100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 02, 1976 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, November 2, 1976

ATTENDANCE RECORDS TO FALL

4

Everybody

By DAVE RENBARGER

a shoe-in for its third consecu-

On the field, the mighty Mich- tive attendance record.
igan football machine is in the Through the first six games
midst of its most successful 618,006 bloodthirsty fans hav
season in quite awhile, but, at -paid their way into Michiga
sheate, ititsdoigeenbt-atStadium to witness the sacrific
the gate, it is doing even bet- of one football team after an
ter. other as the Wolverines keep
Having entertained six straight rolling along.
100,000 plus gatherings already That averages out to ove
this year, the Wolverines must 103,000, easily surpassing las
draw a paltry 71,000 more in year's average of 98,000.
their final home appearance Looking back over the years
versus Illinois to eclipse their the increase of about 8,000 pe
own NCAA attendance mark set
last year. game seems just about right.
BQck in 1974, Michigan aver-
Considering the fact that the aged 93,684, ending Ohio
cgntest has already been de- State's longtime NCAA attend-
clared a sellout, Michigan is ance domination. In '73, the

Tuesday Night
is
LADIES' NIGHT
Free Admission for Ladies
GENERAL ADMISSION $1.00

ves az
Wolverines drew an average
of 85,025 fans.+
, With 'this ever-increasing de-
e mand for football tickets, the
n folks at the Athletic Depart-+
e ment may soon be presentedl
- with a problem - not enough
,p tickets to go around.
"I can see in the near fu-
r ture that -the day will come
t' when it will be virtually im-
possible to get an individual
s, ticket to a Michigan football
r game," said Ticket Manager A]
Renfrew.
. Between the students, alum.
ni, faculty, staff, and outside
* fans, over 77,000 season tick-
ets were sold for the 1976
season, and that figure is on
the rise for next year, ac-
cording to Renfrew.
"We've got to honor our sea-
son ticket holders first," said
Renfrew, "and we can only go
so far."
What factors have contributed'
to the skyrocketing demand forl
Michigan football over the past'
few years? Renfrew feels theI
reason is three-fold.
"First of all, we have a win-
ning program here," he stated.
With only one loss at home in
over six years, that's hard to
deny.
"The climate was just right
for us a few years back,"
Renfrew continued, citing the
fans displeasure with the pro-
fessional teams of Detroit.
"People who wanted to see a
winner had the opportunity
to come out here and see for
themselves."
Renfrew also feels that while'
the game itself is the major at-
traction, many fans are attrac-

rnner
atmosphere, different from most
other athletic events."
"Sure, the game is the focal
point, but it is all just a part
of an entire day for the fans,
out with their friends," he said.
Lastly,;Renfrew does not fail
to give credit to the men who
"make everything go around:
here" - Athletic Director Don
Canham and Coach Bo Schem-
bechler and his staff.
Next year, fans can Expect
to be hit with a ticket price
hike, according to Renfrew.
Although nothing has been of-
ficjally decided, Renfrew sees
next year's individual tickets
selling for $8, with student
prices uprfrom $3 to $4.
Other changes in the near fu-
ture include a scaled down ver-
sion of the annual Band Day
extravaganza, in an effort to
sell more tickets and give awayI
less.
Aside from 4 these minor
changes, Michigan's Athletic
Department is understandably
content to sit back and count
the money taken in by the
most successful collegiate foot-
ball program in NCAA history.
And with the continued fine
play of the Wolverines, plus the
prospect of teams like Ohio
State, Texas A&M and Notre
Dame coming to Michigan Sta-
dium in the future, the crowds
may never thin out.

Daily Photo by BRAD BENJAMIN
RICKEY GREEN THE WOLVERINE is, guarded by sopho-
more Alan Hardy during a practice session. Green was a
unanimous All Big Ten selection and honorable mention All\
America last season. Hardy, brilliant in spots last year, hopes
to crack the starting lineup as a forward. Johnny Orr's cagers
held their first intrasquad game Sunday night.

Wn~ the lower level of the Corpus Arde)

ORR SHUFFLES LINEUPS:
Cagers hold intrasquad

ted to Michigan Stadiur
tumn weekends for "th

we - m m -g - m - -o - m ~

1 $5.00
1I

FIVE DOLLARS OFF ALL DOWN
JACKETS, PARKAS and VESTS

I
I
I
-I
I

WILDERNESS OLITFITTERS
ANNOUNCING THE OPENING OF OUR STORE
AT .THE CORNER OF HURON AND N. MAIN,
W FD., NOV. 3
We've moved our store and would like to have you come in and let us
outfit you with the best equipment at the best prices, so we're offering
incredible bargains; 15%; TO 40% OFF BACKPACKS, TENTS, and
MORE.
Our Salespeople are Certified, Professional Instructors & Guides in
Mountaineering, Backpacking, and Wilderness Camping who can give
Expert, Tested Advice. We don't sell everything from Tennis Equipment
to Women's Clothing-We're Equipment Specialists.
-STORE POLICY-
If within 30 days of purchase you find an item bought from us at a lower
price elsewhere, we'll refund the difference. For every $10 purchased you
get a $1 credit towards your next purchase.
" GALIBER " DANNER " SILVA 0 WOOLRICH
* UNIVERSAL AND PAUL PETZOLDT WILDERNESS EQUIPMENT
NEW AbDRESS-107 N. Main-761-8515
2 to 8 Wed. thru So. (Open 10 A.M. on Opening Day)
ACROSS FROM THE COUNTY BUILDING

m on au- By SCOTT LEWIS past, was again. evident at
e entire Crisler Arena. Both teams also
--!The Michigan basketball squad lized an-to-man defense
' showed the. results of its first throughout he gam
two weeks of practice Sunday throg HUFLe a.
IInight in the first intrasquad ORR SHUFFLED all of his
0 scrimmagetof the year.u players in and out of the line-
up in order to observe all of
The running, pressing style of the possible combinations work-
basketball,characteristic of ing together.
J yOrr-led teams in the t
In the first half, the two
r::'siise am s : Elss a s gsag qu ick est gu a rd s on th e tea m -
T2Ricky Green and Dave Baxter
P 2- led the Blue team. That tan-
B U d sdem, along with Phil Hubbard,
* By The United Press Tom Staton and Alan Hardy in
1. MICHIGAN (40) 8-0 418 the frontcourt, was too quick for
2. Pittsburgh (1) 8-0 364 the White team, paced by co-:
4.UCL ........-122 captains Steve Grote and John,
5 Texas Tech.6-0 219 Robinson.
6 Maryland . 80 174I BOTHI TEAMS used a full-court
8. Georgia..... 7-1 120pess most of the nd
9. Nebraska ............. 6-1-1 1171 Blues stole many inboundspas
-10 Florida... 6-1 72 es for easy layups, in outscor-
11. Notre Dame.......6-1 39
I 2. OklahomaState. . 5-2 24 ing the Whites, 55-34. Green al-E
13. Colorado ........,......6-2 21 so displayed the form that made
14. Arkansas ...............5-1 11 him one of the top guards in
15. Alabama...............5-2 6 the nation last year by continu-
I 16. Tulsa..........5-2 4
17. Houston.... ........... 5-2 2; ally converting fast breaks to,
18. LIBELS.8-0-0 2 quick baskets.
II .WATCH
ELECTIONA'EI
WITH MERON BENVENISTI
DEPUTY MAYOR OFJERUSAL
0o Tuesday ,Nov2
- 9PM1-?

Orr moved Hubbard to a for-
ward in the second half, along
with ' Robinson, put Green and
Grote in the same backcourt,
and added Tom Bergen to play
center. Hubbard played very
well at forward - his natural
position, and Green and Grote
slowed the team down to a
more deliberate-type offense in
disposing of the undermanned
Whites.
BOTH ORR AND Assistant
Coach Frieder were pleased
with the results of the scrim-
mage, especially the fact that
the team's fast break worked
so well. "They sure can run,
can't they?" beamed Orr after-
wards. .
So farsOrr has made no indi-
cation as to his starters for the
opening game November 27
against Western Kentucky.
Three and-a-half weeks of prac-
tice still remain, and .the deci-
sion probably won't be made
for a while.

PRETZEL LOGIC
By RICK BONINO
Bo talks politics, . .
... pulls for Ford
0 WHAT DO you talk about at yet another press conference
when everything's been said and all's right with the world?
"Gentlemen, let's talk politics," Michigan coach Bo Schem-
bechler said to open his press luncheon yesterday.
"Okay, who's voting for Ford " Bo asked. "I'll tell you, the
man took over the head coaching job of a decimated program.
Whether you fellows realize it or not, he's done a good job.
"But you can't do it all in two years," Schembechler
said. "We shouldn't change coaches now!"
Tongue-in-cheek? Somewhat. Trite? Perhaps. Out of place?
Possibly.
But what's left to talk about when you outduel hearttrouble
for the mere chance to coach and then end up piloting a power-
house that the polls cite as the nation's best?
Even the ubiquitous Bob Ufer chipped in. "Ford has to beat
Carter, you've got to beat Woody and we're going to Pasadena,"
the glib Wolverine radio announcer quipped.
But I get the idea that any victory Schembechler might
enjoy in California would play second fiddle to this summer's
triumphant open-heart surgery.
The nationally distributed Sunday newspaper supplement
Parade, this weekend deemed the story of Schembechler's strong-
willed recovery and near-Spartan lifestyle worthy of a full-page
feature.
"I'm really lucky," Schembechler said. "I'm just tickled to
be out there coaching."
With the season Michigan's having, who wouldn't be? Bo,
obviously an outstanding coach, may well have his most out-
standing team ever, on and off the field.
'Record wise, production wise, this team' is ahead of
the others," Schembechler said, "on the basis of scoring,
defense against scoring, total yardag.
"But comparisons are tough to make," he warned. "The
criteria are different, such as the quality of the competition and
the injury situation.
But Bo's beginning to admit that his Wolverines might just
be as good as the sportswriters tell him. In response to a question
about Big Ten quality considering the showings of Michigan's
opponents, he said, "Maybe we're just pretty good. When those
team play each other, they have pretty good games."
"We haven't had a down period this season," he continued.
"There's always a couple of games where you're scratching. I
felt we could've played a little better against Northwestern, but
that's it."
Schembechler remains quick to remind one that it takes
more than just a gridiron talent to make a good football
player.
As the fall wears on and the routs pile up, Bo's comments
have moved from more substantive game information to talk of
personalities, emotions and the season, he admits, is proving
more fun than usual.
"We have a tremendous group of kids here, and not just ath-
letically," Schembechler said. "They're an easy team to coach
-they respond well, they're eager. I like being around them.
"They seem to enjoy themselyes," he continued. "They're
not bitching, griping, coming in to talk to me all the time."
Bo Schembechler seems as good a judge of character as
anyone He appears honest, principled and straightforward, a
man w om one should'attempt to read nothing into - perhaps
quite similar to the candidate both he and Woody Hayes
champion.
But come the pollinghour,'all that character, all those fine
young men and all those impressive performances can't help
Schembechler one bit.
"When do the polls open? Seven? I'll be there early," he
promised. "Gentlemen, we've got the big one tomorrow and I
hope all of you are with me."
Sorry, B, old buddy. If a good portion of the American
electorate - including at least one of those writers you'so gra-
ciously entertain - has its way, tomorrow night may leave the
first blemish on your otherwise Utopian autumn.
RE-ELECT
CATHERINE McCLARY
County Commissioner-Dist. 15-=Democrat
0 Chair, Ways and Means Committee and 1975 Budget

Subcommittee
# Member, Physical Plant, Criimnal Justice Planning, and
Nominating Committees; Drain Board, and Retirement
Commission
# Employed, Women's Crisis Center, coordinates Audio-
Visual Project on Rape
# Volunteer, Women's Crisis Center, trains counselors and
assists rape victims
# Member, Board of Directors, National Women's Health
Care Network Pd. Pol. Adv.
paid political adv.

$5.00 FIV
S- .. -. -. .. .. v-

'E DOLLARS 1 $5.0
-- - - . - - -- u-

I

I

I
7' b-
4,

7
t

I.

I

.

f

s,
ti

i

:lI

Uli

li"

All

Experience That Counts
GEORGE STEEH, a native of Washtenow County, is a
graduate of the University of Michigan Law School.
He had experience in the Genesee County Prosecutor's
Office, the best in the state and one of the finest in the
nation. He rose quickly to the position of Senior Assistant
Prosecuting Attorney and held one of three policy-making
positions among 31 assistant prosecutors.
He has had extensive experience in all aspects of a modern
prosecutor's office, including felony and misdemeanor trials
and appeals, probate, civil, and juvenile court work.
Most importantly, he effectively managed an Economic
Crime Unit with a staff and case load more than twice as
large as the entire Washtenaw County Prosecutor's office.
Under STEEH'S leadership, the unit gained national ac-
claim from criminal justice professionals and the news
media, including national CBS News.
STEEH is a recognized leader in developing innovative
approaches to confront the crime problem. He helped
develop a rape crisis center, victim assistance programs
for sexual assault victims, a community-based crime pre-
vention program, and a budget and credit counseling pro-
gram. He is the only law enforcement representative from
the state of Michigan on the National Economic Crime
Project. He is an organizer of a national project to act on
the special crime problems of senior citizens.
GEORGE STEEH will bring a total commitment to the job.
He will provide the leadership and action we need from
our prosecuting attorney.
VOTE

I

TONIGHT is:

I

LADIES' NIGHT

I

I

NO COVER CHARGE FOR LADIES

.'

t

(

APPEARING TONIGHT thru

Nov. 7

BLAZE
''CINCINNAT'S HOTTEST ROCK BAND"

)

;lhn 11'rnp Uru Q2rC

I

I

I

II

m

M& ~w~nlt,.II

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan