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December 09, 1976 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-12-09

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,. Thursday, December 9, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Thrdy Dcme 9 96TH IHGA ALgPg he

Russia urp
to renew c
trade relai

MOSCOW (AP) - The Soviets
are sending strong signals to
Washingion during the White
House trpnsition period that they
want to rekindle dampened
trade relations despite Kremlin
assertions not long ago that
Russia can thrive without Am-
erican business..
The Soviet message is not
new in substance but it seems
to carry a sense ofturgency and
accommodation not seen here
since trade detente collapsed
in early 1975. The essence is
that Moscow would like to do
real business with America if
Congress will only repeal the
trade law, which is regarded
here as a sla in the face.
IN RETURN for repeal of.
the Jackson-Vanik Amendment
to the 1974 Trade Act, the So-
viets have hinted that they may
ease some of their traditionally
awkward business practices and
turn this country into a more
profitable market for Uncle
Sam.
Leonid Brezhnev gathered a
group of leading American bus-
inessmen around him last week
and told them that restrictive
U.S. trade policies have result-
ed in the loss of nearly $2 bil-
lion worth of Soviet trade with
America over the past two
years.
The Communist party chief
was clearly not addressing just
the businesspeople, who have al-
ready counted their losses and
have taken a stand against the
restrictions.
THE LAW PLACES a $300 mil-
lion ceiling on Export-Import
Bank credits and t withholds
most - favored - nation status,
which would lower tariffs on
imports, from Communist coun-
tries that restrict emigration.
Since the trade law has done
little for either emigration or
business, the Kremlin is evident-
ly hoping the Carter adminis-
tration and the new Congress
will take a fresh look at the
legislation. Some 200 American
businesspeople, here for the
U.S.-U.S.S.R. Trade Council
meeting earlier this month,
were urged to put pressure in
the right places when they get
home.
Some Western specialists be-
lieve the Soviets are putting too
much hope on repeal of U.S. leg-
islative restrictions. They say
even if Congress does change
its mood - and there are few
signs of such a change - the
Soviets are ignoring other obsta-
cles that may lie in the path of
significant U.S. - Soviet trade
growth.
THEY CITE such examples
as opposition in some American
circles to transferring U.S. tech-
nology to a Communist competi-
tor, the concern over Moscow's
growing financial indebtedness
and the problems in doing busi-
ness with the Soviet bureaucra-
"Russians have been privately
confiding to U.S. business rep-
resentatives that the congres-
sional legislation has forced
Brezhnev and his pro-detente
supporters into a corner, block-
ed by Kremlin hardliners.
Brezhnev needs a "nondiscrim-
inatory" trade agreement with
the United States before he can
University Showcase
Production
Sir George Etherege's
Comedy
The Man of Mode
DEC. 8-11, 8:00 P.M.
ARENA THEATRE
(Frieze Bldg.)

$2.00 Adm. PTP Box Office [
764-0450

es U.S.
Nixon to confront past in
lampened T -nterviewswithrost
[ion s LOS ANGELES 0P) - Former President sessions, Frost said. The British TV talk
Richard Nixon has come to terms with the show host said he will edit the 24 hours of
either boost business with Am- Watergate scandal and "wants to confront tape down to four 90-minute shows.
erica or loosen emigration poll- his past" in public, says entertainer David "I HAVE SOLE control of the content,"
cies at home, these Russians Frost, who will do a series of TV interviews said Frost, "and Mr. Nixon has no right to
say. There is no way of know- with Nixon. know any questions in advance or to view
ing if these confidences are "I think that Richard Nixon wants to the shows before they are aired."
more tactical than genuine. confront his past, to give his version, to Under questioning, Frost conceded that no i
The annual volume of trade be candid," Frost said in a speech Tuesday one company "has come rushing forward"
turnover between the countries to the Hollywood Radio and Television, Si- with an offer to sponsor all four shows.r
has grown from $127 million in ciety. The interviews were initially planned for
19t, the threstimatyedar$2.7 bl "I THINK IT'S up to us to press him td go this month, Frost said, but were delayed
lion this year.. This puts the flrther," he added. Nixon is willing to dis- because of Pat Nixon's stroke, which putr
United States second, behind cuss "the whole Watergate saga," Frost Nixon behind schedule in writing his mem-
West Germany, among Russia's said. "He seems to have come to terms oirs.r
capitalist trading partners. j with it, -which is why he wants to confront "I WANTED him to finish the book, to
However, the bulk of the trade . his ownupast now." finish reviewing things before we begin,"
this year was in U.S. agricultur- Frost, who is paying Nixon an undisclosed Frost said.
al exports, such as wheat and sum for the exclusive interviews, said he Frost said later that he has received piles
corn, leaving the Soviets with will begin taping at Nixon's San Clemente of mail from Americans. suggesting ques-
a whopping 10-to-one import-ex- estate next March and will conclude in tions for Nixon. The most popular ques-
port deficit and leaving Ameri-I Anril. tion, he said, concerns the unexplained 18 -
can business without nuch of Nixt
the coveted Russian raw mate- Nixon has agreed to 12 two-hour taping minute gap on one of the Watergate tapes
rials or potential equipm ent ......*.......**...***r°...*.........r."... .....:..........
sales. Soviet raw materials in-
clude oil, such rare metals as " 1
rhodium and palladium, and un-' ' w an 00 alls
THE LEVEL OF Soviet ex- r ai
ports to the United States is
about equal to Soviet exports
to Greece. The level of U.S.
exports to the Soviet Union is
about equal to U.S. exports to
Peru. I SEOUL. South Korea (AP) -the Tongsun Park scandal." I officials are under investigation

WASHINGTON (AP) - The.
National Park Service says
alien animals ranging from wild
burros to the mongoose are de-
stroying nationalparkland,aand
the 'rangers are going after
them.
To rangers whose policy is to
manageand enhance a park's
natural and historical attrib-
utes, these animals have one
thing in common: They are non-
native to the eco-system. Envi-
ronmentally, in other words, the
animals are from out of town.
RANGERS HAVE SHOT goats
at Hawaii Volcanoes NationalI
Park and burros at the Grand
Canyon National Monument, bul
plans being considered are
much more ambitious.
Nothing has been decided be-
yond the fact that there is a
problem, says John Cook, as-
sociate park service director
for management. The options
for reducing the number of ani-
mals, he adds, include capture
and shooting. The latter already,
nas aroused some humane
groups who have heard of the'
plans.
Potential targets for removal
Let Sun's Own
Photographers
' Take Your
GREETING
PICTURES
it's not too late
SUN PHOTO
3180 PACKARDI
2 Blks. E. of Platt

include wild horses and burros
at Dinosaur National Monument;
burros in Grand Canyon, Death
Valley National Monument in
California, and BandelierNa-
tional Monument in New Mexi-
co; fallow deer at Point Reyes
National Seashore in California;
European wild boar at Great
Smokies National Park in North
Carolina and Tennessee; and
the goats and mongoose at Vol-
canoes.

Toby Cooper of the Defend-
ers of Wildlife organization
says the goats have turned part
of the Hawaiian tropical land-
scape into a desert. The mon-
goose was introduced to kill the
rat, which were introduced by
trading ships. But the mongoose
has developed a taste for rare
birds. Cooper says his organi-
zation will support, elimination

Animals destroying parkland

of the animals - in a humane
THE DEER, horses, burros
and goats trample the land manner - if it can be shown
causing erosion, says the park they are damaging the habitat.
service, or else they graze the The National Wildlife Federa-
land to depletion. Lion echoes that position.

. _ °-r- _..

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN DANCE COMPANY
with THE UNIVERSITY PHILHARMONIC and
the CONTEMPORARY DIRECTIONS ENSEMBLE

Elizabeth Weil Bergman's
THE PLANETS
by Gustav Hoist

Gay Defonghe's
LA CREATION
DU MONDE
by Darius
Milhaud

In balance, the Soviets are
suffering the most from this sit-
uation, and this explains why
most of the pressure to boost
Soviet-American trade is com-
ing from them. Not only does
Moscow owe approximately $7.5
billion in loans, to Western gov-
ernments and commercial banks
but it has been unable to build
a strong export market for its
machinery and manufactured
goodA in order to help pay its1
hard currency debts.-
Although Western banks have
not said the Soviets have reach-
ed their borrowing saturation,
there is concern about Mos-
cow's debt.
"They have to look harder,
wait longer and pay higher rates
than they used to for credit,"
one informed sources said.

Korean students demanded yes-
terday that their government
give them the full story of the
Korean bribery scandal in
Washington.
Plainclothes police broke up
a demonstration by some 500
students, most of them from'
the Seoul National University's,
law school, demanding the lift-
ing of the government's black-
out on news of the scandal. A
number of 'the demonstrators
were reported arrested.
THE STUDENTS also called
for democratic reforms and ex-
pressed disapproval of the 1972
constitution which gives Presi-
dent Park Chung-hee extraordi-
nary powers.
Placards carried by the stu-
dents read, "Lift Presidential
Decree No. 9," and "Clarify

The presidential decree of
May 13, 1975, bans virtually all
forms of political dissent. More
than 200 persons, including ma-
ny students, are believed to
have been arrested under it.
TONGSUN PARK is a South
Korean businessman alleged to
be a key lobbyist in Washing-
ton for President Park's govern-
ment. Gifts by him to members
of Congress and other American

by a U.S. federal grand jury.
Meanwhile, a high-ranking
South Korean official issued a
press statement charging that
the U.S. government was re-
fusing to let officials of the
Korean Embassy in Washington
interview an embassy officer
who the FBI reported last week
was cooperating with the inves-
tigation into the Korean lobby-
ing.

9
t
f
3
i
R

POWER CENTER
FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS
DECEMBER 10, 11 at 8:00, DECEMBER 12at 3:00
Tickets at Power Box Office and Hudson's

JOHN FORD'S 1940
THE LONG
VOYAGE HOME
John Wayne, Ward Bond, Barry Fitz-
gerald and Thomas Mitchell star in this
story of a British merchant ship that
takes on a suspected saboteur as well as
a cargo of munitions. Based on the play
by Eugene O'Neil.
FRI: Capra's IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE
CINEMA GUILD TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
7:00 & 9:05 \Admission $1.25

-r
AN ALL-TIME FIRST! UAC Soph Show
presents
glow
-i-
$11, ush wSS
For the first time ever .
a WOMAN'S rise to the top!
DECEMBER 9-11; Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m.
SATURDAY MATINEE 2 p.m., Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
TICKETS on sale at UAC Ticket Central $2.75-3.50
Information 763-1107

i
a

m

ANN AUUICL? [ILM CC-CID
TON IGHT
DAY FOR NIGHT
(La Nuit Americaine)
Francois Truffaut, 1973 AUD. A
Truffaut's love poem to the cinema and the movie
he was born to make. The warmth, humor and
elusiveness of film (and life) is explored as a
director (played by Truffaut) sets out to make a
film, MEET PAMILA, amid endless hilarious com-
plications. Academy Award for Best Foreign Film.
Jacqueline Bisset, Jean-Pierre Leaud, Jean-Pierre
Aumont, Valentina Cortese. French with English
subtitles.

wrVire r if:4 aaYLf . t i l lyil. _ _ "_:" aAi A _ .

... - - - _ - - _,- ... ._.- . _,- . ._._ ...._._. .,r..._ ._. .. . - .. ____ _ _ _

s

r ' u L i ' (. 7.' .4 '' fin 4 1/ [_i' rL. I- / . ' ./ -

$1.25

7&9

Tomorrow: BLAZING SADDLES
CHABROL NIGHT

Y
ComiIaMasterworks, and Odysse
yJ
- 3)2 RECORO SET
LIST $1398 JAIME LAREDO Chr stma-Sal
SALE $7.95 GLENN GOULD
BACH SIX SONATAS COLUMBIA
LIST $6.98 425 Per Di
SALE $4.25 MASTERWORKS
Pierre Boulez Conducts
I~ ~~~Duk as: L a P enoP E Eta T@ I IS
Roussel: Symphony No. ODYSSEY 6
Perahia Plays and Conducts ~r~ ~ ~
Piano Concerto No.14 in E-Flat Major. K449 °Bruno "
PianoConcertoNo 24inC Mnor,K.491 Dvor-kNe World"Symphony
'English Chamber Orchestra CD[U i$y phOrc estm
M 34201s
Prices Good thru
-Dec. 12, 1976 MSOGK IP-TAE$.5PC UJRESATA XHIBITO
and THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA
C.P.E. 2-RECORDSET SVIATOSAV KTE
Yankee Doodle Dandies! C.P.E. Bach LIST $6.98 JEAN-PIERRE RAMPAL winnerGrondPnxduDsque
Robert Merrill Three Trios for SALE $4.25 THE ANDEL:
The Mormon Tabernacle Choir " and ,FhzteRo( i FLUAE SANTA
nclading . ad ontinuo RO(Jl RY0LA( R6}iXHARI'SRCH0ROD w :/.:.."
The White Cliffs Of Dover."Youre A Grand Old Flag INNER GRAN) PR1X DIEDISQUE
Over Therelm AYanliee Doodle Dandy#'- Eue iD,
IsALong.LongWayToTipperar,/andmore Zukerman imaster charge
PVchas BRLNO WALTER
Zukerman f EINE KLEINE
viAlAn EIC NACH TMUSIK
IAN K AME R CA R D "r''CO/umhb-
S34215 34216MOZART-
' "-ine Kleine '.rehrmuSikf

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