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September 09, 1976 - Image 51

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-09-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r Thursday, September 9, 916

TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pneiqa Minr*'II~ IP

ThrdySpeme_,196TE IHGA AL

rug e 1-41FI

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To S
(Continued from Page 5)
"I like it bare, leaving only
the essentials in it," he says.
"Not ostentatious. The o n 1 y
thing on stage is the mimist.
It's a popular form among the
real die-hard mimists, the ones
I respect. The other kind -
props, costumes, other mimists
to help you - isn't as difficult'
for the audience to get into, but
my style is much more reward-
ing to me."
"I ike serious pieces," he
contin-'c-s. "Pieces with a piecel
of pathos. Pathos," he repeats.
"That's a good word . . . Any-
way, there's something about
the white face and the 1 o n e
figure on stage that is conducive
to getting serious thoughts
across."
Of the roughly fifty different
mime and pantomime presenta-
tions included in his repetoire,
he counts ninety per cent as
original creations, five per cent
"rip-offs" and the remaining
five per cent "standards - your
dues. If you're good, you oughta
throw those in."
But Seth has no patience for
"practioners," those performers
who strictly pay 'dues".
"It's not enough to be a pra-
titioner - doing a walk, climb-
ing a ladder, pulling a rope -
unless you can relay more emo-
tion. You have to get the person
across, the character across.
There are some people in mime
who are very much like modern
dancers - they're just in it for

ath, silence
the body movement. I don't dred times. He grips his fnigers
mean to downplay that," he around a hockey stick yog can
says, apologizing as he does see only in your mind's eye,
each time he takes a poke at rounds his shoulders, then
a facet of his art,"Tbut you've swings his arms from left to
just got to relay emotion." right in big, bulky, Bobby Orr
fashion, as he tries desperately
to imitate the easy skim of a
ALTHOUGH SETH performs skate over ice with his slippers
both mime and pantomime, on his living room carpeting.
there is a crystal clear differ- "I just can't do it," he says.
ence in his view between t h e "It's just not smooth enough."
two. "Some people will say Seth also admits that those
they'reuinterchangeable," he routineshenonceadelivered like
points out, "but not me." clockwork need a little polish-
"Pantomime is a shorter, fun- ing now, because he has b e e n
nier skit involving the creation away from professional per-
of illusion with the performer formances for nearly a year.
generally playing a character - "I don't need any more teach-
the common man caught w i t h ers," he proclaims, "because I
his pants down,, trying to right know enough and I was good
himself. But mime," he says, enough that I can get in shape
rolling the word off his tongue myself. I think I have a long
as if it were a mantra, "mime way to go to catch up to the
is more abstract, harder to un- all-time greats, but when I get
derstand, because you have to back in shape," he adds quick-
create an emotion, and you ly, "I'm good. I know that."

f .,

gIden

I~lNl Vx

i

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a
'sl
i3
t
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nave to relay that emotion.
One of any artist's biggest'
fears is that the point of their
performance will be lost on the;
audience. Has there even been!
an emotion or action he w a s
unable to relay?1
"No, I've never really h a dj
difficulty getting something ...
Oh! I know. Ice hockey. I
can't do it, I could just neverI
do that." And before the con-
fession is out of his mouth he,
has leaped from his chair ,and;
is. attempting the routine youI
know he has attempted a hun-

A PROUD artist, he says he'll
peddle his wares for free
now, but won't go in front of a
paying audience until he's tak-
en off the twenty extra pounds
he indicates with an endearing
pat to his stomach, and has
sharpened the tools of his trade.
"I won't go in front of a pay-
ing audience if I'm not good. I
put them up high. They deserve
a lot. So when I'm in shape in
another two or three months'
I'm just gonna start knocking
on doors."

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL ITHEATRE PlROGRAM
OFFERS YOU A VARIETY OF THEATRICAL PRODUCTIONS
;best of Repertory Quest Artist
Broadway Company Series
Series A selection of distinguished
A selection oft tactors or directors join with
seetraasonthe best touting Ihe finest touring repertory our department's finest actors,
stage dramas and musicals vil comranies are in residency il directors and designers to create
able from New York or in AArbor, in Power Center. ourown presentations in Power
current previews in Power Center.
Center. Nov. 4-6 Center.
Spt."4-26 The Young \'ic Oct. 13-17
Sept. 24-Z6 eseonts OTHELLO
A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC OEDIs EXnsov. 3-
OEDIPUS EX No.2 3-28
Oct. 1-3 & OH WHAT A LOVELY WAR
or Oct. 29-31 THE TAMING OF THE SHREW
PLAY TO BE ANNOUNCED Feb. 16-20
P BNTo Be Announced THE SEAGULL
Jan. 21.23 Another Repertory Company
SHERLOCKHOLMES In Residency April 13-17
A NEW MUSICAL TO BE
Mlarch -6 ANNOUNCED
A New Dramatic PhN
INTO THY NARROW BED
March 25-27
ABSURD PERSON SINGULAR
Added Bonus Attractions Inaddition toour Power Center.
Nov. 9 productions, we encourage our
DON'T BOTHERME I CAN'T COPE graduate students in direction
and design by offering:
jan 3 1 Season Socs
CLAUDE KIPNESSMIME TROUPEa
April 18
William Windom
in _ _ _ _ r d c i n
THURBER TWO Sept. 17-19
FIVE ON THE BLACK HAND SIDE
Oct. 27-30
Name D~aie WHAT EVERY WOMAN KNOWS
Dec. 1-4
Address THE MAN OF MODE
Jan. 26-29
S-LIFE CLASS
Please send me information on the series I have indicated Mar. 30,31 and April I & 2
when brochures are available. BINGO
__._..Best of Broadway Series Guest Artist Series
Repertory Company Series Showcase Productions
Professional Theatre Program Mendelssohn Theatre *Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
r _ ______-_ _--___-

b
.

Daily Photo by STEVE KAGAN

From

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(Continued from Page 5) on glass early on a Saturday came away with $200 in his poc- the panels of colored glass. larger, more impressive com-
Once again, Ralph reaches morning at Farmer's market, ket that day. "Now if the So- "Sport is the new temple," missions.
in, this time to pull out items or at an art fair somewhere. cialists take over we'll all be Raloh explains matter-of-factly. WHAT WOULD HE create if
of a less practical nature. First "People might go just to get a out of business," he chuckles. "The Eastern emphasis on J he had at his fingertips all
appears a three by five foot rutabaga or something, but Still, the most grueling task short is incited the place- the resources in the stained
design undulating with blue and they see a piece of glass they of all is gleaning patrons from ment of stained glass in sport glass world? Ralph responds
white Miroesque forms. He like and they go home and think a public unaccustomed to buildigs . . . Did you know, without hesitation, as if he'd
sets it in its element by the about it. Then sometimes they adorning their homes with a there's a book out caled "Zen been pondering the question all
window and fetches another come back and give me a com- decoration which for ages was and the Art of Tennis? . . . It's along. "We (he and Vavrine)
glass painting - this one a mission." virtually patented by the true." muse about hanging a piece by
mildly abstracted woman as- And strange commissions Church. After all consider how R:ph too, has benefited from dirigibles over the Grand Can-
sembled from small warm-ton- there have been. Oner customer out of step one might feel buy- this new source of business. He yon with the diffuse light of an
ed pieces of glass. Some are who Ralph described disdain- ing church pews for living recently collaborated with his orange sunset coming through
painted with details and fired fully as "a rich dentist and room use. friend and teacher, Bob Vav- it."
-a technique Ralph toys with elitist," ordered a 30 by 23 QUCH SENTIMENTS are not rive, a locally acclaimed stain- Then he giggles like a child
in his spare time. inch window for his bathroom a consideration ii the de- ed glass craftsman, on the de- over his wit and tacitly dis-
These abstractions of nature fashioned precisely after the sign of institutional structures. sign and construction of a 7 by misses the question as too lofty
are not the stuff of a mere wallpaper. It took Ralph two Restaurants, bars, even Mc- 15 foot panel of stained glass to apply to his realistic goals.
craftsman, but the rantings of , hours to design the piece, an Donalds have all stepped up to that will adorn the Uniersity's Ralph just wants to collect a
a proud artist. But for now, the afternoon to cut it from the claim their share of stained new HIl area sporting facility. reservoir of different media to
lanky, stoic-faced Ralph will factory - prepared sheets of glass. While churches have The energy that radiates from "play" with. "I tend to be a
have to put most dreams of glass and an additional few evolved into squat, gymnasium- the pnel's collage of brilliant- jk of all trades," he says,
free-form creation, gallery ex hours to complete the tedious like structures, devoid of any lv hed swimmers, skiers and "so this (stained glass) may be
hibitions and large commis- Job of molding and soldering ; embellishments, sports complex hockey players itself enough a nart of the greater scheme of
sions aside, in the interest of fragments together. Ralph designers have made room for to propel the two artists on to thing. I just don't know."
establishing a solid reputation
in the craft. ~ ~______
Small sales and a few com-
missions have thus far made
Ralph's flirtation with stained
glass "lucrative enough to cov-'il
er my behind," but only with
help from his wife's income and
government unemployment
checks from the teaching job
Ralph quit six months ago.
BUT RALPH doesn't flinch
over prospects of not be- The Second Floor at Borders Book Shop israpidly developing WERBECATi ratv ltig oyAon
ing able to make ends meet into one of the Ann Arbor art community's most excitingpe WEARABLE CRAFTS .Creative Clothing, Body Adorn
some day. He claims to have In addition to the gallery, which features fine graphics and ments, and Jewelry from Fabrics and Fibers, by Elyse and
the stained glass market all originals plus a full-service frameshop, you'll find the area's Mike Sommer .. ..pp.....P $5.95
most dazzling display of art books and books on related fields:
figured out, and boldly the stra- from criticism and design & techniques to topics like typeset- L
tegist ieveals his play: "Part ting, scu'lpture & color theory: plus a wide assortment of books LAMP AND UGHTING BOOK . Designs, Elements,
of this game is finding some- dealing with every conceiveable craft. Some of the most out- Materials, Shades-for Standing Lamps, Ceiling, and Wall
thing that's not too hard to cut and t l o Co ublh'Asd-en s Fixtures, by Thelma R. Newman ..... ...... pp $5.95
31 are listed here. Each volume in this distinguished series repre-
out (of glass), that doesn't take sents a unique opportunity for you to combine your creative CREATING SMALL WOOD OBJECTS as functional
too long to mold (sculot lead gifts with the top talents in the fields. written by experts and
drawing inspiration from the brilliant works of today's leading sculpture, by Dona Z. Meilach ....... .. pp $5.95
around the rim of eac glass craftsmen-these popular books are justifiably known as the
piece), has visual anneal and best in their particular fields. NEW IDEAS FOR NEEDLEPOINTERS . . . All-over initials;
can compete with T.V." Then Whether you prefer to explore new media or to find nw weas
of working with established media, at least one of the more Alphabets, old and new; Houndstooth patterns, and Birth-
with some assurance that other than 70 volumes in this series is ideal for you. Each book con- date plaids, by Marion B. Pakula ...........pp $5.95
qualities, inherent in the. stain- tains step-by-step instructions, hundreds of in-process photo-
ed glass itself have tackled at graphs and diagrams, many color and b w illustrations of MODERN STITCHERY .. . patterns stitches, and free-form
lpthe finished pieces, and, in almost every case, a valuable list of art
least part o e mission, e material suppliers and their addresses. It's a good series to get design, by B. Kay Fraser .... . . . . . . . . . . . . .pp $4.95
optimist jests, "Look, it doesn't to know.
use electricity and it's ecologic- The Crown Series is just a sinall part of the thousands of books MACR AME . . . Creative Design in Knotting, by Dona Z.
's more paid hundreds of artworks you'll find when you visit the second Meiach Over N million copies sold!)3.95
ally sound and it per- floor at Borders Book Shop. whether you just run in, get the M O - m c s . p 3.9
manent than T-shirts and costs book you need and run back to your studio, or stop by and C
about as much." browse awhile-have a cup of tea-we think you'll enjoy our CRAFTS FROM NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN ARTS.
Even sot Ralph does ac- .1nw Crafts and Fine Arts Department on the second floor. Techniques, Designs and Contemporary Applications, by
knowledge that most individ- Mary L. Stribling .. ...........pp $595
uals have finicky shopping ha- QI ACWRAPIUADTAUT
bits. "People haive to have aQULIG PACW R, PLQE, NDT PNO
need to buy things and let's Traditional Methods and Original Designs, by T. R.
face it, they haven't needed Newman
stained glss." Yet he has seen CREATIVE DESIGN IN WALL HANGINGS . . . Weaving
somted w over, theirdfancies patterns based on Primitive and Medieval Art, by Lil
captured by sunbeams dancing & Blumnau p $4.9
Blumenau ..........pp $4.95
CONTEMPORARY ART WITH WOOD . . . Creative Tech-
C m ic boo niques and Applications, by Dona Z. Meilach pp $4.95
SCA NEW LOOK AT CROCHET . . . using basic stitches to
create modern designs, by Elyse and Mike Sommer ....
(Continued from Page 2) p 59
Wrightson and Neal Adams,; aa£s
painting and CREATIVE GOLD- AND SILVER-SMITHING . . . Jewelry
have gone intor
other forms of art. s K and decorative metalcraft, by Sharr Choate with B. Cecil
Bob Tryersol, a University art de May .. . .p .
student, has drawn for a num- ART FROM FOUND MATERIALS 5 . Discarded and Na-
ber of comic magazines, and ATFO ON AEIL icre n o
would like to work for Marvel tural, by Mary L. Stribling pp $4.95
someday. He has been reading 7 ! .
comics for 13 years, and has
watched the art in them im- A E
prove. AN ~D {A VERITABLE MYRIAD Of OTHERS'
"Comic book artists are re-
spected professionals now," he p
says. "They've been given a ? 10e oft 'st price on all new hardbacks
free hand to try some really Betr Selecction of discotunted book-s in Md-America.
way out things, and it's made
the art more interesting." Pr i n the Maynard Street Ramp
Artists' styles are more ap- rut Tea riedtv :people *intelligent Service
parent in comic books now.,
Every character of every book
used to look the same, but now'

Fn

~1

r

I w
-I1

t

THE CROWN HOUSE OF GIFTS CORDIALLY INVITES YOU TO AN EXCITING
ADVENTURE IN GIFTS, HOME ACCESSORIES, CANDY, AND GREETING CARD
SHOPPING IN OUR NEW STORE.

r.

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w~& CARD SHOP
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Over 500 desicns of Contemporary Cards
Over 1500 desicns in Eve.rvdav Cards
Party Goods and Candle Shop
Season Cards for all occasions
" RUSSELL STOVER CANDY
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