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September 09, 1976 - Image 59

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-09-09

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Thursday, September 9, 1976

i HE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

<hrdy September 9 1976 tdE MCHIGAN UAIL
Pinching and squeezing attz E.sr c Yx
sF re'S Mre

,:, _ _ .
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;<::

By ANN MARIE LIPINSKIE
"Your lettuce even smells bet-
ter," the woman giggles to the
farmerhasshe drops two green,
leafy heads into her produce-!
packed net bag.
"See you next Saturday," the
farmer replies to the woman
who has already made her way.
to the next open-air stall whereI
she is critically pinching a bas
ket of tomatoes.
ONLY AT Farmer's Market
would you hear someone pro-:
claiming the lettuce smells bet-'
ter. But that's because it does.
A cornucopia of pastoral de-;
lights, the Farmer's Market is

the city's own outdoors fruit and to fight off the cool morning air.
vegetable salad. But make sure Crates and pecks of the hand-
you're there early enough tQ nurtured vendibles are piled and
watch the feast unfold. lined in multi-color array, and
At the break of dawn, the al- as the first sleepy-eyed shoppers
most eerie silence of the early begin folding the dew-damp su-
morning outdoors starts to fade gar pears, the once desolate
as a caravan of trucks and sta- market is transformed into an
tion wagons begin rolling into animated fruit and vegetable
market: The rambling vehicles bin.
negotiate the parking space be- HAGGARD-LOOKING profes-
hind each of the market stalls, sorial types in houndstooths and
and soon the doors are flung op- Hush Puppies, middle - aged
en and out climb the vendors-: housewives with their weekend
healthier, happier versions of hairsets and double-knit pant-
Steinbeck's characters, t h e y suits, and spunky 12-year-olds in
stand covered in Osh-Kosh over- parkas covered with hockey em-
alls and protective rubber boots blems are all eyeing and finger-

ing the early morning fare, toss-
ing raisin bread and parsnip in-
to bags and baskets.
THE VENDORS drive their
delectables in from small farm-
ing towns outside of cosmopoli-
tan Ann Arbor before their cus-
tomers have even climbed out
of bed. Josephine and Everett
VanHoy make the short journey
from their 15-acre farm to their
permanent stall in the outdoor
market before 6 a.m., and begin
l positioning bushels and sacks of
their earth-born wares in entic-
ing fashion.
Out of the van and onto their
makeshift showcase - a long
wooden table scarred by knife
cuts and soiled by years of serv-
ice-go the hand-tilled products
of the VanHoy farm. Carefully
and exactingly the seven kinds
of apples, the soil-covered beets,
the carrots and the pears are or-
dered. Then come Mrs. Van-
Hoy's kitchen creations: jams
and preserves bottled in baby
food jars, pickles produced from
their summer cucumber crop,!
and tempting apple pie and ba-
nana bread which she took from'
her oven only hours ago.
And it's all there for the ask-
ing( year-round, on thecorner
of Fifth St. and Catherine -
where pinching and squeezing is
a legal activity.
(o-op option
(Continued from Page 4)
enough meat in the meals, oth-
ers wish the houses were com-'
pletely vegetarian.
A member of Joint House, one.
of the larger co-ops, comments,
"There's a tendency in houses
of this size (60 members) for
factions and cliques to develop.
Then there's the usual stuff
about people fucking up and not
getting their jobs done." "Both
issues usually get aired out fair- '
ly well at house meetings," he'
adds.
Another frequent complaint is 3
the lack of privacy. Your bed-;
rooms are doubles with only se-1
cond and third year residents
getting a shot at a single room.
"There just isn't much space of,
your own," one woman in Stev-
ens House told me. "Like right
now I'm out talking to you in1
the hallway - because I can't1
stretch the phone chord into my
bedroom."

Daily Photo by STEVE KAGAN
Several shoppers gaze at the gushing fountain in Briarwood Mall's Grant Court. The futuristic mall features over 100 trenly
shops and restaurants in a mammoth, weather controlled environment.
Fear and loathing at Briarwood Mal

By JAY LEVIN
For all of you coming here from those secure suburban
meccas, saddened by the thought of your final fling with Dad's
credit card at such extravaganzas as Roosevelt Field or the
Fairlane Town Center, fear not. Ann Arbor, despite its dis-
cernible small town flavor, boasts one of the gaudier shopping
malls in southeastern Michigan - Briarwood - a glossy, crys-
talline shopping bag oasis set amidst acres of rolling grass-
lands.
So have Dad fork over the Master Charge. You'll need it.
BRIARWOOD, now three years young, features over 100
shops - trendy establishments running the gamut from the
mammoth Sears, Penney's and Hudsons to small specialty
shops peddling everything from pillows (The Toadstool) to cup-
cakes (Bakers Corner).
In addition to its mind and wallet boggling selection, Briar-
wood's enclosed promenade is usually a circus of activity. The
mall frequently sponsors bands and displays designed to draw
both the shopper and non-shopper through its glass doors, into
the gleaming, solar-lit interior.
Of course, in the back of every mall exec's mind are the
crisp greenbacks and plasticized charge plates most people
carry religiously. But it is possible to enjoy an inexpensive day
of window shopping, people watching and mall strolling at
Briarwood if you can resist the temptation of 100 stores sump-
tuously flaunting their wares in colorful schemes, titillating
your vunerable senses.

WHATEVER BRIARWOOD is doing, it is doing it in grand
style, as evidenced by the thousands of folks who flock daily
to its stores, restaurants and cinemas. Briarwood is also weath-
er-controlled and accessible by city-run buses, says Sybil Little,
Briarwoods promotional director, who is responsible for the
scheduling of the mall's shenanigans, "The enclosed .-mall is
the main street of many communities."
But Ann Arbor already has its own Main Street, a well
scrubbed, tree lined thoroughfare with long-time storefront mer-
chants and only a five-minute walk from campus.
Despite Briarwood's obvious siphoning-off. of some Main
Street customers; the Ann Arbor Chamber of Commerce is
not panicking.
"I THINK THE DOWNTOWN has an old, established
clientele, and is not affected by the competitive market," says
Jim Gohl of the Chamber.
In fact, Gohl sees Briarwood's recent debut as a tonic for
the downtown renovation program presently underway by the
city, which includes additional construction and beautification
measures. The mall has also emphasized the importance of
increasing facilities for shoppers in the downtown region, such
as parking. \
Outside of Briarwood and downtown, most University stu-
dents are indebted to the conveniently located State Street and
South University merchants. Shops in those areas enjoy a heavy
campus clientele and cater to today's typically collegiate tastes
in everything from Levi's to backpacks to burgers. For the more
financially endowed, State Street boasts both a Jacobson's and
a ritzy, miniature Saks Fifth Avenue.

Daily Photo by STEVE KAGAN
A Farmer's Market vendor gladly weighs her produce for an early-morning customer.

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