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October 21, 1976 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-21

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A rts &Entertainment

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October 21, 1976

Page Five

MIMWAWAVAW

Keith Jarrett to play Hill

By JIM STIMSON
JAZZ PIANIST Keith Jarrett will perform a
concert on solo piano this Saturday night
at Hill Auditorium.
Jarrett has received international acclaim for
his prolific composition and fluid, natural play-
ing style. He is eclectic and imaginative, his
compositions ranging from tuneful to jagged to
rhythm and bluesy.
Jarrett began playing with the Charles Lloyd
Quintet in the mid-to-late sixties, followed by a
stint with Miles Davis. His piano fit well in
the saxophone-bass-drums combo (with Lloyd
on sax), and he has recorded recently with
horn men Dewey Redman and Jan Garbarek.
BUT JARRETT'S true claim to fame is his
work on solo acoustic piano. He prefers not to
use an electric piano.
"I am, and have been, carrying on an anti-
electric music crusade . . ." says Jarrett in the
notes of his Solo Concertos album. "Electricity

runs through all of us and is not to be rele-
gated to wires."
Solo Concertos, recorded by Jarrett in Bre-
men and Lausanne was voted Downbeat Record
of the Year in 1974. Though it is a three-record
set, it is the largest selling release in the short
history of ECM Records.
LAST SUMMER Jarrett combined with Gar-
barek, bassist Charlie Haden, drummer Paul
Motian and a string ensemble for' a European
tour. Jarrett seldom plays solo piano in the
U. S.
Jarrett feels solo playing is different from
group effort because the solo artist has no
responsibility to the rest of the group, only to
the audience. "One is firstly responsible to the
other players," says Jarrett of group playing,
"and so the cycle is not quite complete, not
quite pure."
Tickets for the concert are on sale at Discount
Records, Schoolkid's Records, and the Michi-
gan Union. Showtime is 8 p.m.

Arbour Zeta: Quasi-Baroque

J(I rIetI

I

M By LARRY FRISKE more in this piece and leads
KEITH JARRETT'S latest the trio in an almost bluesy
album, Arbour Zeno (ECM-Y-kind of walking. It's the most
s1070) was recorded in Germany appealing work on the album
following- his appearance last simply because of the context
Sonny Terry and Brownie McGehee, who are p laying through Sunday at the Raven Gallery in October in East Lansing. Here and Jarrett's more aggressive
Southfield his piano work interacts with and dominant approach to the
-- ----- -----Jan Garbarek on tenor and so- score.
prano saxophones and bassist "Solara March", however, is
ANGEL RECORDINGS Charlie Haden, within the lush a departure from Jarrett's re-
and textural setting of the Stutt- cent directions. He's becoming
gart Radio Symphony String more and more involved in a
1 iou sso rg skIses: 1 0 Orchestra as conducted by Mla- cuasi - classical approach as
den Gutesha. reflected in his work with sym-'
Jarrett's three compositions phony orchestras. This trend'
By TOM GODELL abrupt, almost accidental. Most ing sounds are what make the are all individually dedicated was notable on other albums;
FROM ANGEL and Angel/ importantly, he shows an in- music of Moussorgsky powerful and the dedications often indi- besides the current one: this,
Melodiya come two new re- ability to build a climax, as and original. cate the direction the music one was timed to be released
cording of the music of Modeste demonstrated by his headlong, The excerpts came from takes. ' "Runes" (dedicated to during Garbarek's first U. S.
Moussorgsky. The first (Angel uncontrolled rush to the end. Boris Gundunov, "Khovants- the Unknown) is carefully craft- tour.
.S-37723) features Michel Beroff The real highlights of the al- china," and "The Fair at Soro- ed by the composer into a very
in a performance of Pictures at bum are the short scherzo and;chinsk," and were played with personal, introspective memor-
an Exhibition in the original "Turkish March", transcribed verve and feeling. ial - like dirge. Each soloist!
version for solo piano. This disc from works for orchestra. Here Svetlanov saved the best for lends his interpretation to the Re-elect H
is wholly unsatisfactory. Beroff displayed all the things last, however. In the devilish piece.
It begins with poor engineer- he lacked in the "Pictures" - Night on Bald Mountain, he Jarrett's methodical, quasi- GODD
ing. The piano sound is pinch- drama, warmth, and high spir- chooses a wild, hard - driving Baroqie statements give a
ed, lacking in power, body and its. As a result, the scherzo is ! tempo with tremendous, head- haunting quality to the piece, COUNTY TREASU
dynamic range. Further, in- a joyous romp and the march is jerking accents which produces which carries over to the leng- * College Graduate
stead of ending the first side at enthusiastic and colorful, unparalleled satanic frenzy. thy "Mirrors" ("To My Teach- 0 Accountant-assessor-b
the end of a section of the work, This is in direct contrast with Moreover, the performance is ers"). Jarrett combines with
the "Catacombs" movement Yevgeny Svetlanov's approach highly dramatic, a direct re- Garbarek and the space within 0 WCityeasrroContSl
has been split right down the to the y" same two pieces on sult of extreme contrasts of their music plays a central role sElectedn County Su
middle. Add to this the high Anerel ' "elodiya SR-40273, tempo, mood and color between in develoning a wistful feeling. EE d CE TrDAsu
level of surface noise on our Iwith tzs UTSSR Symphony Or- the various sections. A more A CHANGE in the atmosphere EXPERIENCE AND ABILI'
pressing and it is easy to see chestra. Svetlanov has no con- exciting reading of this score is then arrives with "Solara I NEED Y;
that this record was not pro- ception whatever of the scherzo difficult, to imagine. March" (dedicated to Pablo Ca-
duced with much care. and thus chose a lumbering - sals and the Sun). Jarrett plays -
Beroff's performance seems tempo accented by heavy or- LADIES' or CHILDREN'S
to echo this carelessness. Two chestral sound. In the march, HAIRCUTTING NEW YORK (AP) - Terry SCIENCE FICTION SE
examples will serve to point up; the triinmnhal main theme is CAaCUhmNGnEW aYORK o(AP) West' CEC ITO E
his major flaws. Perhaps the stated softly by the murkv bras- A SPECIALTY! "A Friend Is Dying," released2
most moving 'picture' Is Sam9 ses, highlighting a rough and 72 as part of their "Amer-,
uel Goldenberg and Schmuyle, overblown reading.ae
which contrasts a rich, portly THE FIRST side consists en- STYLISTS IJNte" wi esth DE R
merchant with a starving beg- tirely of preludes and inter- ARBORLAND-97 1;-9975 Records.
gar. Here all feeling is absent. ludes from Moussorgsky operas. MAPLE VILLAGE-761-2733 APerha s the best Disne
Truly Beroff's technique is for- These were much more success- E. LIBERTY---668-9329 roAlso, all artists' royalties Paps t wen n
midable, but that is no reason fill. My onlycomplaint is that E. UNIVERSITY--662-0354 from it will be donated to New cartoons, It won an Aca
_________________ York effects. An all-star cas
to rush the plaintive, rustling Svetlanov elected, almost ex-
melody in the right hand. clusively, to use the 'revised' las, James Mason, Pe
IN The Old Castle, a trouba- versions by Rimsky - Korsa- Varne's tole about t
dor sings at the gate of a me- kov. In these ┬░versions Korsa-, ANN AIQIEl- ELM c-cr Nemo and the atomic s
dieval castle., This time Beroff kov often took completed scores *""""""**********"""""""********
is aloof, distant and disinter- and exounged 'wrong' notes FRIDAY: Scien
ested. The melody fails to sing, and 'mistaken' harmonies. Ac- A TONIGHT9'
and dramatic pauses sound tually these pungent and strik- ANTONIONI S 1975 LUCAS T
THE PASSENGER
Jack Nicholson and Maria Schneider star in Antonioni's smashingCIEAG LD TN
comeback film, about a man who successfully manages to change 7:00
P h o to s~ o m-- 1e F r shis identity, yet can't escape his destiny. Identity and character
ssveitlnd a in the now-famous seven minute final shot
of THE PASSENGER, a shot which may go down as one of the
great extended moments in movie history. ". . . a hauntingly
By DEBORAH MEADOWS viewed anytime between 12-10 beautiful work of art ... not to be missed."--Andrew Sarris.
Showing in the "B" Gallery'p.m. Monday through Thursday $1.25, AUD. A, ANGELL HALL
f% ArWnlcGai tand 9-4 on Sundays. Even if your

In between sessions Jarrett
has found time to participate in
festivals and concerts of "seri-
ous music" like the Cabrillo
Festival in California. Also his
Koln Concert from last year
continued his remarkable criti-
cal and popular success. It was
honored as the Best Pop Album
of the Year in Time magazine.
Jarrett's special approach to
his are and to life reflects a
kind of universal.consciousness.
As he told an interviewer re-
cently, "The one thing that has
governed what I've done has
been not to identify with some-
thing I did. That may be thej
most important thing, not just
in art .but in your whole life."'
Paid Political Advertisement 3

October 20 -24
Sm viw

ANN ARBOR
CIVIC THEATRE
by Tennessee Williams

Tickets Available at the Lydia Mendelssohn box
office in the Michigan League, 763-1085
HOURS: Mon., Oct. 13 & Tue., Oct. 19, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Wed-Sat., Oct. 20-23, 10 a.m. to Showtime
Sunday, Oct. 24, 3 p.m. to Showtime

ILARY E.L.
ARD
RER-DEMOCRAT
ank auditing
ler
pervisor 1967-68
rer
TY MAKE A DIFFERENCE
OUR VOTE
RIES 1954
SEAGUES
TH E SEA
y movie outside of the
ademy Award for special
t including Kirk Doug-
ter Lorre, revive Jules
he mysterious Captain
ubmarine, Nautilus.
ce Fiction Series
THX 1138
IGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
& 9:30 Admission $1.25
I N

of art worias (i3'72 . i┬▒1)
until November 9 is a photog-
raphy exhibit featuring the work
of Ann Arborite Stanley Living-
ston.
Livingston is a commercial-
industrial photographer although
the photographs of this display
focus upon a more personal as-
pect of the artist: Part of this
focus is upon people. Some of
his subjects are obviously posed,
yet their manner, as portrayed
by Livingston, is fresh and hap-
py.
ONE BEAUTIFUL and artful.
ly done photograph shows B.B.
King in a 1971 concert - like
most of Livingston's human sub-
jects, smiling.
In contrast, the exhibit also'
includes photographs which
have been compiled as a 19761
calendar for St. Joseph Mercy
Hospital. Here, Livingston
chooses to focus upon (believe
it) hospital paraphernalia. Pho-
tos of a stethascope, test tubes,
tongue depressors and even lin-
en have been done in a totally
" unique and interesting manner.
The Livingston exhibit can be
GREEKS ...
Tonight is your night at
Bimbo's of Ann Arbor.
Come drink b e e r at
reduced r a t e s, and
fraternize with y o u r
friends.
Large' groups get
special rates when
they call ahead.
nu. &A A

interest in photography is hum-
ble, this is something you might
want to take a gander at.
-

-

R.C. /E.Q. PLAYERS

Present

ART .1 Theatre:
"Intimate Teenager"
Sexiest Show in town

ART II/Theatre:
"Sou per Mana"
"Taking of Christina"
STARTS OCT. 13
ART THEATRES
31 N. WASHINGTON
IYPSILANTI-482-3300
H HALLOWEEN
MAKE-UP f
Clown white, grease
point, rouges,
colored hair spray,
and much more.
WE CARRY FULL LINES OF
THEATRICAL
MAKE-UP
BY
" STEIN *
* MEHRON oE
LUCKY DRUGS. INC.

THREE ONE-ACT PLAYS
THE BEAR
BY ANTON CHEKHOV
directed by CHRISTINE CHIlD
PtAING WITH FIRE
BY AUGUSTE STRINDBERG
directed by LESLIE McCLEOD
THE WIMITRII TUN
BY TIM PRENTISS
directed by the PLAYWRIGHT
OCTOBER 21,22,23 8 PM
R.C. AUDITORIUM
admission $100

ii
i
IKZ
i

I

FRI.-SAT.

$2.50

NORMAN
KENNEDY

from SCOTLAND

ballads, songs & tales
without a doubt one of the
finest living singers in (or out of)
any tradition from anywhere."
-New York Times

Formerly the head weaver at Colonial Williams-
burg, Norman Kennedy hails from Aberdeen,
Scotland, has been adopted by an American
Indian tribe, is totally charming, and a highly
polished performer
SUN.-Concert by the STREETWAX COLLEC-
TIVE in a benefit for the Ark. $1.50
Ttc -TE R'kAArrAT', DR1T1AA

m

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