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September 11, 1975 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-11

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Thursday, September 11, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Police keep peace
as using continues
in Boston, Louisville

Page Three
THE WEEKENDER
100% Rich, Durable Leather
Introductory Offer $35.95
FFINE LEATHER PRO IMPO
LITTLE THINGS Market Place
N. State Street

By The Associated Press | which they have vowed to re-
The visible presence of police peat each day until the city-
and troops is keeping the peace wide busing program is put to
at desegregated schools in Bos- an end.
ton_ and Lnuisville_ Kv. and a.

11D11, U11U L V AAA1 , .y., AIt IA
non-violent atmosphere appar-
ently is helping pupils to return
to classrooms.
National Guardsmen were still
on hand in Louisville yesterday
as attendance at Jefferson
County schools there increased
for the second straight day.
OFFICIALS in the Louisville-
Jefferson County school system,
the nation's 12th largest, report-
ed that attendance headed for
the highest level since the se-
mester began. It was the city's
fifth day of school desegrega-
tion.!
Motorcycle policesagain pro-
tected buses in Boston as they
rolled into the city's Charles-
town and South Boston sections
with black pupils.
There were no major incidents#
reported yesterday. "It's not all
sweetness and honey," said
South Boston High School Head-
master William Reid. "Occa-
sionally you have words."
THE CHARLESTOWN and
South Boston areas are tough
Irish neighborhoods in which re-
sistance to integration has been
strongest. Both were markedly
calm yesterday as Boston went
into its third day of court-or-
dered integration.
Nearly 1,800 police officers
and 100 U.S. marshals around
schools and along bus routes
have made themselves highly
visible, although they have been
more relaxed since the decline
of incidents.
The streets around South Bos-
ton High School were empty
yesterday, except for clusters of
police. Black and white pupils
entered the building together for
the first time this year, passing
through metal detectors in the
doorways to screen out any wea-,
pans. None was discovered. I
IN CHARLESTOWN late yes-
terday morning, about 200 wo-
men staged an anti-busing
march for a second consecutive
day. Like Tuesday's march, it
was peaceful.-
The women, again accompan-
ied by toddlers and some carry-
ing infants, walked from a low-
income housing project about
six blocks to a Roman Catholic
church near Charlestown High
School, chanting the Rosary and
the Lord's Prayer. They stopped
briefly at one point to protest
the presence of about 150 police
officers.
Officers, some on horseback,
then moved aside and the wo-
men continued their march,
Have a flair for

UNOFFICIAL figures for 12
elementary, middle and high
schools yesterday morning
showed an average attendance
of 66.8 per cent of projected en-
rollments, compared with Tues-
day's attendance rate of 64.9
per cent.
Armed National Guardsmen
and police continued to ride
Louisville school buses yester-
day, although there had been
few reports of violence directed
at the buses. Rioting occurred
last weekend near three schools
in the south and southwest parts
of Jefferson County.
Gov. Julian Carroll has said
he hopes to send the Guard
home soon, but Louisville Mayora
Harvey Sloane has asked thatI
the troops remain through this
weekend.
THERE WERE no serious in-
cidents at schools during class
hours, and the rest of the coun-
ty remained quiet. An apparent
result of the relaxing atmos-
phere came when officials
closed down special processing
centers set up to handle the
flood of arrests, which had to-
taled nearly 600 in five days.
According to Louisville school
officials,attendance. Tuesday
hit 73 per cent of the 118,286
expected to enroll this year.
The desegregation plan calls'
for the busing of 20,600 pupils,
divided evenly between black
and white. The system is 80 per
cent white and 20 per cent
black.
Preliminary estimates placed'
yesterday's attendance at even
higher levels. Even at those
schools where major incidents
occurred Friday and Saturday
nights, attendance seemed to be
climbing rapidly.
gk y

b

AP Photo
Dat's a spicy!
Joe Deckert successfully defends his crown in the eighth
annual Polock Johnny's Sausage Derby in Baltimore, Md.
Deckert finished off 19 spicy polish sausages in an hour
to win the $100 first prize, a five foot high trophy and in-
digestion.

if
you
see
news
happen
coll
76-DAILY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 7
Thursday, September 11, 1975
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a i1iy Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Anr
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
campus area); $6.50 iocal mail
ichigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
lcal mail (other states and foreign).

SPECIAL
-WHILE THEY LAST-
Hewlett-Packard's
HP-35,
Scientific Pocket Calculator
Was
$19500 $99
WITH FULL YEAR WARRANTY
A Proven Machine-Originally Sold for $395.00
U LRICH'S Bookstore
549 East University Ave. Ann Arbor
Phone 662-3201

I

AP Photo
Looking for Jack!
When Walt Johnson of Robbinsdale sent away for some "New
Guinea Jumbo Beans" this summer, he did not anticipate
the results. The stalks climbed to about 20 feet high and
produced this bean which was one of several. It is over two
feet long and weighs about 40 pounds.
Spasskyl marriage
still up in the air
MOSCOW (AP) - Boris Spass- cheff to leave Moscow in her
ky's plans to marry a French- own best interests.
woman may provide a telling But Stcherbatcheff says: "The
test of how the Soviets intend French Embassy is not defend-
to treat their pledge at Helsinki ing me and is kicking me out."
to facilitate marriages between
Russians and foreigners. The French Embassy in Mos-

KOLBO MOVIES
"The Pawnbroker"
The psychological study of
a holocaust survivor.
Thursday, Sept. 11
$1.25 admission-Free Refreshments
at HILLEL-
1429 HILL-663-3336
FRIDAY, SEPT. 12
FIRST SHABBAT of the Semester
We Would Like to Welcome You Back with a
Community Shabbat Dinner at 7 p.m. Make
Reservations by 1 p.m. Fri., Sept. 12.

WE STYLE HAIR
We Don't Just Cut It
TRIMS-S HAGS
and RAZOR CUTS
2 SHOPS
Doscolo Stylists
611 E. University
615 E. Liberty

I

1.

U

TIRED OF DECIDING
EVEcRYTHING NO W?

m

r

We know

that schedule decisions

i

are a problem right now and we would
like to help. The University Theatre
Program gives you a chance to buy a
two series book of coupons at a DIS-
COUNT now and allows you to choose
the show and date later. It's called our
SPECIAL DISCOUNT BOOK; and it
contains 10 special coupons, four cou-
pons for each of the series listed here,
the Guest Artist Series and the Show-
case Series, plus two Bonus Coupons
whose use will be announced later. Use
each series coupon as you like, all four
for one production or one for each of
the four shows in that series. The Spe-
cial Discount Book is designed to fit
your schedule and budget (it's only
$10 ). Inquire at our ticket office for
more information.

Guest Artist Series
A selection of distinguished
actors or directors join with
our department's finest actors,
directors a n d designers to
create our own presentations
in Power Center.
Oct. 8-12
Arthur Miller's
DEATH OF A SALESMAN
Nov. 26-30
William Shakespeare's
AS YOU LIKE IT
Feb. 18-21
the musical
PURLI E
April 7-11
Tennessee Williams'
CAMINO REAL
In addition to o u r Power
Center productions, we en-
courage our graduate students
in direction and design by
offering
University
Showcase Productions
Oct. 22-25
NEW BLACK SCRIPT
inETrueblood Theatre
Nov. 12-15
Mach iavelli's
sAk~AInDAr-M IA

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