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October 26, 1976 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-26

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Medieval Renaissance Collegium
will sponsor a
) SHERRY HOUR
with
"THE JONGLEU RS"
PERFORMING MUSIC FROM THE
COURT OF FERDINAND & ISABELLA
Thursday, Oct. 28th at 4 p.m.
in the Cook Room
N-entryway in the Low Quad)

Upper
By The Associated Press
The industrial areas of thet
upper Midwest are supposed to
be some of President Ford's
best territory, but his race with
Democrat Jimmy Carter is run-
ning neck-and-neck in these ciit-
ical states with a total of 96,
electoral votes.
An Associated Press Survey
of five Great Lake states indi-
cates Ford may be running
slightly ahead on the aggregate,
but taken one state at a time,
most of the -races are too close
to call.

Midwest a close race,

Tuesday, October 26, 1976
Carter says he'll
block Seafarer

Midwest have conservative Re- control over
publican tendencies in presiden- area.
tial elections, but the union in- Here are
fluence apparently is more unit- clusions of
ed and working harder than in based on int
recent years. cal and cam
RECENT developments that the latest av
could affect the vote in this reg- - MICHIG
ion are the resignation of Ag- gest a favo
riculture Secretary Earl Butz, Ford, who w
following disclosure of obscene from Grand
racist remarks he made about years. Carter
blacks, and by Ford's verbal showing him
slip in saying the nations of have put him
Eastern Europe are not domina- poll by the
ted by the Sovie Union - a the Presiden
remark that Ford later admit- margin recen
ted was in error. five to threea
Butz was widely popular margin of e
among Midwestern farmers, go either w
particularly with larger agri- 21 electorial
business interests, and his loss Carter's gr
has been generally lamented by in the ind
them. At the same time the areas, princi
nature of the Butz incident and the differenc
Ford's refusal to fire him out- bor's aggres
right gave the Democrats an effort and a
unexpected issue with which to lash against
exploit support among blacks, suburbs.
who are heavily concentrated -OHIO: A
in urban areas in these states, poll showed t
The industrial Midwest also 53 to 41, bi
has the largest concentration of feel it is clos
American voters of Eastern Eu- land has one
ropean ancestry, and many of munities of F
them have protested Ford's nics, and far
statement concerning Soviet east appear
with Carter's
Ford seem
bigger farme
of Butz. And

countries of that
state-by-state con-
the AP survey,
erviews with politi-
paign leaders anda
vailable polls:
AN: The odds sug-
rite son vote for
was a congressman
Rapids for 25
r had an early poll
ahead; Ford's own
ahead. The latest
Detroit News has
t ahead but by a
ntly narrowed from
points, with enough
rror that it could
ay for the state's
votes.
reatest strength is
dustrialized urban
ipally Detroit, and
ce could lie in la-
sive voter turnout
ny lingering back-
Ford in the ethnic
Columbus Dispatch
Carter leading Ford
ut most observers
er than that. Cleve-
of the largest com-
East European eth-
rmers in the south-
to be identifying
farm image.
s to be holding the
rs, despite the loss
tradition in Ohio,

with 25 electoral votes, also fa-
vors an incumbent Republican
president.

'

(Continued from Page 1) better quality of life at the same
- ILLINOIS: A straw poll by said he was pleased with time."
the Chicago Sun-Times gave Carter's support on the Seafar-
Carter a 10-point lead, but dis- er issue. THE DEMOCRAT accused the
agrees with a Chicago Tribune Nixon and Ford administrations
survey which put Ford ahead. "MY SUCCESS in persuading of "showing no serious concern
Private polls by the two cam- himt to take this position is a for our environment."
paign organizations show it vir- major accomplishment in this Peiden .
tually a tie. campaign," he said. The President spoke on na-
{{ tional radio in one of 14 radio
In Illinois with 26 electoral Carter's day was otherwise tlevision oradis
votes, Carter has .the important largely uneventful. He spent his
' of Chitime in Plains, Ga., making election committee launched
support ofCicago Mayor Rich- 'rprainsgr h cat-o yesterday to coincide with a
ard Daley's machine, and any preparations for the . coast-to- ysedyt oniewt
backlash on the Eastern Euro- coast trip that will keep him gruelling ten - day campaign
pankssue ou helpte er- moving in search of votes until swing aimed at wiping out a
pear issue would help the Dem- the eve of the election show- four-to-six point Carter lead in
ocrat in the Chicago area, which down with Ford. public opinion polls.
is snd to have mtoreoanyplac Aides to arter said the Campaigning in the Pacific
outside Warsaw, Poland p Democratic nominee would fo- Northwest, Ford said that all
' cus on economic issues and ap- 50 states must develop nuclear
- WISCONSIN: A Milwaukee peals for voters to exercise their energy programs, and he said
Sentinel poll has Ford ahead by ballot, the latter subject being that new noise standards for
five points, but private polls newly emphasized by the Dem- aircraft will create new jobs.
for both Ford and Carter call ocrats, who express concern
it a draw. The state is being about voter apathy and believe A D D R E S S I N G a re-
hotly contested by two first- a large vote will enhance'their aional meeting of the National
rate campaign organizations.. prospects. Association of Broadcasters in

I

Wisconsin, with 11 electoral
votes, is generally regarded as
liberal in its politics and sel-
dom votes Republican in a na-
tional election. The Republi-
cans normally can count on
support by dairy farmers, so
they are openly concerned about
an unexplainable disaffection
among the farmers in this cam-
paign.

.............

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91.7 FM OPEN
HOUSE IS
OCT. 29
FRIDAY, 10 A.M. - 7 P.M
&3O
SATURDAY, 10 A.M.- 2 P.

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1.

The Economic and Political
Crisis inItaly
and the Left Alternatives
A TALK BY
GIANGIACOMO MIGONE
Professor of American History. U. of Torino
Member, Central Committee, Party of Proliterian Unity
Tuesday, October 26-7:30 P.M.
Residential College, Room 126
Sponsored by the
Residential College Social Science Program
and the Union for Radical Political Economics

PRESS DIRECTOR Rex Gra-
num said Carter's attacks on
Ford would be restrained, hew-
ing close to his standard criti-
cism of Ford policies, especial-
by on inflation and unemploy- I
ment.
Carter, he said, is "trying to
demonstrate to the nation what
kind of president he will be.'
His office also released al
statement, on the environment,I
in which he promised as presi-
dent to "put the best brains in
this country to work" to try to
find ways to achieve economic
growth without unacceptable
pollution damage.{
HE ALSO called for vigorous
enforcement of pollution control
and occupational health lawsl
and the new Toxic SubstancesI
Control Act.
New chemicals intended for
commercial use must be screen-
ed before they hit the market to
prevent human and environ-
mental exposure to dangerous
comnnounds, he added.
"Pollution control does not
prevent economic progress,
Carter said. "This is a tremen-
dous new industry which can1
give us many new jobs and a
NvWMENU
at the
V-BELL

Portland, Ore., Ford was asked
about the development of nu-
clear energy, a controversial
allestion in Oregon and other
Pacific states.
"With adequate safety and
adequate safeguards we must
have in Oregon and the other
49 states a nuclear energy pro-
gram," Ford said.
He said the use of nuclear en-
ergy is "an important, signifi-
cant part of our over-all energy
program."
FORD ALSO- told the broad-
casters he is concerned by polls
suggesting that less than half
the eligible voters in the nation
may cast ballots.
"I thinks this is one of the
most crucial elections in my
lifetime," Ford said. "I hope
in the next eight days that my
opponent and myself can stim-
ulate more of the people to go
to the polls."
Earlier, Ford told aerospace
workers in Seattle that new
noise standards he has ordered
for U. S. airliners will crest
250,000 new jobs in their indus-
try.
Postal services of many coun-
tries advise against sending
cash through the mails. Japan's
service provides distinctive en-
velopes used solely for mailing
cash so the carrier knows he is
delivering money and gets a
receipt.

VISIT WITH STAFF
TOURS " DISPLAYS
REFRESHMENTS
5th rloor of LSA Bldg.
UM/Campus.

I

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Color Print Service
PROCESSING LAB
20% discount on
Kodak processing
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PARKING
3180 Packard
1 blk. E. of Platt
913-0110

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Graduate Scholarships in
Jewish Community Organization
PROGRAM
AVAILABLE

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AS ANN ARBOR'S
CAKE SPECIALIST,
We Custom make Cakes for any and
all occasions.
We also have Pastries, Coffee Cakes,
and an assortment of other Baked
Goods.
SUGAR BIN BAKERY
at the corner of Liberty & Main
300 S. MAIN 761-7532

College seniors and graduate students of any major
sequence are invited to apply for a combination of
scholarship grants and loans for a specialized program
of graduate education and training available at five
(5) Universities leading to a Master's Degree.
The graduate education and training specialization
is in the field of Community Organization with em-
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Community Organization, Agency Management,' Ad-
ministration, Community Planning, Fund Raising, and
Budgeting. Job Placement and long term careers with
Jewish Federations are assured after graduation. Any
major sequence can 'qualify with a minimum of a 'B'
average.
For more information, descriptive material, on-campus-
interviews, Contact:
Rabbi William Rudolph
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
1429 Hill Street
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
663-3336

--Mm -

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Brandeis University

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Hours: 8:30-9:00 M & F
I5:3 0, T, WT, S
FREE TUITION OPPORTUNITY IN ISRAEL

JACOB HAT TRD
INSTITUTE IN ISRAEL
A program of study Application deadlines:
about historic and mod- March 15

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Earn 16 credits per
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Financial aid available
a For a bro
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for fall term or, year program
(no language requirement)
November 15
for spring term (elementary
Hebrew required)
chure or further information, write:
Jacob Hiatt Institute
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
Waltham, Massachusetts 02154'~

FOR YOUR JUNIOR YEAR
-Deposit $2,070.00 with the Gift of Education not later than January of your fresh-
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-Tuition to the junior year abroad program of your cho'ce will be paid for by the
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FOR POST-GRADUATE STUDY
-Schedules of regular deposits can be drawn up to cover living expenses and fare
to Israel. Tuition will be free for one or two years of graduate study.
-Your money will be deposited at 5% interest. You have the right to withdraw at
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-Students wishing to do graduate work in Israel can join the savings deposit pro-
gram at any time provided they do so at least two years before planning to begin
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d
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Paid Political Advertisement
GEORGE
STEEH
DEMOCRAT for
PROSECUTING ATTORNEY

__________________t '

As attorney for the people, and their chief law enforce-
ment official, the prosecuting attorney has-a more direct
and significant impact on the daily lives of county resi-
dents, on campus? and off, than any other official to be
elected November 2nd.
The prosecuting attorney can concentrate limited criminal
iustice resources in such critical areas as rape, robbery,
consumer fraud and environmental abuse: or, like the
incumbent, he can waste these resources pursuing victim-
less offenses. The prosecuting attorney can see that tenants
are protected from unsafe housina, that nursing home
patients are protected from physical and fiscal abuse, and
that the whole community is protected from collusive price-
fixing that artificially inflates prices for groceries and
other merchandise: or, like the incumbent, he can ignore
these problems. The prosecutina attorney can bring the
concept of equal iustice closer to reality; or, like the in-
cumbent, he can continue with a system of double stand-
ards, one for the privileged few and another for the rest
of us. An energet;c. committed prosecuting attorney can
have a positive impact on our lives.
George Steeh, a native of Washtenaw County, earned his
bachelor's and law dearees from the University of Michigan.
He had experience in the best prosecutor's office in the
c-.- w.oe hawne _ CniorASeictnn+ Proecutina Attor-

Thak
Break
Savings!

TRAVEL OFFICE
2nd floor Union
OPEN M-F 10-4
CALL 763-2147

8Q TlO go)
NEW YORK
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