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November 10, 1976 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-11-10

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Page EigFit

THE MICHIGAN DAILY 4

Wednesday, November 10, 1976

Page E114i~'- THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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OFFICE HOURS
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FEA e
WASHINGTON (A') - The Fed-
eral E n e r g y Administration
(FEA) reported yesterday that
the nation in general should
have enough fuel to make up
for expected natural gas short-
ages this winter, provided the
weather and the, economy are
normal.
But the agency said North
Carolina may run into fuel short-
ages even in a normal winter,
and unusually cold weather
could result in shortages of pro-
pane, another heat energy
source, in that state and eight
o t h e r s: Georgia, Maryland,
South Carolina, Tennessee, Vir-
ginia, Kentucky, West Virginia
and Arizona.
IN SCATTERED local areas,
said an FEA draft report, short-
ages could occur that might
force temporary job layoffs if
alternate fuels are unavailable
or cannot be used.
"In North Carolina and Iowa,"
the report said, "some brick-
yards indicate that unavailabil-
ity of gaseous fuel supplies, or a
higher price . of propane or
emergency gas,mcould cause
them to lay off some employes."
No other specific layoff situa-
tions were forecast in the re-
port.
THE BIGGEST economic im-
pact of natural gas shortages
this winter, the report said,
would be the cost of alternate
fuels more expensive than na-
tural gas.
It said this might add some
$550 million to $660 million to
the nation's winter fuel bill.

Meanwhile a federal appeals enough of the heavy fuel oil used The federal appeals court
court ruled yesterday that na- as an alternate fuel by electric scheduled further hearings on
tural gas producers can collect utilities and some industries to the natural gas pric ceilings for
under new, higher price ceilings close the natural gas gap. tomorrow, according to the Fed-
as long as they make provisions eral Power Commission (FPC),
to refund money if the ceilings BUT IT SAID there could be which established the ceilings,
are later ruled out. problems obtaining or delivering and the Energy Action Commit-
The decision could mean in- enough of the lighter "middle tee, a citizen consumer group
creased costs of $15 to $18 a distillate oil" needed in Arizona, challeniging the new .Aates in
year on the average residential Kentucky, Tennessee and West court.
gas bill. Virginia if severe, prolonged The cost increase would hit
cold weather increases the fuel some families and industries
JOHN CHRISTIE, FEA assis- demand. harder than others, depending
tant administrator for energy
information and analysis, out-
lined highlights of the report at (S.
a hearing by a House subcom- A LAG
mittee on energy and power yes-
terday and gave the subcommit-
tee copies of the report. -5- fl
Christie did not make the re- rCes infit it
port available to news media,
but a copy was obtained by The
Associated Press. LONDON (Reuter) - The tored in London, marked the
Angolan government admit- first anniversary of Angola's
It forecast a nationwide na- ted over Luanda radio yesterday independence from Portuguese
tural gas shortage of some 1.84 that rival independence forces colonial rule.
trillion cubic feet, or about 18 it defeated in a bloody civil war The MPLA, supported by the
per cent of user requirements. were still opposing it militarily Soviet Union and backed by Cu-
with the help of "international ban troops, took power earlier
THE REPORT said residential imperialism." this year after defeating other
customers will not find their gas
service cut back, but commer- The radio report of a declara- independence groups including
cial customers, who were short' tion by the Ruling People's the o National FotfrteLbr
of about four per cent of their Movement for the Liberation of ation of Angola FNA athe
gas requirements last year, can Angola (MPLA) accused the of Angola the
expect a six per cent cutback government's foreign opponents Reports from Sith African
this winter., of infiltrating returning refu- officials in South West Africa
Idsresot1pecetgees with guerrillas. It said they Iofcasi ot etArc
Industries, short 19 per cent had mined roads and destroyed (Namibia) this week have indi-,
last winter, will be missing some equipment rated heavy fighting is going on
25 per cent of their gas require- in southern Angola between gov-
ments this year, while electric . erment and Cuban troops and
utilities will see their shortage THE DECLARATION, moni- UNTTA forces.
increase from 45 per cent to 51
per cent, the report said. IN ITS message, the MPLA
The FEA survey concluded said "imperialism continues to
that in general there would be Be sure make war against us."

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how much gas they use and how
mich of it is recen:ly-discovered
gas subject to the higher prices.
Energy Action immediately
asked the appeals court to re-
view the FPC decision, charging
that the increases were excessive
and unjustified, and asked the
court in the meantime to block
the rate hikes from taking ef-
fect.

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xpects enough fuel for winter

erialist
faction4S
ing them with arms -and equip-
ment. It continues to recruit
mercenaries."
The government said .it plan-
ned a general offensive in the
army to speed up its organiza-
tion and military power,
strengthen its disciplinq and
raise its political and idealogical
awareness.
"TAKING ADVANTAGE of
" the refugees who return from
Zaire and Zambia, imperialism
has found new ways of attack-
ing us, infiltrating among them
many of its agents," the mes-
sage said.
The MPLA also called for con-
stant vigilance against leftist
tendencies in its organization,
which "failed to take into ac-
rcmint the connrete situyation in

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kill ki fff. 41%

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to drown all
fires.

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Please. help prevent forest fies.

:planning a
PARTY?
"Quick grab
the donuts!!"
SUGAR BIN
BAKERY
corner of Liberty and Main
300 S. MAIN 761-7532

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It added: "It continues to vio- our country and the phase
late our frontiers, to set up bas- through which we are going and
es for the puppets FNLA, UN-
ITA and FLEC (Liberation make demagogical promises
Front for the Enclave of Cabin- which leave the people confus-
da), ;training them and supply- ed."
Prisoner to ask for
death rather than life,
PROVO, Utah (P) - Convicted P U B L I C DEFENDER
murderer Gary Mark Gilmore Michael Esplin, one of the at-
will appear before the Utah Su- torneys Gilmore fired, said the
preme Court today to ask that court could remove him ' and
his stay of execution be with- attorney Craig Snyder from
drawn and that he face the fir- , the case in accordance with
ing squad as originally sched- Gilmgre's wishes, leaving no
uled next Monday. one to argue for the stay pend-
The court granted a stay of ing an appeal of the case.
execution last Monday on a mo- But Esplin said there iscur-
tion by Gilmore's two court- rently no motion before the
ppntedattorneys,whom Gil- court to} remove the pair from
more says he has since fired. Gilmore's defense, and if they
are forced to withdraw, the
BUT the state attorney gen- American Civil Liberties Union
BUT he tat atorny gn- r atoreysforother death
eral's office filed a motion yes- or attorneys for iteree
terday asking that the court re- row inmates may intervene.
consider its decision on the stay. Gilmore was convicted of
Godehtsdesaidnean ths toy.first - degree murder in the
Gilmore has said he wants to killing of a motel clerk in a
die lrather than spend the rest robbery here. He faces an addi-
ofhis life in jail. He has spent tional murder charge in con-
18 of his 35 years in prison. nection with a killing in another
Leon Hatch, deputy warden Provo-area robbery.
at the Utah State Prison, said
yesterday that Gilmore will ap- HIS execution would be the
pear before the high court un- first in the United States since
der tight security. a Colorado convict died in the
gas chamber in June 1967.
The motion for reconsidera-
tion of the stay of execution,
$2.50 filed by Deputy Atty. Gen. Rob-
ert Hansyn, who WMs elected
attorney general earlier this
month, listed nine reasons, in-
chiding the fact that the motion
ct) for the stay was presented by
TYLER WILSON counsel who had been fired by
Gilmore.
6, guitar, autoharp)

I

FRI .-SAT.

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the N. R*.
(National Recovery A
w DAVE PRINE &,
(fiddle, banjo, dobe4

David Prine & Tyler Wilson have
olayed together for ten years.
T h e i r endeavors include the
Philadelphia Folk Festival, back-
ing up John Prine on three of his
albums and the Ark Power Cen-
ter Benefit.
GOOD OLD FASHION OLD TIMEY MUSIC
1421 HILL. .8:30 761-1451

3150 Carpe~ntr Road-Ann Arbor.971-.iu

Lour feet have beenlwaiing for Thedaijtheq
could have a pair of Levis a(1 ahemseves.New
Levis heavy leathers with rugged soles...
h rivets...'niHora(e ags.Cm'ron i on1
- - em a.luuh~t& Ii~a Oak

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