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September 07, 1975 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-07

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Sunday, September 7, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

...

r r

Govt. drug regulators hold
ties to private businesses

I'

WA S H I N G T 0 N (A') - encies have frequently charged The Consumer Product Safe-
More than 100 of the govern- that former industry employes ty Commission listed no em-
ment officials who decide what can be partial to their onetime ployes at the upper staff levels
drugs can be sold and what employers in taking govern- who come from industry.
chemicals can be put in food in mental decisions. These critics THE EMPLOYE lists were
this country once worked for have also said that regulatory compiled by nine agencies in
drug or chemical companies. officials might be swayed by response to a questionnaire
And more than 30 top - level the prospect of eventual em- from the investigations subcom-
regulatory officials are now ployment in the regulated indus- mittee of the House Commerce
making the rules for sale of try. Committee.
stocks and bonds to the public BUT AGENCY spokespersons The lists, along with tens of
by their former employers --defend the practice of hiring thousands of pages of other in-
including brokerage firms and persons with industry experi- formation, were released by the
stock exchanges. ence, citing their expertise in agencies in response to Free-
RECENTLY obtained docu- a particular area. They also dom of Information reqests by
ments show that a total of 350 point to the various federal I The Associated Press and news
decision - makers out of several laws and regulations designed organizations.
thousand in the nation's regula- , to prevent conflicts of interest The Federal Trade Commis-1
tory agencies once worked for by present employes and to sion listed 66 employes who
the industries they now regu- prevent former employes from previously were employed by
late. using specific knowledge gained regulated industries. The Securi-
And at least 41 high level of- in government work for private ties and Exchange Commission
ficials - and probably many benefit. . listed 35 employes; Environ-
more - have left those agen- The Food and Drug Admin- mental Protection Agency, 51;
cies in the last five years to istration leads the list of nine Federal Power Commission, 30;
take often more lucrative posts agencies with 115 employes who Federal Communications Com-
with companies in those same came directly or indirectly from mission, 20; Interstate Com-
regulated industries. industries regulated by the 1merce Commission, 15 and Na-
Critics of the regulatory ag- FDA. tional Highway Traffic Safety
___-- -___ - -Administration, 14.
FOR EXAMPLE, FCC Com-
missioner James Quello was
Kansas City favored vice president of Capital Cities
Broadcasting Corp., in Detroit
" before joining the commission.
as GOP convention SEC Chairman Ray Garrett,
J.came to that agency from
the Chicago law firm of Gard-
" " ner, Carton, Douglas, Children
t Aand Waug, which represents cli-
t i) ents regulated by the SEC. The
two prior SEC chairman, Wil-
WASHINGTON (-P) - Kansas City was the frontrunner yes- liam Casey and G. Bradford
terday as the Republican site-selection committee tried to choose Cook, also worked for law firms
representing such clients before
a location for the 1976 conventiOn. joining the agency.
Cleveland also was pressing a strong bid, with Miami
Beach, scene of the last two presidential nominating conventions, Onmet picursde oftagencie
offering a third alternative, response about former em-
THE SITE committee's recommendation goes to the Re- ployes now working in regulat-
publican National Committee on Thursday for final approval, ed industry was much less com-
but ratification of the committee choice is customary. plete than the data on present
Kansas City, which hosted last year's Democratic "mini- employes. The four agencies
convention" offered the Republicans $500,000 in services and fa- ich ovided actical no
e cilities for the convention next August, but city officials said said they do not retain person-
0 more money would be raised privately. I nel files on former employes.

DISCOVER FLYING
with the
MICH IGAN
FLYERS
for information call
769-6367 or 994-5907
or stop by
2304 Michigan Union
U=M STUDENTS:
The University's Enrichment Program offers
you the opportunity to take courses during
Fall Term in the Practical and Vocational
Arts at the Washtenaw Community College
Campus. This Fall's course selection includes
Auto Services, Welding, Typing, Black Art,
Carpentry, Photography, etc.
The cost is $12.50 per credit hour with
the registration fee waivered for U-M
students.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
AND COURSE REGISTRATION,
CALL WCC AT 971-6300

',
t

AP Photo
Lot of hot air
John Post, 63, of Vancouver sits amid balloons as he blows another up. Post, president of the
British Columbia Humor Society, blew up 846 balloons in 25 hours in an attempt to make the
Guiness Book of Records. The humor society does charitable work, and he wears the clown
suit when he entertains youngsters at hospitals.
CHICAGO, NY TEACHERS:
Contracttalks go on

t

i'

CHARING CROSS
BOOK SHOP
" USED
"BOOKS.

By United Press International I Richard Daley to get into
Talks to settle teacher unrest negotiations resuming Satur-
went on in the nation's two day. Daley has often shown hisl
largest cities yesterday as considerable skill as a mediator
negotiators sought to settle a earttlin the wee he said the
strike in progress at ChicagoE.he
and to head off one in New city's half million schoolt
York City. children must be allowed to get
Iinto classes. f
Police in Louisville, Ky.,
reinforced by 800 National HEALEY said he believed
Guardsmen, made mass arrests the Chicago school board would
of antibusing rioters after a aret etwt ae n
nigh of ioleceagree to meet with Daley and
night of violence students could be back in
NEARLY A million school classes by Monday. Almost all
E of the city's 27,000 teachers
children in a dozen states were have been on picket lines or
affected in the past weeksby refused to cross them in the
strikes of teachers or cus- walkout which began Wednes-
todians, A walkout in New YorkCy,
City, where the United Federa- dy
tion of Teachers has set aw The New York City area,
midnight Tuesday srtike dead- however, had other strikes. Lay
line if no contract is agreed on, teachers, members of the
would about double the number American Federation of Tea-
wouldabudubetenme hrs were picketing the five
of pupils out of classes. ces eepceigtefv
Negotiators on the New York high schools of the Roman
teachers' contract said there Catholic diocese _of Brooklyn,
was p r o g r e s s toward where 7,050 students were hit
agreement. by a strike. In Half Hollow1
In Chicago, President Robert Hills, Long Island, 800 teachers
Healey of the Chicago Teachers and 13,000 students were away
Union said he would ask Mayor from classrooms, with a hear-
ing on a back - to - work injunc-
THE MICHIGAN DAILY tion scheduled for Monday,
Volume LXXXVI, No. 4 along with resumed negotia-
Sunday, September 7, 1975 tions- Both strikes began
Is edited and managed by students Wednesday.
at the University of Michigan. News Outside of Chicago, the big-
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at AnnaArbor, Michigan 48106. gest unsettled walkout in Illi-
Published d a 11 y Tuesday through nois was in Elgin, where 26,000
Sunday morning during the Tjniver- children were affected. A court
sty year at 420 Maynard Street, Ant'
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription refused to issue an injunction
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area); returning teachers to their jobs,
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio); but cases were to remain
foreign). cltrstatesan cosed Monday when another
Summer session published Tues- injunction hearing was ordered.
day through Saturday morning.
Subscriptionrates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.50 local mal IN Pennsylvania, negotiations
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non- were expected to continue
local mal (other states and foreign). through the weekend to get
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SAILING CLUB
Announces Its Weekly Meeting
Every Thursday at 1:45 p.m.
311 W. Engineering
(Just above the Arch)
FREE !
$10 worth of Accessories
with purchase of any

settlements in 29 teachers
strikes or lockouts which have
kept 150,000 students and 7,500
teachers away from class
rooms. Another 116 teacher
districts havenot yet settled
on contracts.
About 90 per cent of the 963
teachers at Berkeley, Calif.
were off their jobs and onl
5,000 of the area's 14,O0w
students went toaclasses man
ned by substitutes and volun
eers Friday. High school teach
ers in San Jose voted to strike
unless a contract was reache
before classes make thei
scheduled start Wednesday.
The Boston Teachers Union
numbering about 5,000, votes
last week to strike the 84,000
student system unless a con
tract was settled by Sept. 22
Schools, in the second phase
of a program of court - orderer
desegregation, are schedule
to open Monday.
TEACHERS in Lynn, Mass.
were ordered by a court t(
return to their work Monday
ending a strike affecting 15,00
students.
At week's end, there wer
strikes in progress in Michi
gan, affecting 31,000 students
in Montana, with about 16,000
in Delaware, 4,200 out of classe
atWilmington; in Rhode Island
with more than 70,000 out in 1
cities; in New Jersey, wit
walkouts in Hoboken, Secaucu
and Passaic county affectin
12,400; and in Seattle, where.
walkout by custodians depriv
ed students of many of the us
ual school services.

Art & Illustrated

Danprharkc

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Cleveland Mayor Ralph Perk has said he can produce up
to $3 million, but party sources said item for item the actual
services and facilities offered by each city were about equal.

THE KANSAS CITY edge appeared to be its ability to houseI
the large number of delegates, guests and news media workers
attracted to the huge nominating conventions.
Cleveland, although it had the better convention hall, was
handicapped by a lack of hotel space. It tried to make up the
difference by offering cruise ships and temporary modular homes
for hotel rooms.
Miami Beach had been considered a fall-back position in
case the two Midwestern bids fell through. The Florida resort
area has one of the country's best convention halls and ample
hotel accommodations.
HOWEVER, party sources indicated the GOP really wantedj
a convention somewhere in the Midwest more attuned to the
"Middle American" constituency than Miami Beach or New!
York City, where the Democrats will meet next July.
A Kansas City convention would be held in the Kemper
Sports Arena, home of the National Basketball Association Kings
and the National Hockey League's Scouts. i
The convention setup would be similar to Madison Square
Garden, where the Democrats will meet, with some of the same
problems of cramped quarters and lack of floor space.
SPILLOVER from the Kemper Arena would go to neighbor-
ing buildings, including a livestock-horse show arena. This
might include such things as caucus and meeting rooms, news
rooms and other support facilities.
Kansas City originally had gotten into the bidding on the basis
of a new convention center, now under construction, but this
will not be used because the summer completion date is too
close to count on for an August convention.

III

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14

University of Michigan
Gilbert & Sullivan Society
ANNOUNCES
MASS MEETING
FOR
THE PIRATES
OF PENZANCE
Thurs., Sept. 11,8:00
Michigan League
ALL WELCOME

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