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September 11, 1975 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursdoy, "Septtmb r 11, 1975

I Ht MI(;HK3AN UAILY

Page give

Thrsa, etebr 1,175It.III.A N AL ~aer

I

Stripper

seeks

G-r

By CATHI SUYAK
"I've always wanted to get into
something G-rated," quipped Lorelei
Lee, hopefully but nervously, as she
waited to be called on to dance. "And
just think - maybe now I'll have a G-
rating instead of a G-string."
The annual auditions for the Ring-
ling Brothers-Barnum and Bailey cir-
cus chorus line offered Lorelei hope for
a new career. But she knew the pro-
bable result. She had attended many
simnlar tryouts elsewhere, and the ver-
dict was always the same: no one
wanted to hire for a regular acting
job a performer who had spent the
last few years as one of a leading
burlesque stripper.
"I've been on the road for the last
ten years. And whatever city I'm in,
working in some nasty local burlesque

theater, I go to all the legitimate play
auditions," she said.
"But they always look at me and
say 'What are you doing here? What
kind of place do you think this is, any-
how? A burlesque girl doesn't dance in
our nice place!"'
Consequently, she decided to join the
queue at Detroit's Olympia Stadium,
waiting for a brief moment in the Bar-
num and Bailey center ring-waiting
for that slim chance to be discovered.
Thirty other women were competing
with her for an opportunity to ride ele-
phants, wear gaudy costumes, and fly
through the air with the greatest of
ease.
"I love the circus. These are beau-
tiful, fantastic people," she said. "Just
think of the people I'll be working
with- I've worked with belly dancers,

strip tease artists, and a lot of them
are bad. Well, some of them are OK,
but here I'll be around folks I'm sure
are good."
She paused. "I'm getting on in
years. I'm 27 years old. I've got to
start wearing more costume. I just
hope they're looking for my 5-foot-7
height, blonde hair, and blue eyes."
She seemed tired of the bump-and-
grind world of burlesque. "Burlesque
is a dying art. It's getting too raun-
chy," she said. She stated that strip-
pers are paid well, "but it's practically
nothing after paying for all your own
transportation and costumes."
And travel on the burlesque circuit is
far from glamorous. "You might get
into Detroit when it's zero degrees out-
side, and you've got on the things you
were wearing in Houston. You're freez-

ting
ing out there at six in the morning,
just shivering like a nut.
"I've arrived in bus stations at 3
a.m. and had to walk ten miles to the
theatre or motel where I was staying.
The agency would say 'Oh, it's right
around the corner', but it would be
three miles away. I'd walk and walk,
dragging my footlockers and every-
thing else."
But Lorelei never heard from Ring-
ling Brothers after the audition. In-
stead, she was fired from her job at
a Detroit burlesque house because she
skipped a performance to attend the
circus tryouts.
"They blew their big chance," she
s-id, oiietlv, and prepared to pack her
footlork. r to once again return to the
hbrlesane tour - still hoping, perhaps,
for gnother chance at a G-rating.

Paste this inside
your medicine cabinet.
1 Cances*
sevei wamaig'I
* signals
1 1. Change in bowel or
I bladder habits.
I.2.Asorethatdoes not 1
1. heal.-
13. Unusual bleeding or 1
1 discharge.
I4.Thickeningorlump
1 in breastorelsewhere.
I 5. Indigestion or difficulty I
I in swallowing. 1
1 6. Obviouschange in 1
I wart ormole..
7. Nagging cough or1
hoarseness. I
1If you have a warningsignal,l
1 see yotrdoctor. I
1 American
Cancer Society 1.
THSSPD " O. ' P0'TCDB EP Br 1 ' SiE

classroom nstUC
electronic muSiC
the i
ifyu at ocraestudio
fyou want to create electronic music, our
2-week course is meant for you. Learn how to
use a synthesizer, operate tape recorders and
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Classes are small and individual attention is
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CAMPUS FLICKS:
Right-wing Milius takes

t

555 e. william

994-5404

audience

By JAMES VALK
In the golden days of yester-
year, "when movies were mov-
ies" as Ross Hunter would say,
the epic spectacle was a stand-
ard option open to any film-
maker (they were movie direc-
tors then) who had the resourc-
es of a major studio to finance
the project.
Today, however, with the ma-
jor studio operation on a slight-
ly different perspective, the
spectacle as it was once known
has all but vanished.
That's not to say that very
expensive movies aren't mde
anymore. Quite the contrary,
as Earthquake, Towering In-
ferno and Airport 1975 all had
generous budgets that were un-
grudgingly approved by the stu-
dio brass.
Yet this spectacle today is
not one of grandeur but rather
one of disaster - movies that
depend not so much on lavish
scenery as they do extravagant
sets, tending to place undue
emphasis on watery plotlines
and pitiful characterizations.
That is generally the prevail-
ing rule-of-thumb for motion
picture production today-a rule
that has been almost exclusive-
lv followed in the past few
years. But, surprise - Holly-
wood's enfant terrible John Mi-
lius, a very interesting right-
wing near-fascist filmmaker
has sprung The Wind and the
Lion on the world, an unbeliev-
ably simple yet effective tale
of quasi-terrorism in the days
of Teddy Roosevelt .
The plot, like in most spec-
tacles, is not really important,
as the visuals are enough to
carry one through the entire
epic without flinching.
To actually make a movie of
these proportions and get the
money to do it, is a feat I
have no accounting for. But Mi-
lius is a strange and talented
gent who evidentally has as
many good friends as he has
hard-core enemies.
A noted admirer of King
Chump himself, John Wayne,
Milius is despised by what he
terms the "liberal" critics, no-
tably his running battle with
the New Yorker's Pauline Kael.
Current he is working on a
right-wing thriller that will sup-
posedly "be so far out" it will
more than off balance Costa
Gavras' Z, while at the same
time is co - scripting Francis
Ford Coppola's $10 million epic
Apocalypse Now.
This one deals with the Amer-
ican involvement in Vietnam,
and was started some eight
ADVERTISING
IN THE
MICHIGAN
DAILY
DOESN'T
COST . 9

IT PAYS

i
r

s back into time
years ago as a vehicle for Cop- The one sole reason The Wind
pola's now defunct American and the Lion is worth anyone's
Zoetrope, the primary starting time is the dazzling cinematog-
point for George Lucas (THX- raphy of Billy Williams and the
1138, American Graffiti). epic scale on which the entire
This of course, does not ex- effort is orchestrated.
Tthe evolution of The Wind: here is no pretension here
and the Lion,.but then, noth- (or none worth worrying about),"
ing does. In fact, there appears and the final shot of the blaz-
to be no sequence whatsoever ing sun with the silhouetted
in the patterns that director shadow of Sean Connery in the'
Milius follows. toforeground is exquisite.
Obviously, his admiration of Where I just about lost my
Teddy Roosevelt's "take no dinner when I saw basically
crap" policy was an influence the same shot at the end of'
cra .iy was a ence Russell's Tommy, here at least
on his decision to make the I know it had a purpose in the
film, but don't let any of the film: that's the way a spectac-
bland scripting get in your way. le has to end.
Why not join the DAILY?
THE DAILY IS A GREAT PLACE TO:

Michigan Daily

PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM announces the
in the POWER CENTER for the performing arts

CLASSES BEGIN THIRD WEEK OF SEPTEMBER

U

WED - SUN NOVEMBER 26 Al

®i

th anaror ilmcoprtie

i

WED - SUN OCTOBER 8-12
featuring
William Leach
Gurest Artist-in-Residence
Mw t eac h appeared as Cyrano de Bergerac in last season's
Gu~est~ Artist Seriss He comes from the Asolo State Theatre
ofnt rda.

peopl
Pe ited:
Theymut
narew way.

\\
ICI ', 1i1
i I i;i
%
_ ,
.....a -=='..

WED - SUN NOVEMBER 26-30
by William Shakespeare
Directed by
Nicholas Pennell
Guest Artist-in-Residence
Mr. Pennell returns to Ann
Arbor alter another season
wsith Stratford Fea'.ivalTheatre
at anada. He eaed as
Per Je last season.

'f

!I
!l

meet other good people
drink 5c Cokes
learn the operations of a1
write stories
see your name in print
earn a little money

newspaper

:.j
..

Come on down to 420 Maynard anytime and
join the business, news, sports or photography
staffs!

I

KEN RUSSELL'S FILM OF
D. H. LAWRENCE'S
"WOMEN IN LOVE"
COLOR

R

ON

2

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
'Plofessional

~eatie

'PrENT m
PRESENTS

IN THE
POWER CENTER

f

ARTHUR MILLER'S
WED - SAT FEBRUARY 11 14

__/

Do-

CARROLL
IN
som
A MUSICAL SPOOF FOR
MYSTERY LOVERS
September 19, 20, 2
All Evenings: 8pr
Sunday Matinee- 3p

.S>;' L.
:4Y :t
}

THREE COINS
"CALL ME IR
"HIGH
and r
A
21
rn, In,
m, wIthe
mt,2

.1
R
H
T1 i
f
eL

-S-
"AGREATDELIGHT . TAP *
DANCING, CHORUS LINES,
PUNCH LINES AND
PRATFALLS" -C.BS.
IN THE FOUNTAIN"
IRESPONSIBLE"
i HOPES''
any more
November 7, 8, 9
Ai Evenings: 8pm
Br ds Sunday Matinee: 3pm
e Bread way ca

Book by Ossie Davis. Y
Philip Rose, and Peter Udell
Music by Gary Geld
Lyrics by Peter Udell
Based on the play " Purlie Victorious" by Ossie Davis
FEATURING A GUEST ARTIS5-lN-RFSIDENCF

INFORMATION
lull Season Subsriptionsareon sale now. Individual shos go on sale Wednesday,
October 1, 1975.
Mail Orders are now being accepted.
PIP Subscription Office is located in lobby of Mendelssohn Theatre Building.
Hours after Labor Day: Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m .1 p.m., 2-5 p.m.
Mail Orders filled in order of receipt.
Subscriber's tickets for all plays will be mailed September 26, 1973. If a stamped,
self-addressed return envelope is not enclosed, tickets will be held for pick-up at
the Ticket Office.
We regret that no refunds can be maae. We will assist you in exchanging tickets
when possible. No tickets exchanged on days of performance. No exchanges
possible until Single Sales begin.

M- k t"1 I a)

1

1 %*)A as lm&l v

1 lq

I

_

JASON R(
Eugene L
LONG DAYS

BR7
)BARDS

AND
SE PT 26 27 &8TH
All Evenings: 8pn
Sunday Matinee: 3p

Feb. 27-29
or April 16-18

SUBSCRIPTION PRICES
40%o Discount for Students
20% Discount for Non-students
we-.Thuts. lve-.
Sat & Sun. Mats.

F6: & sat. Cse

Non-1J-M .1-10 Non. 0-10

U.M
Student

Non-U-M U-M
Student Sludent

-;-

NontU-M
Student

SERIES DATES
A Wed. Eves. at 8 p.m. Oct. 8, Nov. 26, Feb. 11, Apr.7
3 Thurs. Eves. at 8 p.m. Oct. 9, Nov. 27, Feb. 12, Apr.1
C Fri. Eves. at 8 p.m. Oct. 10, Nov. 28, Feb. 13, Apr.S
O Sat. Eves at 8 p.m. Oct. 11, Nov. 29, Feb. 14, Apr. 10
E Matinees at3 p.m. (Sun.) Oct. 12, (Sun.) Nov. 30,
(Sit.) Feb. 14, (Sun.) Apr. 11

Orch. Center 57.30 $10.00 $8.70 $11.60
Orch. Side 5.70 7.60 6.90 9.20
Salc. Cenier Front 6.30 8.40 7.50 10.00

Balc. Rear $ S+de SAO 6.80

6.3 8.8

..I

dl, -

O'Neill's
JOUREl
rT T' l TM"T!f

y
SLr r

o v
- C;cp

Student lD#
Name
Address

GUEST ARTIST SERIES
Srntptiao Mail Order Form
Telephone

L

sitIre

. .. .. 'i ... .

StateP

-pOp de

Please make checks payable to U. of M. Mail e >re,' rtridate which seres you wsh
to Mendelssohn Theatre, Ann Arbor, Mi. ' CANNOT Mix SERIas,

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