100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 09, 1976 - Image 61

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-09-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, September 9, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page line

THE MICHIGAN DAILY i'age Nine

li

'Round-the-clock
women's services
By BARBARA ZAHS
Rape victims often report that the most degrading part.
of their experience was not the actual assault itself, but the
ordeal of reporting the incident to a police officer (usually
male) or testifying against the rapist in court. There is a
service in Ann Arbor, however, where a rape victim can
turn to another woman for help.
The Women's Crisis Center, funded primarily by private
donations and grants, works in cooperation with University
Hospital and the Ann Arbor Police Department to assist
women who have been sexually assaulted. Rape counselors
are on 24-hour call and will go directly to the hospital to
help rape victims.
"OUR MAIN services are rape counseling and problem
pregnancy counseling," explained Amy Friedman, one of
the Center's phone counselors.
"But we also deal with anything from depression and
feelings of referrals," she said.
Specially-trained counselors are on phone duty through-
out the day to help women with their problems. Although
most of the counseling is done by phone, the Center will
also deal with clients on a walk-in basis, Friedman said.
CURRENTLY, all of the counselors at the Women's
Crisis Center are volunteers. The women receive two week-
ends of intensive instruction in empathy training, rape
counseling, and general problem-solving counseling. Addi-,
tional sessions are held monthly to provide the volunteers
with further training.
The volunteers have formed several committees, among
them a Rape Education Committee which conducts work-
shops and gives instruction in areas such as self-defense.
The Center, in operation since 1972, recently moved to a
new location at 325 E. Summit and is currently undergoing
reorganization.
IF THE COUNSELORS at the Center aren't able to help
you with a particular problem, chances are good that they
can..refer you to someone else who can.
"We have the most completewreferral list in the city,"
Friedman said.
THE LIST INCLUDES names of doctors and lawyers, as
well as information on where to go for financial aid, child
care, birth control, abortions, or anything else you might
need.
All of the Center's services are provided free of charge.

Help is just a call away

By BARBARA ZAHS
The unassuming, paint-chipped building front
doesn't appear to hold much in store. There
are no flashing neon signs, no display windows,
nor even so much as a "Welcome, We're Open"
plaque hanging in the window.
But the blue paint-stenciled letters above the
E. William St. door quietly announce the build-
ing's identity. "Community Center," the words
read. "If building is locked, knock hard or call
761-HELP."
THE NUMBER will put the caller in touch
with a goldmine of social services, for upstairs
in the cramped second story of the aging build-
ing volunteers for Community Switchboard, the
Creative Arts Workshop, Drug Help and Ozone
House are waiting, equipped to deal with a host
of problems and emergencies.
The Community Switchboard serves primar-
ily as a referral agency. Workers have com-
piled a comprehensive listing of local stores,
organizations, and University agencies to help
answer any queries that callers may have.
According to co - ordinator R i c h Green,
Switchboard workers can field almost every
question that they receive.
"AND IF PEOPLE call up with a question
we can't answer, we'll research it," he says.
"This is extremely high in priority for us-
never to let any question go unanswered."
"We get about 2,000-odd, and some of them
are odd, calls a.week," Green adds. "Anything
from what to do on weekends to 'how do you
saute aardvarks?' "
The Switchboard also maintains an extensive
calendar of events. The calendar includes all
kinds of information, including what movies are

showing in town, what bands are playing at
the local bars, and prices of drinks.
The Center's Creative Arts Workshop, con-
trary to what its name might imply, does not
deal primarily with the arts. It was originally
designed to give instruction in the creative arts
and provide free studio space, but as the needs
of the community changed, so did the focus of
the workshop.
"OUR PRIMARY goal is to improve the qual-
ity of street people's lives," explains Pat Gud-
gel, a Workshop staff member. "We try to help
them develop new resources for themselves
and use community resources."
The Workshop offers free meals, clothing,
legal aid and job placement assistance to its
clients.
Drug Help is another service with a mis-
leading name. Staff members actually deal with
a multitude of problems.
Suicide prevention, depression and loneliness
are but a few of the areas in which Drug Help
counselors are trained to assist. The 24-hour
phone line serves as a referral service as well.
The Center's Ozone House, primarily for aid-
ing runaways, is unique in that it is one of the
few houses in the state that does not auto-
matically contact a runaway's parents.
Staff members believe that they are able to
provide the runaway with services and coun-
seling that are not always available at other
such agencies. Although the staff deals mostly
with foster care and counseling for youths, they
have also received general empathy training
to prepare them for family-related counseling
and suicide prevention.

Ozone house volunteers answer calls on the center's hotline.

Clinic:a

potpourri

STEVE'S LUNCH
1313 SO. UNIVERSITY
HOME COOKING IS OUR SPECIALTY

By SUSAN ADES
lf you've got an ailment,
chances are the first place you'll
want to hit for relief is the
University Health Service. Why
not? The University probably
gave you the ulcer in the firstj
place and if they could dish it
out they should cure it too--
at their own expense.
But the Health Service is not
your all-purpose medical cen-
ter either and for certain serv-
ices students are often forced to
look elsewhere. The Ann Arbor
branch of Planned Parenthood,
the Free People's Clinic and St.
Joseph Hospital's Walk-in Clinic
are all classified under the
"elsewheres."
BOTH PLANNED Parenthood
and Free People's Clinic are
non-profit agencies which caterl
to the community's indigent
population. And since time,j
money and human resources are
severely limited at these clinics
University students who already
have access to relatively low-
cost health care at Health Serv-
ice are discouraged from over-
burdening the alternative facil-
ities.
Mary Krell, Planned Parent-
hood's Education Coordinator

sa
a
PI
p
S
P
a
U
or
ti
fa
ai
r
e
t
g
a
p
ej
9
k
I i
it
Isl

ays, "In terms of regularly
ccessible sex-related services
lanned Parenthood is the best
lace." Her claims are sub-
tantiated by the fact that
Planned Parenthood is the only
bortion clinic in town besides,
University Hospital's (w h e r e
nly potential "problem" abor-
ion patients are handled). In
act, University Health Service
nd most other public clinics
efer patients to Planned Par-
nthood for first trimester abor-
ions. If the pregnancy has pro-
gressed beyond the eleventh"
week the patient is referred to
nother place with the appro-
riate facilities.
ABORTIONS at Planned Par-
nthood, which is located at
912 N. Main, run $175 but, in
keeping with their general bill-I
ng policy, if an individual is
not able to pay in full a pay-
ment agreement is signed and
he fee is managed on an in-
stallment pl)m.
"We try to be as flexible as}
possible," explains Krell. "We
have no set sliding fee scale.
We're kind of in flux on that'
but generally we do it (fee
assessing) on an individual
basis."
Fifty per cent of Planned
Parenthood's funds come from
patient fees, 25 per cent from
private contributions and an-
other 25 per cent is derived
from Federal Housing Educa-
tion and Welfare (HEW) alloca-
tions w h i c h are channeled
through the County Family
Planning Project of the 'Health
Department.
THE CENTER employs two
full time doctors and nearly 25
visiting physicians, some whom
are specialists and schedule
two or three hours of clinic
time per week.t
An alternative to abortion is
the "endometrial aspiration,"
also known as a "menstrual ex-
traction" performed at Planned

Parenthood for $75. The pro-
cedure involves essentially "va-
cuuming" out the uterine lin-
ing any time between the mo-
ment of unprotected intercourse
and the next period. The pro-
cess must therefore be done on
the assumption that one is preg-
nant because an aspiration must!
be performed before the point
at which the pregnancy can be
confirmed by testing.
Planned Parenthood will ad-
minister the pregnancy test to'
University students at a cost of
three dollars even though Health
Service provides the service,
albeit at a slightly higher cost.
A vasectomy clinic serves the
male population and for the gen-'
eral community Planned Parent-
hood has an education service,
a speakers bureau and a coi-
munity library for reference
purposes.
IN ANY CASE, Planned Par-
enthood handles some 200 pa-
tients a week almost exclusive-
ly by appointment.
Similarly, the Free People's
Clinic at 225 E. Liberty re-
requests that people call before
they come in and University
students are usually told that
the clinic can offer them access
to only two of its many services,
a women's "self-help group"
and legal aid.
The clinic's self help group
focuses on how to perform a
self examination as well as in-

struction on "weomen's prevent-
ative medicine."
A STAFF of lawyers volunteer
their services on Monday nights
for legal aid sessions designed
to meet the needs of low in-
come people. University stu-
dents are invited to attend and
are charged, along with others,
on a sliding scale.
Not as quick to turn away
University students is the St.
Joseph's Hospital Walk-in Clinic
where all kinds of general med-
ical care is given. And though
the $10 examination and diag-
nosis fee is a bit above Health
Service's free walk-in special,
the hours do provide for people
whose problems sometimes dare
to occur after 5:00 p.m. The St.
Joe's Clinic operates from 6-9
on M o n d a y through Friday
nights.

Breakfast All Day
3 Eqqs, Hash Browns,
Toast & Jelly-$1.25
Ham or Bacon or Sausage
with 3 Eqqs, Hash Browns,
Toast & Jelly-$1.85
3 Eqqs, Ribe Eye Steak,
Hash Browns, Toast&
Jelly-$2.25
We make Three Eqq Omlets
-Western Omiet
-Bean Sprout Cmlet
} 4 r
J '1I _- lv,

EVERYDAY SPECIALS
Beef Stroqanoff
Chinese Pepper Steak
Eoq Rolls
Home-made Soups, Beef;
Barley, Clam Chowder, etc.
Home-made Chili
Vegetable Tempuro
(served after 2 p.m.)
Hamburqer Steak Dinne-
( 1/2lb.).......... $2.25
Spaqhetti in Wine Sauce
Beef Curry Rice
Baked Flounder Dinner
1/4 lb. Roast Beef Kaiser Roll
Delicious Korean Bar-b-q Beef
(served after 4 daily)
Fried Fresh Bean Sprouts
Kim-Chee
Mondav-Saturday 8-8
Sunday 8:30-10
I'769-2288
1313 So. University

1

Daily Photo by SCOTT ECCKER
The Women's Crisis Center just recently moved into this
quaint little house at 325 East Summit.

iws

Trotter House: Serving the
needs of blacks on campus

(

By STU McCONNELL
William Monroe Trotter House doesn't serve
a black student organization-it serves all of
them.,
The forboding brick building, formerly a fra-
ternity house, is a cultural center for black
students interestedsineverything from karate
to films. Trotter sponsors films, lecures, con-
certs, dinners, parties, dances, a bible study
seminar and is available to other organizations
for use as a meeting place.
NAMED FOR William Monroe Trotter-an
early civil rights leader, co-founder with Wil-
liam DuBois of the Niagra Movement, and
founder of the Boston Guardian-the house be-
gan its programs in 1971 after demands by
black students for broader cultural oppor-
tunities.
Trotter House, located at 1443 S. Washtenaw,
also boasts its own dance troupe and gospel
choir,band the live-in staff of ten-who earn
their room and board by running the house-
are still adding new programs.
Robin Cain, assistant manager of the house,
explains that many of Trotter's programs are
initiated by students rather than by the staff.
"WE ARE THE vehicle for their ideas," she
says.
Come fall, the house will translate some of
those ideas into new programs. A photography
seminar is in the making, as well as a film
program with emphasis on black issues. Also
in the embryonic stages are a program to pre-
pare jobseekers for interviews and an art
seminar.
For a minimal fee Trotter is available for

use by student groups for "just about anything,'
within reason;" says Cain. Groups which havef
used the facilities include medical students,v
social work students and the Coalition for the:
Use of Learning Skills (CULS).t
TROTTER HAS also hosted several noted:
speakers, including Dick Gregory and Julian tI
Bond who addressed students at the house dur-
ing their visits to the University last wintert
term.
The Trotter House Gospel Choir, which has:
performed at churches and univeristies through-
out the state under the direction of Tanya
Moorman, is open to any interested talent.
The Trotter Dance Troupe, which has per-
formed in Ann Arbor, Detroit, Grand Rapids,
and Columbus during the past year, holds audi-
tions for participants in the house dance classes.
THE UNIVERSITY-OWNED building receives
funds from the University's Community Services
Office. Cain says the staff actually has less
money to work with than it had during its first
year of operation, but adds that lack of funds
has never deterred them.
"We just find new ways to do things," she
says.
Cain says that although the house has a core
of "regulars-people who are around a lot," the
center is always trying to attract new people.
"There's a communication gap between us and
the students," she says. "We try to bridge that
gap through meetings at orientation just to let
them (students) know we're here."
Trotter House will be holding a planning
meeting in conjunction with CULS this Sep-
tember.

-OPEN 24 HOURS-
WOLVERINE DEN
RESTAURANT PIZZA
WE SPECIALIZE IN
0 SICILIAN PIZZA
* REGULAR ITALIAN PIZZA
Also serving complete menu
PLUS Greek Specials
769-8364
1201 S. UNIVERSITY Corner of Church St

CHECK OUT
Cowoperatives
WE'RE
" member-owned
" member-controlled
" open and democratic
* inexpensive
YOU TOO, CAN ENJOY...
--an opportunity to participate in your house
and in the larger organization.
-small group living, lasting friendships, an
informal atmosphere that YOU'LL help
create.
-economical living (shared meals, shared
labor, wholesale purchasing, no landlords!).
-home-cooking.
-free washers and dryers, 15c Cokes.
We have 25 houses, on both
Central and North Campus
INTER-COOPERATIVE COUNCIL
Come see Room 4002 Michigan Union
662-4414
us soon.:Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Think about us in '76! CO-OPS ARE FUN!!!

I

Wi

I !

~OLLETT'*S
WELCOMES NEW STUDENTS TO
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
-
LET US ASSIST YOU IN YOUR ACADEMIC
ACHIEVEMENTS WITH A COMPLETE SELECTION OF:

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE
TRANSCENDENTAL
ME DITATIONsu
PROGRAM,
.i.... AV ern kA D 1ALL ?, <

TIlE Cl-AIN ACE

Chain ... a fashion necessity come
of age with unique and charming
styles. We have chain for every
occasion. Come in and see our com-
-lete assortment.

TEXTBOOKS
Fr Undraaduate

SUPPLIES
Qrtrnn c- IDD Ffl ZC

GENERAL
ROOI(S

II

I

.I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan