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October 26, 1976 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-26

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Tuesday, October 26,'1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Fuesday, October 26, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine~

ONLY SECOND LOSS
MSU blanks clubbers

By GARY SWAN
Yesterday was a day for
hockey all right - on a good
pair of skates and with a ther-
mal muffler to keep out the
chilling 35 degree wind.
But it was hardly a day for
the "other" kind of hockey, the
kind played in bloomers expos-
ing legs to the icy air. So one
had to wonder what the Michi-
gan State athletic department
had provided in the way of
warmups for its women's field
hockey team on the way down
from East Lansing yesterday.
The Michigan women found
that they never could warm up
and the only thing that was a
traditional blue in the final
4-0 MSU victory was the color
of the players' lips.
"Yeah, it was cold out there,"
said Michigan's Lynn Darin.
But MSU played well together,
particularly in thefirst half."
It wasn't the type of day
when a player could shrug off a
solid crack in the shins with a
I

stick or ball. The MSU women
took charge early, scoring two
goals in the first ten minutes'
and their final two before the'
half ended. Their third score
bounded off the pole in the
corner of the Michigan net.
Most of the decisive first
half play never left the sight
of Michigan goalie Laura
Pieri. The defensive players+
couldn't dig the ball out ofI
the goal area often enough

for the wings and backs to
make much of an attack on
the MSU goalie.
The winners controlled the ball
so well that it seemed, at times,
if the women from East Lansing
had more people on the field.
The defeat left the Michigan
record at 4-2-1. The home team
took some consolation for the
day in a 1-0 victory by the
junior varsity over their MSU
counterparts.

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
WASHINGTON SUMMER INTERN PROGRAM
in WASHINGTON, D.C.
MASS MEETING
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27
7:30 P.M.
NAT. SCI. AUD.

Introduction to Kundahm iYoga
. AS TAUGHT BY
Sward Redra3n3da & Michael Shoemaker
BEGINNERS CLASSES EVERY
MONDAY WEDNESDAY 0FRIDAY
at 5:30 P.M.
Rudrananda Ashram
E 640 OXFORD ! 995-5483

Daily Photo by BRAD BENJAMIN
Michigan Field Hockey player Sylvia Aretakis maneuvers against two Michigan State defend-
ers to avoid being pinned against the sideline in yesterday's cold weather-plagued match In
Ann Arbor. The Spartan defense was tough all through the game and kept most of the play
near the Wolverine goal as they blanked Michigan, 4-0.
Redskins tr-04i p Car~ds 2010
Rain, fumbles -lague game
eP

I

"We Need an Innovative and Balanced
Energy Policy Sensitive to Concerns Over
Environmental Quality."
CARTER FAVORS strong measures for energy conservation including
peak-load pricing for electricity and mandated automobile efficiency
standards.
CARTER URGES extreme CAUTION in the development of nuclear
breeder reactors.
CARTER SUPPORTS increased emphasis on coal production and in-
creased research on solar, wind, and geothermal energy.
CARTER SUPPORTS legal restrictions against ownership by single
firms of competing energy sources-such as coal and oil.
FORD SUPPORTS fast development of nuclear energy and
the placement of nuclear plants in Third World nations..
COTE FOR CARTER-FOR A COHERENT AND SAFE ENERGY POLICY

I

HOMECOMING '76
OCT. 28-30
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28
PEP RALLY
7:30 p.m. at Sigma Chi, 548 S. State (next to the Union)
Bo, the Team, & the Marching Band!
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29
MICHIGAN DAY!
Wear something Maize, Blue, or with Michigan on it!
WUOM OPEN HOUSE
10.a.m.-7 p.m.-5th floor LSA Bldg.
Tours of the studio, meet favorite radio personalities,
free cider & donuts
DIAG DAZE
Check it out! 3-5 p.m. on the Diag
JUDY COLLINS
In concert 8 p.m. Hill Auditorium. Tickets $4, $5, $6
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30-Homecoming Day
WELCOME HOME!
To all alumni and to the best football team in the country!
MUDBOWL '76
SAE vs. Phi Delta Theta, 10:30 a.m. in the Mudbowl at the
corner of S. University and Washtenaw
WUOM OPEN HOUSE
10 a.m.-2 p.m., 5th floor LSA Bldg.
UAC'S HOMECOMING PARADE!
Parade leaves the Union at 12:00 noon and will pro-
ceed to the Stadium, meeting the Marching Band at
Revelli Hall. Prize for the best float! Contact Bryan
Lee, 663-1029, to enter.
HOMECOMING '76 FOOTBALL!
MICHIGAN vs. MINNESOTA for the Brown Jug!
Kickoff: 1:30 p.m. LET'S GO BLUE!!
MASQUERADE DISCO!
In the Union Ballroom, 9 p~m.-1 a.m. Cover is 50c,
Beer and Wine coolers. Costume and Dance Contests.
Win a dinner for two! Music by Professional Disco
Service.

t

By The Associated Press N
WASHINGTON-Eddie Brown b
returned a punt 71 yards forS
a touchdown in the fourth quar-'
ter just 93 seconds after Mike
Thomas went seven yards for
another score last night to give
the Washington Redskins a 20-
10 National Football League vic-
tory over the St. Louis Cardin-|
als in a nationally - televised
game played in a steady raina
that produced 13 fumbles.
Thomas' touchdown run,
which gave the Redskins ae
13-10 lead, was set up whent
the Cardinals' Terry Metcalfl
fumbled on his own 10-yard
line and Washington defensivej
end Dennis Johnson recovered
with 10:38 remaining in the
game.
Metcalf fumbled for the'
fourth time as the Cardinals at-
tempted to mount a desperation
scoring drive that took them to
the Washington two within the
last minute of play. Hart found
The Top 20
By The Associated Press
The top Twenty teams in Thej
Associated Press college foot-
ball poll, with first-place votes
in parentheses, season records,
and total points.
TEAM POINTS
1. MICHIGAN (53) ......7-0-0 1,184
2. Pittsburgh (6).....7-0-0 1,068
3. U.C.L.A...........6-0-1 944
4. Southern California . 5-1-0 707
5. Maryland..........7-0-0 705
6. Texas Tech (1) .,.....5-0-0 618
7. Georgia..............6-1-0 483
8. Ohio State...........5-1-1 475
9. Nebraska.............5-1-1 368
10. Missouri........5-2-0 293
1:, Notre Dame..........5-1-0 292
12. Florida............. 5-1-0 287
13. Oklahoma............,5-1-1 268
14. Arkansas............ 4-1-0 159
15. Texas ......3-1-1 81
16. Oklahoma State. 4-2-0 33
17. Alabama ,. .. 5-2- 291
18, Mississippi State. 6-1-0 25
19. Colorado .... .....5-2-0 121
20. x-Cincinnati .. 5-1-0 10
x-Lone defeat, a 7-3 loss to South-
western Louisiana, was later forfeit-
ed to Cincinnati.

Metcalf at he one-yard line,
bu Mecalf fumbled and Jake
Scott recovered.
The Redskins' victory kept1
their playoff hopes alive in
the National Football Confer-
ence East Division with Dal-
las, the leader, coming into,
the nation's capital Sunday.
After a miserable first quar-I
ter in which the Redskins were
able to gain field goals by
Mark Moseley of 34 and 33
yards, the Cardinals put togeth-
er their first sustained drive in
the second period after a Mose-
ley 28-yard attempt was
blocked by Clarence Duren.

The Cardinals marched .65
yards on eight plays with
quarterback Jim Hunt hittingj
tight end J. V. Cain for an
eight-yard touchdown to put
St. Louis into a 7-6 halftime
lead.
The Cardinals, the highest-
scoring team in the NFC going
into the game, suffered seven
fumbles in the first half, losing
six of them, in addition to one1
interception. The Redskins also
recovered two St. Louis fum-
bles in the second half, break-
ing the old NFL record of sev-
en set by the Buffalo Bills in
1969.
~ - -~~~

r

He's an experienced
command law officer
' with integrity.

N

NNW

I

NOON ISSUES FORUM OCT. 27 & NOV. 1
ELECTIONS, ETHICS AND APATHY
V* "'tESDAY, OCT. 27
REV. RICHARD SINGLETON
|VERNMENT POWER AND ITS ABUSES:
A Critique from the Orientation of Biblical Prophets"
MONDAY, NOV. 1
DR. JOHN REED
a Baptist and a U-M Law School Professor
ELECTIONS, ETHICS AND RELIGION
Moderated by DR. STAN HARBISON
Noon issues are held in the Pine Room of the Wesley
Foundation attached to the First Methodist Church, State
& Huron. Sack lunches are encouraged. Tea, coffee, etc.
provided.
U-M SUMMER INTERN PROGRAM
,SOBS
RETAILING " PUBLIC RELATIONS o FINANCE
ADVERTISING " GENERAL BUSINESS
MEDIA S MARKETING
$140"wk
MASS MEETING
MONDAY, Nov. 1-8:00 p.m.
Rackham Auditorium
Open to liberal arts oriented sophomores,
juniors and seniors

y

paid political advertisement

fil
C'

PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT
()
Hey, John, I hear
you're running
for office!l
o
That's right, Bruce,
isn't that exciting?
(,J
.oe--
Yeah! Just think! Broads
and excursions, broads
and booze, broads and....
Uh...Bruce...
Yeah, John?
I'm not a Democrat.
7

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0

0

-- *

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27
NOSTALGIA NIGHT
Dance to the original sounds of the
BIG BAND ERA,
Tommy Dorsey-Benny Goodman-Freddie Martin
Eddie Duchin-Sammy Kaye-Glen Miller'
AND MANY OTHERS!
Put on Your "Saddle Shoes" and "Bobbie Socks" and Hop
on Over to the Blue Frogge! Have a Party with Your
Friends!!!
Better Yet, Come for One of Our
CANDLELIGHT SUPPERS.
FREE DANCING LESSONS-8-9 P.M.
TONIGHT-TUESDAY-IS LADIES' NIGHT!
LADIES ADMITTED FREE
3A ~ ~ .

% 1 "

____. f i s

Oh...well...you should
be more broad minded.
r~t-- %0

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IFI

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