Worship.
years.
Reading Room - 306 E. Lib-
erty, 10-9 Mon., 10-5 Tues.-Sat.
* * *
ST. ANDREW'S EPSICOPAL
CHURCH, 306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
10:00 a.m. - Morning Prayer
and Sermon.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149
Minister: Orval L. E. Wllimann
9:00 a.m.-Chapel Service.
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.
10:00 a.m.-Church School.
Child care at 10:00 a.m. serv-
lice.

ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0S57
Weekend Masses:
Saturday-5 p.m.
Sunday. - 7:45 a.m., 9 a.m.,
10:30 a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
(plus 9:30 a.m. North Campus).
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave. 663-5560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:30 a.m.
-Worship Services.
Sunday at 9:15 a.m."--Bible
Study Group.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m. -
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at
YM-YWCA, 530 S, Fifth
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome.
For information or transpor-
tation: 663-3233 or 662-2494.
10:00 a.m. - Sunday Worship
Service.
* * *
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers
9:30 a.m.-Church School.
5:30 p.m.-Student Supper.
10:30 a.m.-Morning Worship.

Try

Daily
C lassifieds

LONE PINE, Calif. ()-Jen-
nifer Roy's gold mining shack'
wouldn't compete with homes
in the exclusive neighborhood
where she used to live, but it
;has a crystal chandelier and
wall-papered outhouse.

tain.
"Jenny puts her makeup on
when she goes to dynamite,"
quips Carl Sylvis, 54, a Paiute-
Sioux Indian who is a combina-
tion guard and Jack-of-all-trades
at the mine. He lives down the
road in a trailer.
IN THE last few years, she
says she has "found out how
tough miners really are. It"s
still the Old West around here."

Service broadcast
(1290 AM).

on WNRS

"No reason you can't
style and be a miner
same time," she says.

live in
at the

i
3
3

Bhestory
Buford Pusser waned told...

Her mine - she calls it the
Golden Lady - is "a far cry
from the city," she admits.
Three mining shacks on the east
slope of 11,125-foot Keynot Peak,
200 miles south of here, are
nothing like the section of Long
Beach where she lived before
she ended her 25-year marriage
in divorce four years ago.
"NEVER had anything except
the refined life before coming
here," she said. "Never met
people like I've met the last
three years. Guess I shouldn't
say that too loud."
Her two children, now grown
and married, were "aghast," at
her decision to live here,
scratching for gold and silver on
the side of a rock. But she says,
"Instead of my life coming to
an end, I wanted to begin again
with something totally differ-
ent."
"I ABOUT gave up my first
night here. There was the pitter-

Union leader might be jailed

( ') - Some one million NewI
York school children remainedj
out of classes yesterday as the'
focus of the city's teacher strike
moved from the bargaining
table to a court hearing that
could result in the jailing of the
leader of the striking teacher's
!union.
Hundreds of thousands of oth-
er youngsters were also out of
school as teacher strikes con-
tinued in Chicago and smaller'
cities across the nation. For
some, the end of a second week
of extended summer vacation
was approaching.
In New York, the action shift-
ed to the courtroom after bar-
gaining, which has been mired

Federation of Teachers. The salary raise for the 27,000 teach-
teachers' strike is illegal under ers, who made from $10,400 to
the state Taylor law prohibiting $20,996 under the old contract.
public employe strikes. Their demands have not been
The immediate effect of the made public.
order was unclear. It could re- TEACHERS' strikes also con-
sult in the jailing of UFT Presi- tinued in Wilmington, Del.; San
dent Albert Shanker. He has Jose and Berkeley, Calif.; Lynn
been jailed twice in the past for and NewtBedford, Mass.; and
leading teacher strikes, but each communities in Washington,
time he served his sentence aft- Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Ohio,
er the strike had concluded. Rhode Island and New York
A major question in the New State.
York dispute was whether some
$43 million earmarked for teach-
ers' raises but "frozen" in the
budget crisis could be freed to THERE WILL BE A
rehire laid-off teachers and re- PHI ETA SIGMA I
duce clas size, a demand of the I
65,000 striking teachers.

Suda orin urngte Uier
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Anr
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area):
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio).
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.50 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50-,non-
local mail (other states and foreign).
CHARING CROSS
BOOKSHOP
Used, Fine and Scholarly Books
316 S. STATE-994-4041
Ooen Mon.-Fri. 10-8,
Sat. 10-6

PARTB

N

Showtimes: Mon.-Sct. 7, 9
Sun. 5, 7, 9

-,rr,,,.-GUIANCE-,S, . T~

v.. .___________

I
I

.

patter all night of hundreds of in the city's fiscal crisis, broke SALARIES were not a major
tiny feet on the floor. That was down about 6 a.m. and teachers issue in New York. Teachers, at DELHI PARK
my introduction to pack rats continued on picket lines beyond who earned from $9,700 to $20,-
and mice. an 8 a.m. deadline for the end 350 last year, eased a demand Members - Meet at Prof.
Her shack is lighted by kero- of the strike set by a state Su- for a 25 per cent wage increase Hornbeck's house, 1717 S.
sene lanterns and heater by a preme Court justice. amid the fiscal tangle, which Frisbees, Softbatls, Mits,
wood stove, but she has spruced JUSTICE Irving Saypol said has resulted in a $231 million etc. If it rains on Sat., Pic-
it up with a player piano, crys- after the deadline that he was cut in the school budget. nic will be moved to Sunday
tal chandelier, stained glass prepared to sign a contempt of In Chicago, bargaining con- with some arrangements.
window and a large rock foun- court order against the United tinued with the major issue a
This is a Picture
E of ANDY WARHOL
He is sitting at a table. His arm'
rests on the table. He is support-
ing his head in his hand. He is I 1
having fun. <~«>
HEISAT
Centicorer
Bookshops
c aP
MONDAY,SEPT.15
11:30-3:00 P.M.Q
Come to Centicore and Rap
& s
with ANDY WARHOL
H e'll talk to you about anything from (Campbell's) Soup to (Joe D'AI-
lessandro's) Nuts. He also might try to sell you a copy "THE PHILOSO-
PHY OF ANDY WARHOL" From A to B and Back Again $7.95. And auto- .t
Q graphed by the master.4

10
Al
*/
'/
~D
(AA

Cottagje
INN

OLDEST PIZZA IN TOWN (Oldest Pizzeria in Ann Arbor)
PIZZA & 3 EGG OMELETTES
Pizza - (Small 1.95, Medium 2.65, Large 3.00 )

Western Omelettes 2.25

Omelettes 1Item -1.75

Pizza with choice of extra items below (sm. .35, med. .55,1Ig. .65 per
Omelettes (.25 per extra item)

Green Peppers
Onions Ham
Ground Beef
DINNERS

Pepperoni Mushrooms
Cheese Italian Sausage
Anchovies Bacon

Oz. Club Steak
Ln Beef Shish Kebab
2 Fried Spring Chicken
2 B.B.Q. Chicken
eep Fried Shrimp
ied Filet of Sole
(Shrimp & Filet of Sole
served with Corn on the Cob)

4.25
2.75
2.45
2.45
3.45
3.45

[1 Dinners Served with Cottage Fries
ossed Salad and Fresh Vienna Bread
SANDWICH BOARD
)n Toast, White or Rye)

1/3 LB. HAMBURG
1. Plain
2. With Bacon
3. With Cheese
4. With Mushroom
5. With Crumbled Blue Chees
6. With Cheddar Cheese
7. C.I.B.
with all of the above
8. 1/2 Lb. Ground Round
with Cottage Fries
ITALIAN DINNE
Spagetti
Mostaccioli
Seashells
Choice of: Meat Sauce
Clam Sauce
Mushroom Sau
With Meat Balls, or Italian
Sausage .
Ravioli with choice of sauce
Veal Barbazon

item)
~ERS
1.15
1.30
1.30
1.30
e 1.30
1.30
1.45
1.75
1.95
ERS
2.45
2.45
2.45
ce
65 extra
2.75
3.25
3.25

r
W
(loot
00
e,

(o

Ham & Cheese
Bacon, Lettuce & Tomato
Meat Ball Sandwich
Italian Sausage
with Red Sauce
Submarine
Steak Sandwich
Fried Fish Sandwich

1.35
1.25
1.25
1.60
1.60
2.25
1.25

with side of spagetti
Veal & Peppers
with side of spagetti

- - - ----------
------------ M-m- -M-M-M-M-M-M-

512 East William
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Telephone: 663-3379

V eai rFrancaise I
with side of spagetti 3.25
Italian Dinners served with Tossed

J

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan